Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

acvt_corp_id_system_ideation

128 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

acvt_corp_id_system_ideation

  1. 1. AUSTRALIAN CENTRE FOR VISUAL TECHNOLOGIES Corporate identity system - version 01 - week 35 (note: this document is intended for internal use only) List of contents: 1.0 Logo (symbol) 1.1 b/w positive 1.2 b/w negative 1.3 b/w positive with rotation -125° 1.4 b/w positive with rotation -250° 2.0 Logotype (symbol + designation) 2.1 b/w positive 2.2 b/w negative 2.3 logotype font description & origin 2.4 corporate font (sample text layout) 3.0 Logotype with tagline 3.1 b/w positive 100% 3.2 b/w negative 50% 4.0 Logo with initials (Logotag) 4.1 b/w positive 100|50|25% 4.2 b/w negative 100|50|25% 5.0 Corporate colours system (CCS) 5.1 CCS palette (solids) 5.2 CCS palette (gradients) 6.0 Applied CCS 6.1 Logo 6.2 Logotype 6.3 Logotag 7.0 Applications 7.1 Stationery 7.2 PCU applications 7.3 Web _______________________________________________________________________________ Client: Australian Centre for Visual Technology ref: M. Anton Van den Hengel (PhD) anton.vandenhengel@adelaide.edu.au corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006 Introduction: Logo evolution
  2. 2. rotate fig. B_B'_B'' by 22.25 scale B by 82.5%scale B' by 87.5% toggle fig. B_B'_B'' until you achieve the required effect select all the objects and 'divide' or 'cookie-cut' the shape. red parts are removed white parts are expanded to form three shapes. Add to Shape and expandtoggle fig. B_B'_B'' until you achieve the required effect fig. B > 60% fig. B > rotation 120 > copy = fig. B'> rotation 120 > copy = fig. B'' then align top edges of fig. B_B'_B'' to the 3 edges of fig. A ronaldkeller©2007 Australian Centre for Visual Technologies - Logo evolution Client : The University of Adelaide, South Australia DesignER : Ronald Keller
  3. 3. LOGO|1.1 B/W POSITIVE OUTLINE 3pt ROTATION 0° LOGO|1.2 B/W NEGATIVE OUTLINE 3pt ROTATION 0° NOTE: THE LOGO CAN BE ROTATED WHICH CHANGES THE POSITION OF ITS 3 PARTS (A, B & C) AND SLIGHTLY ALTERS ITS BALANCE WITHOUT CHANGING ITS FORM. THIS FEATURE COULD BE USED TO DIFFERENTIATE E.G. DEPARTMENTS WHITHIN THE CENTRE (SEE 1.1.1 & 1.1.2). SECTION 1.0 corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  4. 4. LOGO|1.1.1 B/W POSITIVE OUTLINE 3pt ROTATION -120° LOGO|1.1.2 B/W NEGATIVE OUTLINE 3pt ROTATION -240° SECTION 1.0 corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  5. 5. LOGOTYPE|2.1 B/W POSITIVE OUTLINE 1pt ROTATION 0° DESIGNATION FONT: LTTetria RegularTab (Linotype Tetria Regular Tab) LOGOTYPE|2.2 B/W NEGATIVE OUTLINE 1pt ROTATION 0° DESIGNATION FONT: LTTetria RegularTab (Linotype Tetria Regular Tab) SECTION 2.0 Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Australian Centre for Visual Technologies NOTES: THE DESIGNATION TEXT IS CENTERED IN RELATION TO THE HEIGHT OF THE LOGO. THE DISTANCE BETWEEN THE LOGO AND THE TEXT IS 1/4 OF THE LOGOS WIDTH. THE FONT (TYPEFACE) IS AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE LOGOTYPE AND THE CORPORATE IDENTITY SYSTEM (SEE 2.3). corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  6. 6. LOGOTYPE|2.3 DESIGNATION FONT: LTTetria RegularTab (Linotype Tetria Regular Tab) SECTION 2.0 Australian Centre for Visual Technologies NOTES: THREE VERSIONS OF LINOTYPE TETRIA WERE PURCHASED ONLINE FROM LINOTYPE LIBRARY Gmbh. LICENSE RESTRICTIONS APPLY (THE RELEVANT 'LICENSE AGREEMENT FOR FONT SOFTWARE' DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE AT: http://www.linotype.com/1154/linotypetetria-family.html). THE PURCHASED LICENSE IS VALID FOR THE INSTALLATION AND USE OF LTTETRIA Llight, Regular and Bold ON 20 WORKSTATIONS AND WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE TO ACVT. TO VIEW A SAMPLE OF LINOTYPE TETRIA LIGHT TAB : http://www.linotype.com/1154/linotypetetria-family.html TO VIEW A SAMPLE OF LINOTYPE TETRIA REGULAR TAB : http://www.linotype.com/1154/linotypetetria-family.html TO VIEW A SAMPLE OF LINOTYPE BOLD TAB : http://www.linotype.com/1154/linotypetetria-family.html MORE VERSIONS OF LINOTYPE TETRIA CAN BE VIEWED AND PURCHASED AT: http://www.linotype.com/1154/linotypetetria-family.html. corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  7. 