St. James Episcopal May 10, 2011
Bill Grass, JJA Spokesperson Louisiana TIMED Managers
Louisiana TIMED Program <ul><li>Created by Act 16 of the 1989 Louisiana legislature & voted for by the people </li></ul><u...
Louisiana TIMED Managers <ul><li>Hired in 2002 by Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development to accelerate the...
John James Audubon Bridge Project <ul><li>One of the TIMED program’s 16 projects </li></ul><ul><li>Contractor is Audubon B...
John James Audubon <ul><li>Born Jean Rabin on April 26, 1785 in present-day Haiti to French parents </li></ul><ul><li>Rais...
The Young Audubon <ul><li>As a youngster, Audubon enjoyed walking in the woods </li></ul><ul><li>Often made crude drawings...
Early Years in U.S. <ul><li>Once in U.S., Audubon caught yellow fever </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nursed by Quaker women, who ta...
Early Years in U.S. <ul><li>Areas around Audubon’s home provided ample opportunity for hunting, fishing, & drawing </li></...
Beginning of a Career <ul><li>Audubon began studying American birds </li></ul><ul><li>Determined to illustrate his finding...
Refining Skills <ul><li>Audubon returned to France in 1805 to see his father, ask permission to marry, & discuss family bu...
Family Life <ul><li>Audubon went to New York to learn the import-export trade </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Needed to support his ...
New Career <ul><li>Began a general store with Ferdinand Rozier in Louisville, KY on the Ohio River </li></ul><ul><ul><li>M...
Back to Nature <ul><li>Audubon's business was not thriving due to Thomas Jefferson’s embargo of British trade </li></ul><u...
New Beginnings <ul><li>Became American citizen & gave up French citizenship in 1812 </li></ul><ul><li>Rats ate his entire ...
Good Times, Bad Times <ul><li>Audubon had good fortune between 1812 and the Panic of 1819 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bought lan...
Audubon in Louisiana <ul><li>Audubon decided to paint all birds of North America for publication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cal...
Making Ends Meet <ul><li>Audubon tried to paint 1 page daily for  Birds of America </li></ul><ul><li>Hired hunters to gath...
Seeking Publication <ul><li>Audubon returned to Philadelphia in 1824 to seek a publisher for his bird drawings </li></ul><...
Birds of America <ul><li>Audubon went to England in 1826 with 250 drawings </li></ul><ul><li>The British were enthusiastic...
Birds of America <ul><li>Printing cost was $115,640 (over $2 million today), paid for from advance subscriptions, exhibiti...
Life After  Birds of America <ul><li>Returned to U.S. in 1829 to complete more drawings & settle business affairs, then we...
Life After  Birds of America <ul><li>In the 1830s, Audubon continued making expeditions in North America </li></ul><ul><li...
Later Life & Death <ul><li>Made some excursions out West </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hoped to record Western species he had miss...
John James Audubon Bridge <ul><li>Naming the new bridge after John James Audubon exemplifies the importance & preservation...
John James Audubon Bridge <ul><li>The John James Audubon Bridge is the longest cable-stayed bridge in the Western Hemisphe...
What is a Cable-Stayed Bridge? <ul><li>Consists of one or more towers with cables that support the deck </li></ul>tower de...
Cable-Stayed vs. Suspension <ul><li>The towers carry the load on cable-stayed bridges </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cables support...
Cable-Stayed vs. Suspension <ul><li>Cable-stayed bridges are good for medium-length crossings </li></ul><ul><li>Suspension...
Types of Bridges <ul><li>Cable-stayed bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hale Boggs Memorial Bridge (“Luling Bridge”) </li></ul>...
Types of Bridges <ul><li>Cantilever bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Horace Wilkinson Bridge (“New Bridge”) </li></ul></ul><ul...
Types of Bridges <ul><li>Arch bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sydney Harbour Bridge </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Beam bridge </li><...
JJA General Facts <ul><li>2.44-mile four-lane elevated bridge structure with two 11-foot travel lanes in each direction wi...
JJA General Facts <ul><li>Approximately 12 miles of two-lane roadway connecting LA 1 east of Hospital Road in New Roads to...
JJA General Facts <ul><li>Project broke ground in May 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>The bridge is the longest cable-stayed bridge...
JJA General Facts <ul><li>First design-build project in Louisiana </li></ul><ul><li>Bridge is the only Mississippi River c...
Economic Development <ul><li>What the Audubon Bridge brings: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A more efficient and reliable route for...
Audubon Mainspan Quick Facts <ul><li>Towers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>520’ height </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 crossbeams </li...
Audubon Mainspan Quick Facts <ul><li>Mainspan Deck </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1,583’ length </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Approxim...
Bridge Opening <ul><li>Bridge was opened on May 5, 2011 due to rising water in the Mississippi River </li></ul><ul><ul><li...
