Who says elephants cant dance on system z zero down time-9-7-20009

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Who says elephants cant dance on system z zero down time-9-7-20009

  1. 1. Sivaprasanth Rentala SA3-1-77,Bangalore Welcome to have to think “Who says elephants can’t dance on System Z mainframe (Zero down time) computing!”
  2. 2. Introduction to z/OS and the mainframe environment Welcome to mainframe computing! As a technical professional in the world of mainframe computing, you will need to understand how mainframe computers support your company’s IT infrastructure and business goals.. In banking, finance, health care, insurance, public utilities, government, and a multitude of other public and private enterprises, the mainframe computer continues to form the foundation of modern business. The long-term success of mainframe computers is without precedent (ex) in the information technology (IT) field. Periodic upheavals (disturbance) shake world economies and continuous—often wrenching (pull)—change in the Information Age has claimed many once-compelling innovations as victims in the relentless (harsh) march of progress. Why has this one form of computing taken hold so strongly among so many of the world’s corporations?
  3. 3. A brief look at IBM mainframe history
  4. 4. The S/360: A turning point in mainframe history System/360 the first general Purpose computer, introduced in 1964. Mainframes (often colloquially referred to as Big Iron ) are computers used mainly by large organizations for critical applications, typically bulk data processing such as census, industry and consumer statistics, ERP, and financial transaction processing. The IBM System/360 (S/360) is a mainframe computer system family announced by IBM on April 7, 1964. The chief architect of the S/360 was Gene Amdahl, and the project was managed by Fred Brooks, under Chairman Thomas J. Watson Jr.[2] IBM actually delivered fourteen models, including rare one-off models for NASA.
  5. 5. System 360 <ul><li>On April 7, 1964 IBM introduced System/360, a family of five increasingly powerful computers that ran the same operating system and could use the same44 peripheral devices. </li></ul><ul><li>For the first time, companies could run mission-critical applications for business on a highly secure platform. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1969, Apollo 11's successful landing on the moon was supported by several. </li></ul><ul><li>IBM introduced Information Management System (IMS) & Customer Information Control System (CICS). It allowed workplace personnel to enter, update, and retrieve data online. To date, CICS remains one of the industry's most popular transaction monitors. </li></ul>
  6. 6. System 370 The IBM System/370 (often: S/370) was a model range of IBM mainframes announced on June 30, 1970 as the successors to the System/360 family. In the summer of 1970, IBM announced a family of machines with an enhanced instruction set, called System/370. These machines were capable of using more than one processor in the same system (initially two), sharing the memory. Through the 1970s the machines got bigger and faster, and multiprocessor systems became common. Able to run System/360 programs, thus easing the upgrade burden for customers, System/370 was also one of the first lines of computers to include “ virtual memory” technology.
  7. 7. Enterprise Systems Architecture/390 - System 390 The System/370 line was replaced by the System/390 in the 1990s, and the architecture was similarly renamed from ESA/370 to ESA/390. This was essentially just a rename for marketing reasons, rather than major architectural change. I.B.M. overhauled the insides of the mainframe, using low-cost microprocessors as the computing engine. The company invested and updated the mainframe software, so that banks, corporations and government agencies could still rely on the mainframe as the rock-solid reliable and secure computer for vital transactions and data, while allowing it to take on new chores like running Web-based programs.
  8. 8. Pundits thought mainframes will not exist 1990. <ul><li>Some industry pundits, however, didn't think the mainframe would survive the early 1990s. They predicted that the rapid growth in personal computers and small servers would render “Big Iron” (industry jargon for mainframe) obsolete. </li></ul><ul><li>But IBM believed that serious, security-rich, industrial-strength computing would always be in demand, hence System/390. IBM stuck with the mainframe, but reinvented it from the inside, infusing it with an entirely new technology core and reducing its price. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Introduction to z/OS and the mainframe environment IBM System z, or earlier IBM eServer zSeries, is a brand name designated by IBM to all its mainframe computers. In 2000, IBM rebranded the existing System/390 to IBM eServer zSeries with the e depicted in IBM's red trademarked symbol.
  10. 10. System Z features IBM zSeries: <ul><li>http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/resources/servers_eserver_zseries_library_whitepapers_pdf_powering_on_demand.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>System Z features: </li></ul><ul><li>Web, J2EE, Linux and Java development </li></ul><ul><li>z/OS and Unix system services development </li></ul><ul><li>Windows development </li></ul><ul><li>Composite development </li></ul><ul><li>Testing and deployment </li></ul><ul><li>Relational database </li></ul><ul><li>Globalization support </li></ul><ul><li>Technology previews </li></ul>
  11. 11. System Z Models (chronological order) <ul><li>The older S/390 IBM mainframe servers are considered history since support for the last S/390 compatible version of z/OS (1.5) was dropped on March 31, 2007. </li></ul><ul><li>zSeries mainframes: </li></ul><ul><li>z900 (2064 series), for larger customers (2000) </li></ul><ul><li>z800 (2066 series), entry-level, less powerful variant of the z900 (2002) </li></ul><ul><li>z990 (2084 series), successor to larger z900 models (2003) </li></ul><ul><li>z890 (2086 series), successor to the z800 and smaller z900 models (2004) </li></ul><ul><li>System z9 mainframes: </li></ul><ul><li>z9 Enterprise Class (2094 series), introduced in 2005 initially as z9-109, beginning the new System z9 line </li></ul><ul><li>z9 Business Class (2096 series), successor to the z890 and smallest z990 models (2006) </li></ul><ul><li>System z10 mainframe: </li></ul><ul><li>z10 Enterprise Class (2097 series), introduced on February 26, 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>z10 Business Class (2098 series), introduced on October 21, 2008 </li></ul>
  12. 12. zSeries mainframes In October 2000, IBM announced the first generation of the zSeries mainframes. The z/Architecture is an extension of ESA/390 and supports 64-bit addressing. Dynamic channel management was also introduced, as well as specialized cryptographic capability. The mainframe became “open” and capable of executing Linux; special processors (IFLs) were developed. z900 was launched in 2000 and was the first IBM server “designed from the ground up for e-business.”
  13. 13. Few Technologies on mainframe. <ul><li>AS </li></ul><ul><li>AS/400 </li></ul><ul><li>Assembler </li></ul><ul><li>Brio </li></ul><ul><li>ChangeMan </li></ul><ul><li>CICS </li></ul><ul><li>CLIST </li></ul><ul><li>COBOL </li></ul><ul><li>CoolGen </li></ul><ul><li>CSP </li></ul><ul><li>DB2 </li></ul><ul><li>DFSORT </li></ul><ul><li>Easytrieve </li></ul><ul><li>Endevor </li></ul><ul><li>FileAid </li></ul><ul><li>IDMS </li></ul><ul><li>IMS </li></ul>Java Java Script JCL ICM OpenSource Mainframe VB SOA ODBC ITS Web2.0 UsefulSoftware Focus PLI
  14. 14. The companies who deal with Z mainframes. <ul><li>INFOSYS HCL ACCENTURE TCS IBM PATNI KANBY CTS COVANYS EDS WIPRO POLARIS L&T VETTRI SATHYAM/PCS MASCON SYNTEL XANSA HCL HPS4 Ford Hexaware verizon Mpowerss MASTEK ANZ </li></ul>IFLEX CGI HSBC MPHASIS MBT CITI BANK COLES MYERS DETUSCHE BANK NET CRAFT INFINITY PHENIX EFUNDS MINDTREE MINDTEK FEDILITY TIMKEN DIGITAL KEANE POLARIS MAJORIS US Software Macro Soft Nest etc.
  15. 15. THANK YOU

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