Rural	
  Property	
  Trends	
  Roadshow	
  
Wind	
  Energy	
  in	
  Kansas	
  
Norton,	
  Kansas	
  
December	
  4,	
  201...
Discussion	
  Goals	
  
•  Context	
  /	
  Info	
  
–  Wind	
  Energy	
  in	
  Kansas	
  
–  Regional	
  Electricity	
  Ma...
Key	
  ObjecOons	
  to	
  Wind	
  
•  Wind	
  costs	
  too	
  much	
  relaOve	
  to	
  other	
  fuel	
  
sources.	
  
•  W...
Wind	
  Energy	
  /	
  Kansas	
  
•  Wind	
  InstallaOons	
  
–  Installed	
  Wind	
  Capacity:	
  2,713	
  megawaWs	
  (M...
Wind	
  Energy	
  /	
  Kansas	
  
Wind Farms and Wind Resource Potential in Kansas

!
Meridian
Way
201MW

!
!
!
!

#

!
!
...
Wind	
  Energy	
  /	
  Kansas	
  
•  Wind	
  Economy	
  
Total	
  direct	
  and	
  indirect	
  jobs	
  2012:	
  	
  4001-­...
Wind	
  Energy	
  /	
  Kansas	
  
•  Wind	
  Resource	
  
–  Percentage	
  of	
  Kansas'	
  electricity	
  provided	
  by	...
Wind	
  Energy	
  /	
  Kansas	
  
EsOmates	
  of	
  Windy	
  Land	
  Area	
  &	
  Wind	
  Energy	
  PotenOal	
  by	
  Stat...
Map	
  of	
  ISOs	
  and	
  RTOs	
  

6	
  ISOs	
  in	
  North	
  America:	
  CAISO,	
  NYISO,	
  ERCOT,	
  AEISO,	
  IESO...
Southwest	
  Power	
  Pool	
  	
  
•  Who	
  is	
  SPP?	
  
•  Independent,	
  non-­‐profit,	
  
Regional	
  Transmission	
...
Our	
  Major	
  Services	
  
•  FacilitaOon	
  

•  Standards	
  Sesng	
  

•  Reliability	
  CoordinaOon	
  

•  Complian...
Regional	
  Electricity	
  Marketplace	
  
•  The	
  Southwest	
  Power	
  Pool	
  
–  Centralized,	
  regional	
  transmi...
Balancing	
  Authority	
  
•  With	
  the	
  Integrated	
  Marketplace,	
  SPP	
  will	
  assume	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  t...
SPP	
  Roles	
  and	
  ResponsibiliOes	
  
•  Post	
  implementaOon	
  of	
  the	
  Integrated	
  
Marketplace,	
  SPP	
  ...
Integrated	
  Marketplace	
  Net	
  Benefits	
  
•  Projected	
  savings	
  around	
  $45-­‐$100	
  Million/Year	
  
•  Red...
Development	
  &	
  Decision-­‐making	
  
• 

Iowa	
  

–  Wind	
  generaOon	
  potenOal	
  at	
  80	
  meters	
  
=	
  57...
Development	
  &	
  Decision-­‐making	
  
•  In	
  Iowa	
  

–  MidAmerican	
  Energy	
  in	
  construcOon	
  on	
  1050MW...
Development	
  &	
  Decision-­‐making	
  
•  In	
  Iowa	
  

–  “Facebook	
  has	
  selected	
  a	
  Des	
  Moines	
  subu...
Development	
  &	
  Decision-­‐making	
  
• 

• 

• 

• 

Oklahoma	
  
–  AEP-­‐PSO	
  adding	
  600MW	
  wind	
  
•  “Ame...
Development	
  &	
  Decision-­‐making	
  
•  Kansas	
  
–  Westar	
  buying	
  addiOonal	
  200MW	
  wind	
  from	
  KS	
 ...
Leadership	
  &	
  Policy	
  
•  Resource	
  Planning	
  

–  Complicated	
  and	
  closed	
  process,	
  liWle	
  public	...
Key	
  QuesOons	
  /	
  Discussion	
  
• 

• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

Wind	
  
–  Costs	
  too	
  much?	
  