Bridge Opening Photos
Tower Construction <ul><li>Footings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>42 (21 each) drilled shafts anchored into Mississippi </li></ul>...
Cofferdam Photos
Cofferdam Photos
Cofferdam Lowerings
Tower Construction <ul><li>Footings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pedestals constructed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>35 tower “lifts...
Time-Lapse Video
Audubon Bridge Project Fun Facts 500’ 1000’ 1500’ State Capitol 460’ Audubon Tower 520’ One Shell Square, N.O. (Tallest Bu...
Audubon Bridge Project Fun Facts <ul><li>Deck is 241,600 square feet </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Approximately four football fie...
Audubon Bridge Project Fun Facts <ul><li>5,668 cubic yards of concrete in deck </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Would fill almost two...
Audubon Bridge Project Fun Facts <ul><li>Approximately 473 miles of individual strands </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Would stretch...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Be sure to visit www.audubonbridge.com!
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Jja st. james presentation

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A presentation on the new John James Audubon Bridge, the longest cable-stayed bridge in the Western Hemisphere, crossing the Mississippi River in south-central Louisiana

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Jja st. james presentation

  1. 1. St. James Episcopal May 10, 2011
  2. 2. Bill Grass, JJA Spokesperson Louisiana TIMED Managers
  3. 3. Louisiana TIMED Program <ul><li>Created by Act 16 of the 1989 Louisiana legislature & voted for by the people </li></ul><ul><li>Largest transportation program in state history </li></ul><ul><li>Sixteen specific projects across the state </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to stimulate economic development </li></ul>
  4. 4. Louisiana TIMED Managers <ul><li>Hired in 2002 by Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development to accelerate the TIMED program </li></ul><ul><li>Joint venture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parsons Brinckerhoff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>GEC, Inc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The LPA Group, Inc. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. John James Audubon Bridge Project <ul><li>One of the TIMED program’s 16 projects </li></ul><ul><li>Contractor is Audubon Bridge Constructors, a joint venture of </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Flatiron Construction Corp. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Granite Construction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parsons Transportation Group </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. John James Audubon <ul><li>Born Jean Rabin on April 26, 1785 in present-day Haiti to French parents </li></ul><ul><li>Raised in France as Jean-Jacques Fougère Audubon </li></ul><ul><li>Emigrated to U.S. in 1803 & changed name to John James Audubon </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Young Audubon <ul><li>As a youngster, Audubon enjoyed walking in the woods </li></ul><ul><li>Often made crude drawings of birds, eggs, & nests </li></ul><ul><li>Went to military school at age 12 to become seaman </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Susceptible to seasickness; disliked mathematics & navigation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Failed officer's qualification test </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Audubon ended naval career & began exploring again </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Focused on birds </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Early Years in U.S. <ul><li>Once in U.S., Audubon caught yellow fever </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nursed by Quaker women, who taught him English </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lived in family home in present-day Audubon, PA </li></ul>
  9. 9. Early Years in U.S. <ul><li>Areas around Audubon’s home provided ample opportunity for hunting, fishing, & drawing </li></ul><ul><li>Fell in love with Lucy Bakewell, who shared his interest in nature </li></ul>
  10. 10. Beginning of a Career <ul><li>Audubon began studying American birds </li></ul><ul><li>Determined to illustrate his findings in a more realistic manner than most artists did </li></ul><ul><li>Began conducting the first known bird-banding in North America </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tied yarn to the legs of Eastern Phoebes & determined that they returned to the same nesting spots every year </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Began drawing & painting birds, and recording their behavior </li></ul>
  11. 11. Refining Skills <ul><li>Audubon returned to France in 1805 to see his father, ask permission to marry, & discuss family business plans </li></ul><ul><li>Met naturalist/physician Charles-Marie D'Orbigny </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improved Audubon's taxidermy skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Taught him scientific methods of research </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Back in America, he resumed bird studies & created his own nature museum </li></ul><ul><li>Became proficient at specimen preparation & taxidermy </li></ul>
  12. 12. Family Life <ul><li>Audubon went to New York to learn the import-export trade </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Needed to support his marriage to Lucy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Married in Kentucky in 1808 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Had two daughters (who died young) and two sons </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. New Career <ul><li>Began a general store with Ferdinand Rozier in Louisville, KY on the Ohio River </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most important port between Pittsburgh & New Orleans </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Began drawing bird specimens again & regularly burned earlier art to force improvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Took detailed field notes to document his drawings </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Back to Nature <ul><li>Audubon's business was not thriving due to Thomas Jefferson’s embargo of British trade </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Moved business to Henderson, KY </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Often hunted & fished to feed his family </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Audubon & Rozier ended partnership in 1811 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decided to work at ornithology & art </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. New