7. LOGOTYPE|2.4 CORPORATE FONT APPLICATION: LINOTYPE TETRIA LIGHT Tab REGULAR Tab BOLD Tab SECTION 2.0 Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Welcome to the Australian Centre for Visual Technologies The Centre aims to promote innovation and education in the use of computer-based technologies for the production and analysis of digital media. The goal is to link creative activity in the digital arts with cutting-edge enabling technologies in computer science. Potential fields of application include Film and Television Production, Computer Games Development, Urban Visualisation, Computer Vision, Augmented Reality, Video Security and Surveillance, Robotics, Data Visualisation and Human-Computer Interfaces. Motivation South Australia is well placed to expand its role in the rapidly growing global industry based on the production and analysis of digital content. Increasing South Australia’ s participation in this sector will require the development of a workforce with the appropriate skill set, and the provision of research support essential to this technologically sophisticated area. Peter Wintonick stated in his report Southern Screens: Southern Stories that "ABS statistics indicate that the creative industries in South Australia employ 15,761 people or 2.5 per cent of total State employment, generating estimated wages of some $640 million, a turnover of $2 billion and contributing almost $1 billion towards gross State product. The related ICT industries employ many more thousands of people." The Centre provides an opportunity to support the development of this burgeoning industry sector within South Australia and boost the state’ s creativity index as described by Mr Wintonick. South Australian Universities have valuable capabilities in the techniques and technologies required within the digital content industry. By developing interdisciplinary and cross-institutional programs The Australian Centre for Visual Technologies aims to provide a world-class resource for a local industry with great potential for growth. corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  8. 8. LOGOTYPE |3.1WITH TAGLINE LOGO: B/W POSITIVE OUTLINE 1pt ROTATION 0° DESIGNATION FONT: 24pt LTTetria RegularTab TAGLINE FONT: 12pt LTTetria LightTab TRACKING +50 LEADING 14pt SECTION 3.0 Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Innovation and education in visual information processing. Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Innovation and education in visual information processing. NOTES: THE DESIGNATION TEXT AND THE TAGLINE ARE CENTERED IN RELATION TO THE HEIGHT OF THE LOGO. THE DISTANCE BETWEEN THE LOGO AND THE TEXT IS 1/4 OF THE LOGOS WIDTH. THE TAGLINE IN THE SAMPLE BELOW IS AT 6pt IN TEXT SIZE, IT IS NOT RECOMMENDED TO GO BELOW. LOGOTYPE |3.2WITH TAGLINE LOGO: B/W POSITIVE OUTLINE 0.75pt ROTATION 0° DESIGNATION FONT: 12pt LTTetria RegularTab TAGLINE FONT: 6pt LTTetria LightTab TRACKING +50 LEADING 7.5pt corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  9. 9. LOGO WITH |4.1INITIALS LOGO: B/W POSITIVE 3pt ROUND BRUSH 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° INITIALS: B/W POSITIVE 3pt ROUND BRUSH 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° SECTION 4.0 NOTES: THE FIELD OF APPLICATIONS OF A LOGO WITH INITIALS ARE DIVERSE. IT CAN BE TREATED AS A TAG OR A SIGNET. LOGO WITH |4.2INITIALS LOGO: B/W NEGATIVE 3pt ROUND BRUSH 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° INITIALS: B/W POSITIVE 3pt ROUND BRUSH 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  10. 10. COLOUR|5.1 PRIMARY COLOURS PALETTE SECONDARY COLOURS PALETTE NOTES: COLOURS DEPICTED IN THIS PRESENTATION ARE FOR VISUALISATION PURPOSES ONLY. CONSULT YOUR PANTONETM OR PROCESS COLOUR SWATCH WHEN MATCHING COLOURS FOR DESIGN APPLICATIONS. CMYK VALUES ARE SUBJECT TO VARIATIONS. RGB VALUES REFER TO THE HEXADECIMAL WEB COLOUR CHART. (*) SOURCE: https://webdev.adelaide.edu.au/vi2/elements/logo/reproduction/ SECTION 5.0 1* 2 3 Pantone 294 U 293 U 292 U CMYK C100|M80|K20 C100|M60|Y10 C50|M10|K5 Web RGB C|46|89 F|55|A4 99|BC|DF 4* 5* 6 Pantone 485 M 873 M BLACK M CMYK M100|Y90 M30|Y100|K30 Web RGB D2|19|17 AC|9F|6A COLOUR|5.2 GRADIENT PALETTE Radial Blue Linear Blue Pantone 292 U CMYK C50|M10|K5 Web RGB 99|BC|DF & Pantone 294 U CMYK C100|M80|K20 Web RGB C|46|89 Radial white to black (50%) Linear white to black (50%) Pantone Black M CMYK K100 Web RGB 0|0|0 & White corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  11. 11. LOGO|6.1.0 TRI-BLUE OUTLINE 1pt ROTATION 0° |-120° |-240° SECTION 6.0 LOGO|6.1.1 LINEAR BLUE GRADIENT OUTLINE 1pt ROTATION 0° |-120° |-240° LOGO|6.1.2 RADIAL BLUE GRADIENT OUTLINE 0.25pt ROTATION 0° |-120° |-240° 6.1.0.1 6.1.0.2 6.1.0.3 6.1.1.1 6.1.1.2 6.1.1.3 6.1.2.1 6.1.2.2 6.1.2.3 6.1.3.1 6.1.3.2 6.1.3.3 LOGO|6.1.3 LINEAR B/W GRADIENT OUTLINE 0.25pt ROTATION 0° |-120° |-240° 6.1.4.1 6.1.4.2 6.1.4.3 LOGO|6.1.4 RADIAL B/W GRADIENT OUTLINE 0.25pt ROTATION 0° |-120° |-240° corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  12. 