–  Unreliable?	
  
...
Wind	
  is	
  uniquely	
  dependent	
  upon	
  gov’t	
  intrusion	
  and	
  market	
  manipulaOon?	
  

Energy Subsidies B...
What’s up with Community Wind?
•  Economies	
  &	
  efficiencies	
  of	
  scale	
  

–  Available	
  capital	
  
–  Demand	
...
Lesser Prairie Chickens and the ESA?
•  December	
  2012	
  -­‐	
  FWS	
  recommendaOon	
  to	
  list	
  the	
  lesser-­‐p...
Wind Energy in Kansas / Kansas Agricultural & Rural Leadership program / Norton, Kansas
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Wind Energy in Kansas / Kansas Agricultural & Rural Leadership program / Norton, Kansas

  1. 1. Rural  Property  Trends  Roadshow   Wind  Energy  in  Kansas   Norton,  Kansas   December  4,  2013  
  2. 2. Discussion  Goals   •  Context  /  Info   –  Wind  Energy  in  Kansas   –  Regional  Electricity  Marketplace   –  Development  and  Decision-­‐making   –  Leadership  and  Policy   •  Key  QuesOons  /  Discussion  
  3. 3. Key  ObjecOons  to  Wind   •  Wind  costs  too  much  relaOve  to  other  fuel   sources.   •  Wind  is  unreliable.   •  There  isn’t  enough  wind  energy  available.   •  Wind  development  is  ugly.   •  Wind  is  uniquely  dependent  upon  gov’t  intrusion   and  market  manipulaOon.   •  Wind  is  unproven.   •  Wind  represents  ideas/people  we  don’t  trust.  
  4. 4. Wind  Energy  /  Kansas   •  Wind  InstallaOons   –  Installed  Wind  Capacity:  2,713  megawaWs  (MW).  State   Rank:  9th.   –  Number  of  Wind  Turbines:  1,592  turbines.  State  Rank:  9th.   –  Wind  Projects  Online:  23  wind  projects   –  Wind  Capacity  Added  in  2012:  1440.7  MW.    State  Rank:  the   3rd  most  during  2012,  and  9th  fastest  growing  state.   –  Wind  Capacity  Added  in  2011:  199.8  MW  
  5. 5. Wind  Energy  /  Kansas   Wind Farms and Wind Resource Potential in Kansas ! Meridian Way 201MW ! ! ! ! # ! ! ! ! ! Smoky Hills Post Rock 249MW 201MW # # Central Plains 99MW ! ! # ! ! ! ! ! Cimarron Spearville 1-2 296MW 1-3 249MW ! # ! Buffalo Dunes " Gray County 112.2MW Ironwood Ensign 168MW 99MW Shooting ! Star Greensburg 105MW 12.5MW # # # # ! ! ! ! ! ## Elk River 150MW # Flat Flat Ridge Ridge 2 100MW 470MW Caney # River # # ! ! 200MW ! Sou rce: In stitu te for P olicy & S ocial Re se arch , The Un iversity of K an sa s; da ta fr om th e Natio nal Re newa ble E ne rgy Lab ora to ry with wind far m d ata from the K ansa s Wi nd Reso urce P lan ner a nd the K an sas Co rpo ratio n Commi ssio n. MW - me ga watts Kansas Wind Farms (2013) Existing (2,712 MW) # Wind Power Density at 50m (W/sq. m; 2009) Poor (0 - 200) " Under Construction Marginal (200 - 300) ! Proposed Fair (300 - 400) Good (400 - 500) Excellent (500 - 600) Outstanding (600 - 800)
  6. 6. Wind  Energy  /  Kansas   •  Wind  Economy   Total  direct  and  indirect  jobs  2012:    4001-­‐5000.    Rank:  5th.   Capital  investment:  over  $5  billion  dollars       Annual  land  lease  payments:  over  $7,900,000   NaOonwide,  the  wind  industry  has  over  550  manufacturing   faciliOes  producing  products  for  the  wind  industry  that  range   from  blade,  tower  and  turbine  nacelle  assembly  faciliOes  to  raw   component  suppliers  including  fiberglass  and  steel.    Number  of   manufacturing  faciliOes  in  Kansas:  7  faciliOes.   –  Major  wind  turbine  manufacturer  Siemens  opened  a  $50  million   nacelle  assembly  facility  in  Hutchinson,  Kansas  in  November   2010,  the  effects  of  which  will  be  felt  throughout  the  Kansas   supply  chain.   –  –  –  – 