Beginnings <ul><li>Became American citizen & gave up French citizenship in 1812 </li></ul><ul><li>Rats ate his entire collection of over 200 drawings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decided to re-do drawings to an even higher standard </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Formed partnership with Lucy's brother </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Built up their trade in Henderson, KY </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Good Times, Bad Times <ul><li>Audubon had good fortune between 1812 and the Panic of 1819 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bought land & founded a flour mill </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Went bankrupt after 1819 & put into jail for debt </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Earned a little money from drawing portraits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Helped improve his talent for drawing </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Audubon in Louisiana <ul><li>Audubon decided to paint all birds of North America for publication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Called it Birds of America </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In 1820, he went to Mississippi, Alabama, & Florida to find specimens </li></ul><ul><li>In 1821, he moved to Oakley Plantation in St. Francisville </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Taught drawing to the owners’ daughter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunity to roam & paint in the woods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stayed for 4 months & painted 32 bird pictures </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Making Ends Meet <ul><li>Audubon tried to paint 1 page daily for Birds of America </li></ul><ul><li>Hired hunters to gather specimens for him </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes used his talent to trade or earn money </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Made charcoal portraits for $5 each & gave drawing lessons </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Painted oil portraits for patrons along the Mississippi </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lucy, as a teacher, became the family’s breadwinner </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conducted classes for children out of their home </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Later became a teacher in Louisiana & lived with her children at the home of a wealthy plantation owner </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Seeking Publication <ul><li>Audubon returned to Philadelphia in 1824 to seek a publisher for his bird drawings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Charles Bonaparte admired his work & recommended he go to Europe to have his bird drawings engraved </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Birds of America <ul><li>Audubon went to England in 1826 with 250 drawings </li></ul><ul><li>The British were enthusiastic & called him “the American woodsman” </li></ul><ul><li>Raised enough money to publish Birds of America </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Made up of 435 hand-colored, life-size prints of 497 bird species </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Birds of America <ul><li>Printing cost was $115,640 (over $2 million today), paid for from advance subscriptions, exhibitions, oil painting commissions, & animal skins </li></ul><ul><li>It took over 14 years of field observations & drawings, plus Audubon’s management & promotion, to make it a success </li></ul><ul><li>Audubon sold oil-painted copies of the drawings to make extra money & publicize the book </li></ul>
  22. 22. Life After Birds of America <ul><li>Returned to U.S. in 1829 to complete more drawings & settle business affairs, then went back to England </li></ul><ul><li>In 1830, he was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences </li></ul><ul><li>He followed  Birds of America  with a sequel, Ornithological Biography </li></ul>
  23. 23. Life After Birds of America <ul><li>In the 1830s, Audubon continued making expeditions in North America </li></ul><ul><li>In 1833, he went to explore the ornithology of Labrador in Canada </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On return voyage, he stopped in Newfoundland & documented 36 species of birds </li></ul></ul><ul><li>After completion of Ornithological Biography , Audubon returned to U.S. with his family in 1839 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bought an estate on Hudson River (now Audubon Park) </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Later Life & Death <ul><li>Made some excursions out West </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hoped to record Western species he had missed, but health began to fail </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In 1848, he showed signs of senility </li></ul><ul><li>Died at his family home on January 27, 1851 </li></ul><ul><li>Buried in Manhattan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large monument in his honor at the cemetery, which is the center of the Heritage Rose District of NYC </li></ul></ul>
  25. 25. John James Audubon Bridge <ul><li>Naming the new bridge after John James Audubon exemplifies the importance & preservation of the rich history & heritage of the region </li></ul><ul><li>As Pointe Coupee & West Feliciana parishes are widely regarded for their abundance of wildlife, amazing landscapes, & preserved historic structures from the days of Audubon, it is only fitting that the new bridge be named in his memory </li></ul>
  26. 26. John James Audubon Bridge <ul><li>The John James Audubon Bridge is the longest cable-stayed bridge in the Western Hemisphere </li></ul>
  27. 27. What is a Cable-Stayed Bridge? <ul><li>Consists of one or more towers with cables that support the deck </li></ul>tower deck cable
  28. 28. Cable-Stayed vs. Suspension <ul><li>The towers carry the load on cable-stayed bridges </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cables support the deck </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The two large suspension cables carry the load on suspension bridges </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Suspender cables, or hangers, support the deck </li></ul></ul>Primary load-bearing structure Primary load-bearing structure
  29. 29. Cable-Stayed vs. Suspension <ul><li>Cable-stayed bridges are good for medium-length crossings </li></ul><ul><li>Suspension bridges are ideal for long-length crossings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The largest single-span bridge in the world is a suspension bridge </li></ul></ul>Pearl Bridge’s main span: 6,532 feet (1.2 miles)…over 4x longer than the Audubon Bridge’s main span!!