12. LOGOTYPE|6.2.0 TRI-BLUE LOGO OUTLINE 0.75pt ROTATION 0° LTTetria RegularTab SECTION 6.0 Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Australian Centre for Visual Technologies LOGOTYPE|6.2.1 LINEAR BLUE GRADIENT OUTLINE 0.75pt ROTATION 0° LTTetria RegularTab LOGOTYPE|6.2.3 MONOCHROME BLUE OUTLINE 1pt ROTATION 0° LTTetria RegularTab LOGOTYPE|6.2.4 BICHROME BLUE & BLACK OUTLINE 1pt ROTATION 0° LTTetria RegularTab Australian Centre for Visual Technologies LOGOTYPE|6.2.2 RADIAL BLUE GRADIENT OUTLINE 0.25pt ROTATION 0° LTTetria RegularTab Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Innovation and education in visual information processing. Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Innovation and education in visual information processing. corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  13. 13. LOGOTAG |6.3.0 MONOCHROME BLUE 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° SECTION 6.0 LOGOTAG |6.3.1 MONOCHROME RED 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° LOGOTAG |6.3.2 MONOCHROME GOLD 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° LOGOTAG |6.3.0 RADIAL BLUE GRADIENT 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° LOGOTAG |6.3.0 LINEAR BLUE GRADIENT 1pt WEIGHT ROTATION 0° corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  14. 14. STATIONERY |7.1.0 CALLING CARD W90/H50 mm FRONT BACK SECTION 7.0 Innovation and education in visual information processing. Australian Centre for Visual Technologies School of Computer Science Plaza Building The University of Adelaide SA 5005 Australia +61 (0)8 8303 5586 +61 (0)8 8303 4366 a c v t @ a c v t . co m . a u w w w . a c v t . c o m . a u Anton Van den Hengel PHD STATIONERY |7.1.1 COURTESY CARD W210/H99 mm FRONT 75% School of Computer Science | Plaza Building | The University of Adelaide | Adelaide, SA 5005 | Australia +61 (0)8 8303 5586 | +61 (0)8 8303 4366 | acvt@acvt.com.au | www.acvt.com.au | Innovation and education in visual information processing. corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  15. 15. STATIONERY |7.1.3 A4 LETTER W210/H297 mm SHOWN AT 75% SECTION 7.0 School of Computer Science | Plaza Building | The University of Adelaide | Adelaide, SA 5005 | Australia +61 (0)8 8303 5586 | +61 (0)8 8303 4366 | acvt@acvt.com.au | www.acvt.com.au | Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Innovation and education in visual information processing. Innovation and education in visual information processing. corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  16. 16. CPU (SCREEN) |7.2.0 POWERPOINT BGD TEMPLATE W297/H210 mm SHOWN AT 50% SECTION 7.0 WEB (SCREEN) |7.3.0 BANNER BGD TEMPLATE W600/H120 PIXELS 72DPI SHOWN AT 75% Australian Centre for Visual Technologies Innovation and education in visual information processing. corporate identity project / ACVT / system / 29.08.2006 / Ronald Keller©2006
  17. 17. ­ 17 ­ ·  Part III  case study  1) Assignment and constraints  As a graphic design practitioner one often engages with a new project as a doctor would with a new  patient ; the practice involves the assessment of a design issue which needs to be solved and implies  an understanding of the existing parameters along which a new system of visual communication  can be built and implemented. The degree of input, requirements, and interference that comes with  each assignment depends on a large number of variables ranging from the personal involvement of  a client to elaborate marketing objectives. In this particular case, the initial oral briefing was rather  concise consisting of only a few guidelines or prerequisites and some elementary constraints. The  brief put forward the following constraints: the designation of the entity as the “Australian Centre  for Visual Technologies” and the integration of a secondary descriptive headline or tagline  “Innovation and education in visual information processing” as well as the use or at least the  emulation of the University of Adelaide’s existing color palette (fig.1).  Figure 1  Subsequent to the initial brief, a period of gestation or ideation moved the project into its  conceptual phase. A concept outline was then formulated to situate the creative intention and how it  might relate to communication objectives and the entity’s profile.  Please refer to “appendix 1” to review the initial briefing report, visual identity objectives and  shape exploration (this document was submitted to the client in week 26).