  7. 7. Wind  Energy  /  Kansas   •  Wind  Resource   –  Percentage  of  Kansas'  electricity  provided  by  wind  in  2012:     11.4  percent.  State  Rank:  6th.     –  Equivalent  number  of  homes  Kansas  wind  farms  now   power:  over  840,000  average  American  homes.   –  Wind  potenOal  at  80  meters  hub  height  is  952,371  MW.     State  Rank:    2nd  best  wind  resource  in  the  U.S.   –  Raw  wind  power  is  capable  of  meeOng  more  than  90  Omes   the  state's  annual  current  electricity  needs.  
  8. 8. Wind  Energy  /  Kansas   EsOmates  of  Windy  Land  Area  &  Wind  Energy  PotenOal  by  State   for  areas  >=30%  Capacity  Factor  at  80m   State   Total  (km2)   Excluded   (km2)   Available   (km2)   Available   %  Windy   (%  of  state)   Land   Excluded   Kansas   211,861.3   21,387.1   190,474.2   89.38   10.1   Installed   Capacity   (MW)   Annual   GeneraDon   (GWh)   952,370.9   3,646,590   “Excluded”  (3  mi  buffer)   • Designated  urban  areas   • NaOonal  Parks,  Monuments,  Preserves   • Waterways   • Does  not  include  FAA  radar  installaOons  or  areas  like  the  Heart  of  the  Flint  Hills   Na#onal  Renewble  Energy  Laboratory,  updated  4/13/11  
  9. 9. Map  of  ISOs  and  RTOs   6  ISOs  in  North  America:  CAISO,  NYISO,  ERCOT,  AEISO,  IESO,  NBSO   4  RTOs  in  North  America:  PJM,  MISO,  SPP,  ISO-­‐NE   9  
  10. 10. Southwest  Power  Pool     •  Who  is  SPP?   •  Independent,  non-­‐profit,   Regional  Transmission   OrganizaOon   •  ~500  employees   •  Membership  in  9  states   •  Arkansas,  Kansas,  Louisiana,   Mississippi,  Missouri,  Nebraska,   New  Mexico,  Oklahoma,  and   Texas   •  Manages  reliability  from                   LiWle  Rock,  Arkansas   •  24  x  7  operaOons   •  Full  redundancy  and  backup  site   10  
  11. 11. Our  Major  Services   •  FacilitaOon   •  Standards  Sesng   •  Reliability  CoordinaOon   •  Compliance  Enforcement   •  Transmission  Service/   Tariff  AdministraOon   •  Transmission  Planning   •  Market  OperaOon     •  Training   Regional     Independent   Cost-­‐effec3ve   Focus  on  reliability   11
  12. 12. Regional  Electricity  Marketplace   •  The  Southwest  Power  Pool   –  Centralized,  regional  transmission,  distribuOon,  and  balancing   authority   –  Moving  to  an  Integrated  Marketplace  with  Day  Ahead  Market  –   commodiDzing  electricity   –  Efficiencies  and  economies  of  scale  at  work   •  GeneraOon,  UOliOes,  Consumers   •  Scale,  Scope,  Dispatch   –  Electricity  producOon  &  distribuOon  in  (esp.  rural)  America  has   been  balkanized  and  anachronisOc  –  exisOng  boundaries   increasingly  cumbersome   –  Loads  of  unanswered  quesOons,  but  change  is  coming  
  13. 13. Balancing  Authority   •  With  the  Integrated  Marketplace,  SPP  will  assume  the  role  of  the   Balancing  Authority  (BA)   •  Balancing  Authority  is  the  responsible  enOty  that  integrates  resource  plans   ahead  of  Ome,  maintains  load-­‐interchange-­‐generaOon  balance  within  a   Balancing  Authority  Area,  and  supports  InterconnecOon  Frequency  in  Real-­‐ Time   1   Balancing  AuthoriDes     (as  it  exists  today)   SPP  –  BA   (as  it  exists  tomorrow)   6   2   5   7   4   3   8   9   10   13   11   14   12   15   16   SPP   13  