  30. 30. Types of Bridges <ul><li>Cable-stayed bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hale Boggs Memorial Bridge (“Luling Bridge”) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Suspension bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Golden Gate Bridge </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. Types of Bridges <ul><li>Cantilever bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Horace Wilkinson Bridge (“New Bridge”) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Truss bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hampden Bridge </li></ul></ul>
  32. 32. Types of Bridges <ul><li>Arch bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sydney Harbour Bridge </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Beam bridge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lake Pontchartrain Causeway </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. JJA General Facts <ul><li>2.44-mile four-lane elevated bridge structure with two 11-foot travel lanes in each direction with 8-foot outside shoulders and 2-foot inside shoulders </li></ul>
  34. 34. JJA General Facts <ul><li>Approximately 12 miles of two-lane roadway connecting LA 1 east of Hospital Road in New Roads to U.S. 61 south of LA 966 and St. Francisville </li></ul><ul><li>Four new intersections at existing LA 1, LA 10, LA 981 (River Road) and U.S. 61 for entry to and exit from the new roadway and bridge </li></ul><ul><li>Seven smaller bridges included in project </li></ul>
  35. 35. JJA General Facts <ul><li>Project broke ground in May 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>The bridge is the longest cable-stayed bridge in the Western Hemisphere </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Main span is 1,583 feet (almost 1/3 mile) </li></ul></ul>
  36. 36. JJA General Facts <ul><li>First design-build project in Louisiana </li></ul><ul><li>Bridge is the only Mississippi River crossing between Baton Rouge and Natchez </li></ul><ul><li>$409 million total cost </li></ul>
  37. 37. Economic Development <ul><li>What the Audubon Bridge brings: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A more efficient and reliable route for Pointe Coupee and West Feliciana </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A more efficient route for commerce and shipping traveling from central Louisiana </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased traffic provides opportunity for gas stations, restaurants, hotels and other businesses along the corridor </li></ul></ul>
  38. 38. Audubon Mainspan Quick Facts <ul><li>Towers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>520’ height </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 crossbeams </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anchored by 42 drilled shafts 180’ into the Mississippi </li></ul></ul>
  39. 39. Audubon Mainspan Quick Facts <ul><li>Mainspan Deck </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1,583’ length </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Approximately 130’ elevation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Composed of 428 precast concrete panels in 63 segments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>136 stay cables (4,548 individual strands) attached ranging from 220’ to 830’ in length </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4’ and 8’ expansion joints </li></ul></ul>
  40. 40. Bridge Opening <ul><li>Bridge was opened on May 5, 2011 due to rising water in the Mississippi River </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High water closed ferry service </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Construction not complete, but bridge is 100% safe for traffic </li></ul><ul><li>Construction will end in late 2011 </li></ul>
  41. 41. Bridge Opening Photos
  42. 42. Tower Construction <ul><li>Footings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>42 (21 each) drilled shafts anchored into Mississippi </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cofferdams constructed above water and lowered; water then pumped out </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cofferdam specs: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>160’ x 64’ x 55’ </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2500 tons </li></ul></ul></ul>
  43. 43. Cofferdam Photos
  44. 44. Cofferdam Photos
  45. 45. Cofferdam Lowerings
  46. 46. Tower Construction <ul><li>Footings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pedestals constructed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>35 tower “lifts” of 13’ segments performed on each tower </li></ul></ul>
  47. 47. Time-Lapse Video
  48. 48. Audubon Bridge Project Fun Facts 500’ 1000’ 1500’ State Capitol 460’ Audubon Tower 520’ One Shell Square, N.O. (Tallest Building in Louisiana) 697’ RMS Titanic 882’ Empire State Building 1,453’
  49. 49. Audubon Bridge Project Fun Facts <ul><li>Deck is 241,600 square feet </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Approximately four football fields </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Deck weighs approximately 25.7 million lbs. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Approximately 6,000 tons more than the Eiffel Tower </li></ul></ul>
  50. 50. Audubon Bridge Project Fun Facts <ul><li>5,668 cubic yards of concrete in deck </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Would fill almost two Olympic-sized swimming pools </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Approximately 13.5 miles of cable stays </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Would stretch from downtown Baton Rouge to Denham Springs </li></ul></ul>
  51. 51. Audubon Bridge Project Fun Facts <ul><li>Approximately 473 miles of individual strands </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Would stretch from Baton Rouge to Atlanta, GA </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Approximately 3,300 miles of wire in the strands </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Would stretch from Baton Rouge to Anchorage, AK </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Approximately 500,000 bolts used </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If placed ½ mile apart, would stretch from Earth to the moon </li></ul></ul>
  52. 78. Be sure to visit www.audubonbridge.com!

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