  18. 18. ­ 18 ­  2) Language and vocabulary  “As a metaphor, the term ‘grammar’ when used with ‘designs’ draws attention to elements and to  rules that specify how those elements may be combined or altered to form members in a corpus of  designs.” (Bruton and Radford 2004) 12  In ‘Bending Rules’ 13  Bruton and Radford develop the notion of grammars of art and design and  make a case for contingency in reflective practice. As they examine the interplay of rules and  contingency it becomes clear that purpose and intuition are deeply intertwined in the practice of  design, and that this correlation is a catalyst for creativity. Purpose is at the source of the design  process because it is concerned with the objectives outlined in a concept. Contingency is the  variable that will trigger singularities of creative actions outside of the perimeter defined by rules.  By definition, such actions are intuitive because the events that triggered them are implicitly  contingent. This is a bipolar dynamic and the best metaphor I can think of to illustrate this balance  is to compare Purpose to direction, Intuition to speed and Process to a trajectory.  Just as a point is both the beginning and the end of a line 14  so can the creative act be found both at  the start and at the end of a creative process. In fact, the creative act occurs throughout the creative  process and does not cease until it is consummated.  “In the creative act, the artist goes from intention to realization through a chain of totally  subjective reactions. His struggle toward the realization is a series of efforts, pains, satisfactions,  refusals, decisions, which also cannot and must not be fully self­conscious, at least not on the  esthetic plane.” (Marcel Duchamp) 15  At first glance it seems somewhat contradictory to evoke both ‘a chain of totally subjective  reactions’ on one hand and a ‘series of efforts, pains, decisions, etc.’ on the other to describe a  succession of creative actions. However, I would argue that if you would make a distinction  between creative action and creative process, intuition and intention can complement rather than  oppose each other and so perhaps achieve a balance between the ‘not fully self­conscious’ act so  dear to Duchamp and the deliberate act. Arguably, an intuitive act becomes deliberate once it is  applied but this does not mean that it becomes an integral part of the process. It is crucial however  to reference all these actions and record all instances of contingent occurrences and the actions they  demand. The record of such a reflective practice is extremely valuable as it notably offers insights
  19. 19. ­ 19 ­  into the idea of the ‘not fully self­conscious’ creative act Duchamp refers to. In effect, a reflective  practice relies on a reflective journal where the creative process is recorded; a vocabulary of  elements generated by a set of rules within the framework of a grammar is thus created. The  creative ‘journey’ which precedes the artwork is diverse, it can be contained in the single brush  stroke of a calligraphy master or apply to the long gestation and elaboration of an architectural  project. One artist uses a vocabulary of brushes, inks, motions and scrolls to apply his strokes, the  other uses a vocabulary of shapes, volumes and landscapes to achieve his goal. Whatever the  medium might be the external reality or meaning of the artwork will pervade the physical existence  of the artwork, it exists because we recognize it.  3) The design concept  Since the core activity of this entity is described as a ‘centre for visual technology’ I opted to  develop a representational logo which references, or is at least evocative of graphical optical  illusion devices.  Figure 2
  20. 20. ­ 20 ­  I willingly excluded all other options to privilege the relationship between the words ‘visual’ and  ‘optical’ by associating their meaning within the same plane. My decision relies on the metonymic  link 16  between a paradigm of graphical optical illusion devices (see fig.2) and the syntactic  designation of the entity, in particular the inherent meaning of the word ‘visual’.  As an example or precedent for the triadic relationship between a logo, a designation and an entity  we can first look at the original Nestle crest or logo (fig.3.1). It consists of a figurative illustration  of a bird’s nest on a branch, housing two birdlings being tended to by a full­grown bird. It is  important to note that the word ‘nestle’ is actually German for ‘a small nest’ as this allows for the  relationship between the word itself and the logo to exist, as a metonym, on the same plane of  ‘meaning’. The image denotes one thing but as a metonym it also stands for other related meanings.  The picturesque quality of the image, the instinctive nurturing characteristics of a female bird  tending to its offspring and the sheltering nest are all devices that serve the purpose of enhancing a  metaphorical mechanism when they are associated to the representation of the entity’s values and  activities. By comparison, the equally famous Apple or Shell logos (fig.3) also have a built­in  metonymic relationships because the ‘word’ and the ‘image’ or ‘pictograph’ are on the same plane  of ‘meaning’ and are meant to stand for a whole. However, by associating the logo to an entity the  inherent qualities contained in the metonym’s representation of reality are transposed from one  plane of reality to another and become part of a metaphorical device.  Figure 3  “Each metaphor can be traced back to a subjacent chain of metonymic connections which  constitute the framework of the code and upon which is based the constitution of any semantic field,  whether partial or (in theory) global.” (Umberto Eco, The Role of the Reader: Explorations in the  Semiotics of Texts, 1979, translated by William Weaver, 1983)
  21. 21. ­ 21 ­  When a sign is extracted from a paradigm of pictographs to be reassigned as a logo, its metonymic  qualities are subdued in favor of a new meaning which usually relies on a metaphorical mechanism.  Regardless of a metonymic relationship between a pictogram and a designation (word), the implied  associative relationship between pictogram/designation and the entity is often arbitrary.  In the case of the ‘Australian Centre for Visual Technologies’, the objective is to associate an  abstract yet evocative pictograph to a quite literal formulation of the entity’s activities. The  metonymical relationship between the pictograph and the designation retrieves a set of associated  attributes and delivers them as a metaphor to stand for the entity thus creating an independent logo  with its own intrinsic meaning. In this particular case, my strategy is to create an evocative rather  than representational logo in relation to the words ‘visual’ and ‘technology’ by using an element  from a paradigm of graphical optical illusions to stand as a metonym and deliver meaning as a  metaphor. From these theoretical implications of a design concept based on a communication  strategy it is now time to move into the creative process.  4) Methodology and grammar  In order to regulate the creative process, a set or system of methods, principles, and rules needs to  be established. The nature, complexity and range of application of a methodology will vary from  one design practitioner to another and from one design case to another. In this context, rules and  methods will situate the design process within a constrictive and generative frame. The constrictive  nature of the process will naturally generate purposeful derivations as well as contingent events.  My initial set of rules was devised to produce an array of derivations based on a selection from the  initial paradigm of graphical optical illusions. In effect, I selected and reproduced 5 elements (fig.4)  from the initial paradigm of graphical optical illusions on a vector­based computer program.  Figure 4
  22. 22. ­ 22 ­  Each element displays a particular combination of graphical attributes and devices operating within  the same paradigmatic plane. By using principles of derivative shape grammar in conjunction to  applying the colors palette (fig.1) I generated 15 variations or derivations per element (fig.5). These  derivations are part of a new set of elements that can now be referred to as a vocabulary of elements  generated by a particular set of rules. While the initial selection from the paradigm emulates  graphical attributes related to specific optical illusions, the newly generated set of vocabulary is  original and diverse.
