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Hands-on Science at Pasadena
Public Library
Inspired by Young Readers
League selection, Circus
Mirandus by Cassie Beasley
...
WHY IS THE SKY
BLUE?
WHY IS THE sun red at
sunset?
“The sky is blue because blue light is most readily scattered
from sunlight in our atmosphere… If blue light was not
scatt...
“At sunset the sun is low—near the horizon—and light
travels through a greater thickness of atmosphere before
reaching you...
WHAT COLOR IS our
sun?
White
(with a hint of yellow)
A white sun in airless, black outer space seen from the International Space Station. Credit:...
WHAT is our sun made
of?
http://alexpetty.com/2014/09/21/the-periodic-table-of-light/
https://www.britannica.com/topic/Fraunhofer-lines
Turn off lights
http://blog.sdss.org/tag/spectroscope/
http://www.scienceinschool.org/2007/issue4/spectrometer
“When lights of different
colors shine on the same
spot on a white surface,
the light reflecting from
that spot to your ey...
“With these three lights you can
make shadows of seven different
colors—blue, red, green, black,
cyan, magenta, and yellow...
https://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/color-table
write a secret message!
CMYK is a color system
used by printers for
making most* of the
colors of the rainbow
with just four basic
colors: Cyan, M...
Make your own cymk
rainbow!
Light intensity follows
an inverse square law,
that the light spreads
out and becomes less
intense according to the
square...
Prove it…
Okay! With some graph paper, a light
source, and a card with a square hole, we
can actually test the math of thi...
Be a Light Bender
Be a Light Bender
Be a Light Bender
Be a Light Bender
Be a Light Bender
Be a Light Bender
Be a Light Bender
Be a Light Bender
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Be a Light Bender

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In honor of our Young Reader's League selection for 2016, Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley, our science program for tweens for November was about light like the Light Bender character from the novel. We learned about our sun, turned CDs and poster tubes into spectroscopes and analyzed various light bulbs for their absorption spectra, played with color filters and wrote secret messages, and played with color LED lights and made shadows of various colors. I had one more activity planned about demonstrating the Inverse Square law of light but we ran out of time. I got most of my activities from a wonderful website: exploratorium.edu/snacks.

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Be a Light Bender

  1. 1. Hands-on Science at Pasadena Public Library Inspired by Young Readers League selection, Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley November 18, 2016
  2. 2. WHY IS THE SKY BLUE?
  3. 3. WHY IS THE sun red at sunset?
  4. 4. “The sky is blue because blue light is most readily scattered from sunlight in our atmosphere… If blue light was not scattered in the atmosphere, the sun would look a little less yellow and a little more white, and the sky would not be blue.” https://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/glue-stick-sunset Credit: www.pingry.org https://astrobob.areavoices.com/2012/08/26/what-color-is-the- sun/
  5. 5. “At sunset the sun is low—near the horizon—and light travels through a greater thickness of atmosphere before reaching your eyes than it does when the sun is higher in the sky… [T]he sunset appears red when the atmospheric path through which the sunlight travels gets longer. ” https://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/glue-stick-sunset Illustration: Bob King https://astrobob.areavoices.com/2012/08/26/what-color-is-the-sun/
  6. 6. WHAT COLOR IS our sun?
  7. 7. White (with a hint of yellow) A white sun in airless, black outer space seen from the International Space Station. Credit: NASA https://astrobob.areavoices.com/2012/08/26/what-color-is-the-sun/
  8. 8. WHAT is our sun made of?
  9. 9. http://alexpetty.com/2014/09/21/the-periodic-table-of-light/ https://www.britannica.com/topic/Fraunhofer-lines
  10. 10. Turn off lights
  11. 11. http://blog.sdss.org/tag/spectroscope/
  12. 12. http://www.scienceinschool.org/2007/issue4/spectrometer
  13. 13. “When lights of different colors shine on the same spot on a white surface, the light reflecting from that spot to your eyes is called an additive mixture because it is the sum of all the light. We can learn about human color perception by using colored lights to make additive color mixtures.” https://www.exploratorium.ed u/snacks/colored-shadows
  14. 14. “With these three lights you can make shadows of seven different colors—blue, red, green, black, cyan, magenta, and yellow—by blocking different combinations of lights… When you block two lights, you see a shadow of the third color—for example, block the red and green lights and you get a blue shadow. If you block only one of the lights, you get a shadow whose color is a mixture of the other two. Block the red light and the blue and green light mix to create cyan; block the green light and the red and blue light make magenta; block the blue light and red and green make yellow. If you block all three lights, you get a black shadow.” https://www.exploratorium.ed u/snacks/colored-shadows
  15. 15. https://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/color-table
  16. 16. write a secret message!
  17. 17. CMYK is a color system used by printers for making most* of the colors of the rainbow with just four basic colors: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and BlacK. Almost all the graphic novels you read are printed in CMYK! *CMYK makes fewer colors than RGB and many other color systems, but has been around longer References: The Complete Idiot's Guide to Creating a Graphic Novel, 2nd Edition By Nat Gertler, Steve Lieber https://graphiccommunicationsworkshop.wordpress.com/2011/10/21/week-8-prepress/ http://www.tucsononcanvas.com/include/guide_color_space_rgb_cmyk.php https://negliadesign.com/ask-a-designer/whats-the-difference-between-pms-cmyk-rgb-and-hex/
  18. 18. Make your own cymk rainbow!
  19. 19. Light intensity follows an inverse square law, that the light spreads out and becomes less intense according to the square of the distance. This is why it gets dimmer and dimmer the farther you get from the source. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverse-square_law#Example
  20. 20. Prove it… Okay! With some graph paper, a light source, and a card with a square hole, we can actually test the math of this equation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverse-square_law#Example https://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/inverse-square-law

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