  14. 14. SPP  Roles  and  ResponsibiliOes   •  Post  implementaOon  of  the  Integrated   Marketplace,  SPP  is  responsible  for:   •  Providing  all  market  services  for  Energy,  OperaOng   Reserve,  and  Transmission  Service  in  accordance  with   the  Open  Access  Transmission  Tariff  (OATT)  and   Market  Protocols   •  Managing  and  administering  the  Tariff   •  AcOng  as  the  centralized  SPP  Balancing  Authority   •  Providing  reliable  operaOon  of  the  transmission   system   •  Administering  the  Day-­‐Ahead,  Real-­‐Time,  OperaOng   Reserve,  and  Transmission  CongesOon  Rights  Markets   14  
  15. 15. Integrated  Marketplace  Net  Benefits   •  Projected  savings  around  $45-­‐$100  Million/Year   •  Reduce  total  energy  costs  through  centralized  unit   commitment  while  maintaining  reliable  operaOons   •  Day-­‐Ahead  Market  allows  addiOonal  price  assurance   capability  prior  to  real-­‐Ome   •  Includes  new  markets  for  OperaOng  Reserve  to  support   implementaOon  of  Consolidated  Balancing  Authority  (CBA)   and  facilitate  reserve  sharing   15  
  16. 16. Development  &  Decision-­‐making   •  Iowa   –  Wind  generaOon  potenOal  at  80  meters   =  570,714  MW.    7th  best  wind  resource   in  the  U.S   –  Wind  Jobs  =  6001-­‐7000.    State  Rank  =   3rd   –  Capital  investment:  over  $9.8  billion   –  Annual  land  lease  payments:     over  $16,000,000   –  Wind-­‐RelaOng  Manufacturing:  15   faciliOes.   –  Installed  Wind  Capacity:  5,133   megawaWs  (MW).  State  Rank:    3rd   –  Wind  Projects  Online:  100  wind  projects   –  Percentage  of  Iowa's  2012  electricity   provided  by  wind:  24.5  %.    Equivalent   number  of  homes  Iowa  wind  now   powers:  over  1.3  million  average  homes   –  Iowa  wind  power  is  capable  of  meeOng   more  than  44  Omes  the  state's  current   electricity  needs   –  Republican  governor,  Republican  House,   Democrat  Senate   •  Kansas   –  Wind  generaOon  potenOal  at  80  meters   =  952,371  MW.    2nd    best  wind  resource   in  the  US.   –  Wind  Jobs  =  4001-­‐5000.    State  Rank  =   5th   –  Capital  investment:  over  $5  billion   –  Annual  land  lease  payments:     over  $7,900,000   –  Wind-­‐RelaOng  Manufacturing:  7   faciliOes.   –  Installed  Wind  Capacity:  2,713   megawaWs  (MW).  State  Rank:  9th.   –  Wind  Projects  Online:  23  wind  projects   –  Percentage  of  Kansas’  2012  electricity   provided  by  wind:  11.4  %.    Equivalent   number  of  homes  Kansas  wind  now   powers:  over  840,000  average  homes   –  Kansas  wind  power  is  capable  of   meeOng  more  than  90  Omes  the  state's   current  electricity  needs   –  Republican  governor,  Republican   legislature  
  17. 17. Development  &  Decision-­‐making   •  In  Iowa   –  MidAmerican  Energy  in  construcOon  on  1050MW  of  new  wind  in  IA  by   2015   •  448  turbines,  power  for  317,000  addiOonal  avg.  households.   •  Up  to  1,000  new  construcOon  jobs  over  2  years,  40  permanent  jobs.   •  $1.9  billion  in  new  investment.  Will  be  the  largest  single  economic   development  investment  in  the  history  of  the  state.   •  $3  million  annually  in  new  landowner  payments,  $360  million  in  addiOonal   property  tax  revenues  over  30  years,  across  five  counOes.   •  All  of  the  blades  will  be  manufactured  at  Siemens’  Fort  Madison,  IA   facility,  while  the  nacelles  will  be  manufactured  at  Siemens’  Hutchinson,   KS  facility.   •  The  expansion  will  not  add  customer  costs  and  will  help  stabilize  electrical   rates.  Aver  the  first  350  megawaWs  of  new  generaOon  capacity  are   installed,  a  $3.3  million  rate  reducOon  will  take  effect.  By  2017,  the  rate   reducOon  will  increase  to  $10  million  per  year.   •  Once  new  turbines  are  operaOng  the  company  expects  to  produce  39%  of   its  retail  generaOon  from  wind  power  (coal  =  33%).  