  23. 23. ­ 23 ­  Part IV  derivative design  1) Creative process analysis  Element 4.1  The graphical attributes of element 4.1 can be described as a square shape duplicated and scaled in  regular increments from its center, with each new square adopting a different and progressive hue  to achieve an effect of optical illusion such as depth or relief.  Figure 5.1 shows the progression of the derivative design process in numerical sequence. In the first  derivative instance 5.1.1 the central shape is changed to a circle, in reference to the metonym  identified previously, and follows 6 incremental steps changing both in scale and in shape to  become the outer square.  Figure 5.1  The next string of derivative instances, from 5.1.2 to 5.1.9, explores variations of color, hue and  rotation. A significant change occurs at the level of instance 5.1.10 as the central shape reverts to a  square and the outer shape to a circle with an incremental rotation added to the incremental change
  24. 24. ­ 24 ­  in scale and shape. Subsequent changes repeat the explorations of color, hue and incremental shape  alterations (5.1.11 to 5.1.15).  Element 4.2  The graphical attributes of element 4.2 are based on the superposition of 6 equilateral triangles,  their subsequent equidistant displacement and their partial subtraction which produced three  identical shapes on three different rotational increments. The achieved optical effect can be  described as the suggestion of a 3 dimensional construction from a 2 dimensional point of view  based on three identical and intertwined objects revolving around a centre point.  Figure 5.2  The first derivative instance in Figure 5.2 has had color applied to it while the second instance has  also been rotated. Derivative instance 5.2.4 introduces a gradient blend into the color palette which  further enhances the optical illusion effect. The next significant change occurs in step 5.2.7 where a  beziers curve tool was used to curb all the segments of the shape; in step 5.2.10, the curved shape  was subtracted from the original triangle to produce an new instance which was then returned to the  triadic construction as a substitute for the original shape. This new array of derivative instances
  25. 25. ­ 25 ­  however does not retain the same graphical attributes as the previous instances and in step 5.2.11 a  contingent event comes to light, the new shape can be perceived as a stylized letter. It could stand  as a symbol for the letter A, C and/or V which coincidentally are part of the initials of the  ‘Australian Centre for Visual Technologies’. In the last derivative instance 5.2.15 a fourth shape is  finally added to represent the T letter and the color palette is used to balance the construction.  In this series there were 2 major turning points where decisions were made to bend the rules in  order to privilege contingent events and explore new instances of perceptive shape grammar.  Element 4.3  The core attributes of the initial element rely on the relationship between two vertical segments of  the same length. When these segments are in position between two pairs of opposed diagonal  segments, one of them appears to be shorter. The original element 4.3 is contained in a frame and  its vertical segments are sitting on the edges of a sequence of opposed trapezoidal shapes.  Figure 5.3  Derivative instance 5.3.1 simply eliminates the two main vertical segments; reverting the element to  an optical illusion based on trapezoidal properties, while instances 5.3.2 and 5.3.3 retrieve the
  26. 26. ­ 26 ­  original relationship between the trapezoidal shapes and the vertical segments. In derivative  instance 5.3.4 an important change occurs, as the two vertical segments are substituted by dots or  filled circles in reference to the metonymic relationship between ‘visual’, ‘optical’ and ‘circle’ (or  oval ­ as a shapes). In terms of focal intensity and balance, this new configuration retains some of  the attributes of the initial version. However, this similarity is lost in instance 5.3.5, when one of the  circular shapes is removed and the focal point becomes singular. The next turning point occurs as  the remaining circular element is also removed and vivid colors are added to further enhance the  trapezoidal shape configuration (5.3.9). The circle shape returns in instance 5.3.11 and again  becomes a strong feature, first as a singular focal point then as a dual focal point (5.3.12); note that  the sequence or combination of colors slightly shifts the perceptual balance of the configuration.  Once the frame is removed (5.3.13) a further perceptual alteration occurs as the trapezoidal shapes  and the circles seem to flatten and take on a more horizontal character which is also due to the  combination of colors. Finally, in derivative instances 5.3.14 and 5.3.15, the trapezoidal shape at  the center of the configuration is entirely removed and the circles subtracted to enhance the optical  ‘suggestion’ created by the space between the left and the right trapezoid.  Element 4.4  This powerful triadic configuration is composed of three circles and a triangle. The center point of  each circle is placed on a different corner of the triangle so that the circles are equidistant from each  other. The triangle is then subtracted from the circles and the space left between them validates the  suggestion of the triangular shape.  