  18. 18. Development  &  Decision-­‐making   •  In  Iowa   –  “Facebook  has  selected  a  Des  Moines  suburb  as  the  site  for  its   next  data  center.    The  social  media  giant  plans  to  break  ground   this  summer  in  Altoona,  Iowa,  on  a  $300  million  data  center  that   could  be  the  first  of  three  faciliOes  there.    Much  of  the  news   coverage  has  focused  on  the  $18  million  in  tax  credits  awarded   by  the  state,  but  Facebook  had  another  reason  to  ‘like’  Iowa:   wind  power.”    Midwest  Energy  News   –  “A  $1  billion  data  center  reportedly  has  picked  Iowa  over   Nebraska,  despite  an  effort  by  the  state  to  sweeten  its  economic   incenOves  for  such  large  projects.    And  Iowa  appears  poised  to   get  another  high-­‐tech  plum:  an  addiOonal  $400  million   investment  at  an  exisOng  data  center  for  Google  just  south  of   Council  Bluffs.”    Omaha  World  Herald  
  19. 19. Development  &  Decision-­‐making   •  •  •  •  Oklahoma   –  AEP-­‐PSO  adding  600MW  wind   •  “American  Electric  Power-­‐Public  Service  Co.  of  Oklahoma  said  it  originally  planned  to  purchase   up  to  200  megawaWs  of  wind  energy  but  contracted  for  an  addiOonal  400  megawaWs  aver   seeing  extraordinary  pricing  opportuniOes  that  will  lower  uOlity  costs  by  an  esOmated  $53   million  in  the  first  year  and  even  more  thereaver.”   Nebraska   –  OPPD  adding  400MW  wind   •  "It  had  to  do  with  the  prices,"  OPPD  spokesman  Mike  Jones  said,  when  asked  why  the  Omaha-­‐ based  uOlity  made  such  a  large  power  purchase.   –  LES  adding  100MW  wind  (from  Oklahoma)   –  NPPD  turned  down  lowest  cost  offers  on  200MW  (1700MW  submiWed  on  RFP)   –  LB104  extended  sales  tax  abatements  to  RE   Colorado   –  “Xcel  Energy  earlier  this  year  set  a  new  record,  generaOng  60.5%  of  its  electricity  using  the  wind,  up   from  its  previous  56.7%  record.”   –  Xcel  buying  an  addiOonal  550MW  of  wind  in  Colorado  “based  on  low  price  alone.”   –  State  RPS  expanded  and  now  includes  largest  RECs,  with  consumer  protecOons  and  in-­‐state   producOon  incenOves   Minnesota   –  Xcel  Energy  adding  750MW  wind   •  “The  company  said  the  projects  are  such  a  good  deal  that  ratepayers  will  save  $225  million  over   the  projects’  lives.”  
  20. 20. Development  &  Decision-­‐making   •  Kansas   –  Westar  buying  addiOonal  200MW  wind  from  KS  wind  farm,  but  also  raising   rates  and  shiving  rate  burden  to  residenOal  for  coal  plant  retrofit.    Enviro   rider  allows  cost/rate  recovery  w/o  rate  case.   –  KCPL  not  proacOve  on  wind  and  fighOng  solar  RPS  in  MO,  commiWed  to   coal  capacity.   –  Despite  approx.  19,000MW  of  wind  cued  in  the  service  territory,   Sunflower  declined  very  low-­‐priced  bids  for  wind  capacity,  reportedly  in   order  to  protect  Holcomb  2.   –  In  general,  KS  uOliOes  seem  to  be  dragging  their  feet  on  wind  energy  (esp.   relaOve  to  cost,  benefits,  available  resource,  and  local  economic  impacts)   while  invesOng  in  coal  capacity  (passing  costs,  risks  &  liabiliOes  on  to  KS   ratepayers,  and  providing  benefits  to  coal  producing  states  and  transport   enOOes).   –  Lack  of  comprehensive,  coordinated,  transparent,  accountable  resource   planning?  