With color applied to them, the first three derivative instances ( 5.4.1, 5.4.2 and 5.4.3) still retain all  the attributes of the original element 4.4. It is noticeable however, that instance 5.4.3 is not as  balanced as its predecessors, due to a proportional reduction of space between the circles. Instance  5.4.4 references the idea of a metonymic link between ‘visual’, ‘optical’ and ‘circle’ and breaks up  the sequence but should not be considered as a turning point even if it. Derivative instance 5.4.5  retrieves the original configuration but changes the perceptual balance because contrasting colors  were added to the subtracted triangle parts intersecting with the circles. The next derivative instance  5.4.6 is similar to instance 5.4.4 in that it retrieves the same metonymic theme as a concentric focal  point; in this instance however its relationship to the original element 4.4. is evident as it swaps the  position of the triangle with that of the circles.  An important turning point occurs, as instance 5.4.7 again reverts to the original configuration of  shapes, when the proportions of all three circles are altered while their original positioning is
  27. 27. ­ 27 ­  maintained. The suggested and perceived surface of the triangle is not influenced by the change in  proportion of the circles in fact it is identical to instance 5.4.1.  Figure 5.4  As a direct consequence, instance 5.4.10 stands out as the next turning point where one of the  circles is placed in front of the triangle and finally changes its suggested surface. This configuration  is explored further in derivative instances 5.4.11 and 5.4.12 where the triadic relationship between  the circles becomes the dominant feature and the suggested triangle becomes a malleable space.  The last three instances (5.4.13, 5.4.14 and 5.4.15) take advantage of this new configuration as a  concentric hierarchy is applied to the circles and the suggested triangle is used to subtract space  from this new circular shape.  Element 4.5  The core attributes of this element rely on the relationship between two identical circles. The  configuration of the initial element 4.5 is based on the optical illusion that is achieved by placing  the two identical circles at the centre of two different constellations of scaled circles. By straining  the proportions of one constellation to be superior and the other to be inferior in size to the identical
  28. 28. ­ 28 ­  circles, one can affect their perceptual qualities. The constellation of superior circles will make the  original circle appear smaller where as the constellation of inferior circles will make the original  circle seem larger in comparison. Note that one constellation validates the other and that they will  not stand as optical illusions if the two identical circles are not in a comparative relationship.  The use of circular shapes throughout this string of syntactic elements naturally refers to the  metonymic relationship I have identified earlier.  Figure 5.5  Color is applied to derivative instance 5.5.1 and the constellation of smaller circles is aligned  horizontally with its counterpart, which seems to reduce the perception of an optical effect. Instance  5.5.2 marks a turning point as one of the circles from the larger constellation is replaced by the  smaller constellation with the result that the optical effect is flawed. In instance 5.5.3 the original  configuration is abandoned and in derivative instance 5.5.4 it changes dramatically to become  triadic and concentric, using both size and color to create a balance which emphatically imposes an  analogy to the human eye. Instance 5.5.5 abandons the concentric rule for an asymmetrical structure  shifting the balance from horizontal to diagonal, with a central focal point. Only one of the three  sub­elements is retained in instance 5.5.6 and a new optical effect is added, first as a reflection  (5.5.7 and 5.5.8) and then as a graphical element (5.5.9). The next three instances are concerned
  29. 29. ­ 29 ­  with the eccentric positioning of a number of circles both, inside (5.5.10 and 5.5.11) and outside  (5.5.12) of a larger circle, while the main derivative feature of instances 5.5.13, 5.5.14 and 5.5.15 is  the use of a gradient color making the circular elements seem spherical.  2) A vocabulary of derivative instances  The objective at this stage of the design process was to provide the client with a range of graphical  instances of a design concept and once the appropriate language for the design concept was  outlined, a number of derivative vocabulary items were generated.  Figure 6
  30. 30. ­ 30 ­  As a graphic sign, each item or instance can stand on its own; however, to exist as a vocabulary  item it must be part of a system. The process that spawned these instances is based on an array of  associations, metaphors and metonymic relationships which were synthesized into a design concept.  The result is a graphical vocabulary of 75 connotative signs. The value of each sign depends on its  relation to other signs within its system and is in fact determined as much by what it is, than by  what it is not 17  .  It is also important to acknowledge the ambiguity of some of these signs, not the least because the  system of signs cannot be exhaustive and originates from an arbitrary selection of signs, itself  extracted from a paradigm of graphical optical illusions.  Each sign or instance derives from a particular set of attributes, which references the basic  metonymic relationship that lies at the core of the design concept. Consequently, each graphical  configuration is an exploration of these attributes and naturally, some are more successful than  others; in this context discrepancies between original graphical attributes and remaining attributes  are emphatic and should be considered as an integral and indeed crucial part of this particular  design process.