  21. 21. Leadership  &  Policy   •  Resource  Planning   –  Complicated  and  closed  process,  liWle  public  involvement  or  oversight   –  KCC  recently  received  maximum  fine  for  violaOon  of  KOMA   –  KS  has  no  meaningful  IRP  process   •  RES  /  RPS   –  OpposiOon  fueled  by  parOsan  rhetoric  and  ideological  misinformaOon  and   influence,  funded  by  market  and  poliOcal  opponents   •  Economic  Development   –  Historic  status  quo,  poliOcal  influence,  and  outdated  energy  market  analysis   too  oven  drives  energy-­‐related  economic  development  decisions  and   opportuniOes.    Do  we  want  jobs  and  investment  only  for/from  one  sector?   •  Public  Health,  Environment,  Water   –  Shared  social  benefits  are  combining  with  basic  market  forces  and  fuel  cost   realiOes  to  encourage  regulated  investor-­‐owned  uOliOes  to  reduce  coal   dependence  for  other  fuel  sources,  esp.  natural  gas  and  wind   –  Blaming  EPA  isn’t  going  to  cut  it  –  wind  is  already  lowest  cost  resource  in  much   of  our  region,  pre-­‐regs  affecOng  coal  plants  
  22. 22. Key  QuesOons  /  Discussion   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Wind   –  Costs  too  much?   –  Unreliable?   –  Not  enough  available  and  accessible?   –  Ugly?   –  The  result  of  gov’t  intrusion  and  market  manipulaOon?   –  Unproven  technology  and  source?   –  Represents  ideas/people  we  don’t  trust?   –  What’s  up  with  Community  Wind?   –  Lesser  Prairie  Chickens  and  the  ESA?   –  Tax  abatements,  incenOves,  and  PILOTs?   –  De-­‐commissioning  (or  replacing)  infrastructure  at  end  of  life?   How  do  rural  communiOes  and  stakeholders  (esp.  landowners  and  ratepayers)  get  a  seat  at   the  table  re:  electricity  resource  planning  and  related  economic  development?   What  are  the  opportuniOes/challenges  for  KS  (esp.  rural  KS)  in  a  regional  electricity   marketplace?   What  role  for  wind  (or  other  generaOon  sources)  in  a  regional  electricity  marketplace?   Distributed  vs.  centralized  energy  producOon?   How  do  we  best  manage  change  at  this  scale  and  rate?   How  do  we  (as  community,  state,  interest  group)  make  best  long-­‐term  decisions  here?   How  do  we  remain  open  to  the  best  available  answers/informaOon,  rather  than  pre-­‐ determined  outcomes?  
  23. 23. Wind  is  uniquely  dependent  upon  gov’t  intrusion  and  market  manipulaOon?   Energy Subsidies Black, Not Green A study released by the Environmental Law Institute, a nonpartisan research and policy organization, shows that the federal government has provided substantially larger subsidies to fossil fuels than to renewables. Subsidies to fossil fuels totaled approximately $72 billion over the seven-year study period, while subsidies for renewable fuels totaled $29 billion over the same period. The vast majority of subsidies support energy sources that emit high levels of greenhouse gases when used as fuel. Moreover, just a handful of tax breaks