  31. 31. ­ 31 ­ ·  Part V  from sign to logo  1) Derivative instance 5.2.9  The objective up to this point was to produce a consistent if not exhaustive vocabulary of signs,  whose individual and distinctive graphical attributes could visually represent the entity. Once the  vocabulary of graphical derivations was produced, it was presented to the client and one vocabulary  item or derivative instance was selected as a place­holder for the new ACVT logo.  I should mention that in this particular case, I chose not to interfere or confer with the client about  the choice that was made nor did I remove or favor any of the instances as I felt that it was  important for the subsequent case study to rely on an ‘impartial’ selection.  Derivative instance 5.2.9 was thus selected:  The selection of this particular derivative instance effectively implies the selection of its graphical  attributes and qualities. Furthermore, its attributes and qualities are directly related to the initial  element 4.2 (below).
  32. 32. ­ 32 ­  2) Construction sequence and configuration of shapes  In order to understand the core attributes, both graphical and perceptual (as relating to the paradigm  of optical illusions) of this element, it is essential to refer to the construction sequence and  configuration of shapes as shown in Figure 7.  Figure 7  The informal description of element 4.2.:  The  graphical  attributes  of  element  4.2  are  based  on  the  superposition  of  6  equilateral triangles, their subsequent equidistant displacement and their partial  subtraction which  produced  three identical shapes on three  different rotational  increments. The achieved optical effect can be described as the suggestion of a 3  dimensional  construction  from  a  2  dimensional  point  of  view  based  on  three  identical and intertwined objects revolving around a centre point.  Figure 8 recapitulates the construction sequence of derivative instance 5.2.9. (it is understated that  like all the other derivative instances, instance 5.2.9 should not be considered as a “finished” sign  but rather as a rough sketch).  It becomes apparent that the original shape’s (8.1) graphical and perceptual attributes are essentially  three identical (8.2) and intertwined objects revolving around a centre point. So, by applying a rule  where straight lines are changed into curves without displacing anchor­points by means of the  Beziers curve tool, a new derivative instance is produced. As a result of the intervention (see 8.3,  8.4 and 8.5), the shape of the object moves away from the stern and grounded configuration of the
  33. 33. ­ 33 ­  original element and introduces a softer, smoother visual flow without forfeiting any of the  attributes relating to the perception of this particular optical effect.  Figure 8  The occurrence or event, which produced instance 5.2.9  was summarized in  these terms:  The next significant change occurs in step 5.2.7 where the Beziers curve tool  was used to curb all the segments of the shape…  Please refer to “appendix 2” to review the corporate identity development report, the refined  version of instance 5.2.9 and its final version (this report was submitted to the client in week 33).  3) Refine and conquer  It was mentioned earlier that derivative instance 5.2.9, despite its graphical and perceptual qualities,  is considered a rough sketch which implies that it needs to be refined before its representational  meaning can be shifted from an instance to a sign and from a sign to a logo.  Figure 9 is a visual recapitulation, which links the initial element 4.2 (or 9.1 in Fig. 9) to its final  version as a sign (9.8). All the configurations in this sequence are related to 9.1 and are derivative  instances of 9.2. As such they retain all the inherent attributes of 9.2 and consequently the residual  attributes of 9.1. However, the refining process demanded a new exploration of shape versus space  and as a consequence the basic rule which spawned 5.2.9 was redefined.
  34. 34. ­ 34 ­  Figure 9  The step between 9.2 and 9.3 was to be the determining event that eventually led to a  reconsideration of the basic rule “where straight lines are changed into curves without displacing  anchor­point  by means of the Beziers curve tool”. It wasn’t the desired effect of the rule which  became questionable, but rather its modus operandi. I identified two reasons for this.  The first reason was that it became very difficult to produce a curved shape that could be assembled  into a balanced triadic configuration (as in Fig. 7). The second reason was that since the initial  element was based on an equilateral triangle, it seemed more appropriate to revert to the original  shape and start the refining process at the core rather than from a derived shape (8.2 from fig. 8).  I decided to rethink the construction of my configuration of shapes without compromising the  desired graphical and perceptual attributes of derivative instance 5.2.9.  A further exploration, this time involving the construction method rather than derivative instances,  took place. Instances 9.4 to 9.7 are the result of inconclusive variations that eventually led to the  final construction method displayed and described in figure 10.
  35. 35. ­ 35 ­  Figure 10  The equilateral triangle is the starting point. All three anchor­points are modified using the Beziers  curve tool. It is noticeable that the anchor­point sitting at the top of the triangle is modified on a  horizontal axis while its lateral counterparts are modified on a vertical axis. The obtained shape is  to be the outline of the final sign.  Next, I needed a subsidiary shape that could be used as a “cookie­cutter” shape. I used the same  technique as before though applying slightly different parameters. The amplitude of the Beziers  curve tool effect was increased and instead of following a vertical axis, the lateral anchor­points  were modified on mirrored diagonals constrained to 45 degrees.  The grey shape (cookie­cutter shape) was then reduced to 60% of its original size and its apex point  placed on top of its counterpart from the white shape (outline shape).  This operation was repeated  twice and the resulting duplicates applied to the two remaining anchor­points.