make up the largest portion of subsidies for fossil fuels, with the most significant of these, the Foreign Tax Credit, supporting the overseas production of oil. More than half of the subsidies for renewables are attributable to corn-based ethanol, the use of which, while decreasing American reliance on foreign oil, has generated concern about climate effects.These figures raise the question of whether scarce government funds might be better allocated to move the United States towards a low-carbon economy. Environmental  Law  InsOtute   and  the  Woodrow  Wilson   InternaOonal  Center  for   Scholars;  Es#ma#ng  U.S.   Government  Subsidies  to   Energy  Sources:  2002-­‐2008   Federal Subsidies (2002-08) FOSSIL FUELS RENEWABLE ENERGY $72.5 billion $29.0 billion $12.2 billion $2.3 billion TRADITIONAL RENEWABLES CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE* $0.3 $2.0 $6.0 (outer ring) $53.9 (inner circle) $6.2 $16.3 $5.0 $11.8 $16.8 billion CORN ETHANOL** Climate protecting $70.2 billion TRADITIONAL FOSSIL FUELS Damaging Notes: *Carbon capture and storage is a developing technology that would allow coal-burning utilities to capture and store their carbon dioxide emissions. Although this technology does not make coal a renewable fuel, if successful it would reduce greenhouse gas emissions compared to coal plants that do not use this technology. **Recognizing that the production and use of corn-based ethanol may generate significant greenhouse gas emissions, the data depict renewable subsidies both with and without ethanol subsidies. Sources: Internal Revenue Service, U.S. Department of Energy (Energy Information Administration), Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation, Office of Management and Budget, & U.S. Department of Agriculture, via Environmental Law Institute. Infographic by Tommy McCall For press inquiries contact Brett Kitchen at 202-939-3833. Full report text and pdf of this graphic may be found online at: http://www.eli.org/pressdetail.cfm?ID=205 ©Environmental Law Institute.
  24. 24. What’s up with Community Wind? •  Economies  &  efficiencies  of  scale   –  Available  capital   –  Demand  &  distribuOon  of  electricity   •  Regional  marketplace  &  integraOon   •  Infrastructure   •  Investment  vs.  return   –  Net  metering   –  PPA  terms   •  Leadership  &  policy   –  Self-­‐determinaOon  &  engagement   –  Fuel  source  compeOOon   –  Resource  planning  –  interesOng  quesOons  re:  SPP  integrated  market   •  AWEA  community  wind  resources   –  Community  Wind  Basics   •  hWp://awea.rd.net/Issues/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=4593  
  25. 25. Lesser Prairie Chickens and the ESA? •  December  2012  -­‐  FWS  recommendaOon  to  list  the  lesser-­‐prairie   chicken  as  a  threatened  species.   •  June  2013-­‐    FWS  announced  it  would  delay  finalizing  the  decision  to   list  the  lesser  prairie-­‐chicken  under  the  Endangered  Species  Act   unOl  the  end  of  March  2014.   •  Concerns  over  the  accuracy  of  data,  so  agency  soliciOng  addiOonal   informaOon.   •  According  to  the  results  of  a  seven-­‐year  KSU  study,  wind  power   development  does  not  cause  significant  impacts  to,  and  may  in  fact   benefit,  greater  prairie  chicken  populaOons.   •  AWEA  resources   –  Issues:  Prairie  Chickens  and  Wind  Energy   •  hWp://www.awea.org/Issues/Content.aspx? ItemNumber=834  

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