  36. 36. ­ 36 ­  The next few steps involve purely intuitive actions that are the result of a number of unsatisfactory  attempts and contingent events. Eventually, I found that by rotating each grey shape by 22.25  degrees out of its position, I could enhance the optical effect by giving it a sense of direction. This  action was enhanced further by incrementally modifying the size of the grey shapes. The top grey  shape was reduced to 82.5 % of its size, and the grey shape on the left was reduced to 87.5 % of its  size. Subsequently, I toggled the three cookie­cutter shapes into a satisfactory position.  With the cookie­cutters in place, I made them intersect with the white shape. I then removed the  protruding shapes, marked in red, and reassembled the remaining shapes into a triadic  configuration.  Finally, we can compare the original element and the refined sign and ponder the implications of a  purposeful creative process driven by specific visual communication objectives but pervaded by  intuitive actions resulting from contingent events.
  37. 37. ­ 37 ­  Figure 11  Both configurations are triadic and wholesome in that they are complete and balanced. If we were  to simplify these signs to the extreme, it is likely that we would draw a simple triangle sitting on its  base, and that would summarize the essence of their likeliness and kinship in terms of shape.  In terms of perceptual qualities, as pertaining to graphical attributes related to optical illusions,  there are undeniable similarities, the circular flow, the evasiveness of the focal point, the suggestion  of depth and negative space and the ambiguous wholesomeness that pervades them.  Eventually, I would also like to discuss the obvious differences between these two signs; but at this  point in the report, I would like to avoid reflecting on such an unfortunate affair and would rather  leave it to your imagination.  4) Corporate identity system  Please refer to appendix 4, featuring a substantial corporate identity system which was delivered to  the client at the end of the project, to review a variety of graphical applications including  typography, stationery, digital media applications and derivative signets.
  38. 38. ­ 38 ­  Afterword  Finally,  in  2002  I  had  a  chance  to  visit  an  exhibition  entitled  “Mark  Rothko:  A  consummated  experience  between  picture  and  onlooker”  at  the  Beyeler  Foundation 18  in  Basel.  As  I  wandered  through the gallery, my first encounter with his work came to mind.  This time however, the physical and extra­physical manifestation of Rothko’s artwork impressed  me tremendously.  As  I  contemplated  this  retrospective  of his oeuvre, absorbing  the  fleeting  and  vibrant texture of space, effectively reflecting on the relationship between picture and spectator, I  could  very  well  sense  the  realm  beneath  the  canvas  and  the  weight  of  a  consummate  reflective  practice.  Produced and written by Ronald Keller.  November 2006, Adelaide, South Australia  Please also note that this report is not meant to be an exhaustive analysis of the creative process in  relation to this project and that I reserve the exclusive right to ad to this report in the future.  RonaldKeller©2006
  39. 39. ­ 39 ­  “What I say reinforces how I see. There is meaning in both”  Georges Stiny  SHAPE  Talking about Seeing and Doing  p. 20  The MIT Press  Cambridge, Massachusetts  London, England  ©2006
  40. 40. ­ 40 ­  1  The End of Print: the Graphic Design of David Carson by Blackwell and Carson (Chronicle Books, 1995)  2  The Graphic Language of Neville Brody by Brody and Wozencroft (Thames and Hudson, 1994)  3  John Brumfield, B.A. California Institute of the Arts, M.A. UC Berkeley, M.F.A. CSU Los Angeles. Photographer, writer – currently  Faculty Member at the Media Design Program at ACCD, Pasadena  4 4  Introduction to communication theory by John Fiske: p.115 – 1982, Routledge, London  5  excerpt from the ACVT website: http://www.acvt.com.au/  6  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Paleolithic  7  Introduction to communication theory by John Fiske – 1982, Routledge, London  8  "semiotics." WordNet® 2.0. Princeton University. 17 Oct. 2006. <Dictionary.com  9  Introduction to communication theory by John Fiske: p.115 – 1982, Routledge, London  10  Introduction to communication theory by John Fiske – 1982, Routledge, London  11  Saussure, Ferdinand de ([1916] 1983): Course in General Linguistics (trans. Roy Harris). London: Duckworth  12  Bending Rules by Bruton and Radford – excerpt from Grammar and Rules (draft at May 2004)  13  Bending Rules by Bruton and Radford (draft at May 2004)  14  Islamic Patterns by Keith Critchlow (London, Thames and Hudson, 1976)  15  The essential writings of  Marcel Duchamp: Marchand du Sel, edited by Sanouillet and Peterson (London, Thames and Hudson, 1975)  16  Umberto Eco, The Role of the Reader: Explorations in the Semiotics of Texts, 1979  17  Saussure, Ferdinand de ([1916] 1983): Course in General Linguistics (trans. Roy Harris). London:    Duckworth and Saussure,  Ferdinand de ([1916] 1974): Course in General Linguistics (trans. Wade Baskin). London: Fontana/Collins  18  http://www.beyeler.com ­ Mark Rothko: A consummated experience between picture and onlooker 18.02/29.06. 2001 – Fondation  Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland

×