Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Accepted	
  Grant	
  Proposal	
  
May	
  2010	
  	
  
University	
  of	
  Arizona,	
  Honors	
  College	
  
Richard Alan R...
Dear Board Members,
My proposed research will be conducted in Oaxaca, Mexico under the supervision of Dr.
Downing, an inte...
These questions and research aims will be addressed while investigating in Oaxaca.
However, it’s also important to outline...
WEEK
S
 Through Dr. Cruz, confirmed two doctors whom anticipate working with me.
 Registered for the Responsible Conduct...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Successful grant proposal (University of Arizona Honors College)

Successful grant proposal (University of Arizona Honors College)

  • Be the first to comment

Successful grant proposal (University of Arizona Honors College)

  1. 1. Accepted  Grant  Proposal   May  2010     University  of  Arizona,  Honors  College   Richard Alan Russell
  2. 2. Dear Board Members, My proposed research will be conducted in Oaxaca, Mexico under the supervision of Dr. Downing, an internationally recognized social-development researcher at the University of Arizona. Through an on campus federal work-study program, I have worked with Dr. Downing for the last three years on different issues including development forced displacement and resettlement and its impacts on project affected people. While working with Dr. Downing on these projects concerning either underprivileged or inadequately represented persons, I began to discover the uniqueness, vastness and diverse wealth of knowledge of native cultures, often razed in pursuit of development. This discovery combined with my future goal of becoming a medical practitioner both led to my current interest in traditional and westernized medicine in Oaxaca. With the granted financial support, given the limited time and my limited resources, my intention is to focus on the current allopathic doctor and citizen understanding of their unique pluralistic healthcare system. Cheleen Mahar Higgins finds a high degree of similarity in her research to explain “illness definitions and diagnosis with regards to the Folk and Western medical systems.”1 My research intends to provide an updated account that is similar to this, but instead of looking at illness definitions and diagnosis, stratum variables will be the focus. The two variables of both wealth and education will be isolated, to see if they relate or affect an individual’s definition of traditional or westernized medicine. To do this, I will analyze and record the degree to which Oaxacan people of different socio-economic status rate and value these treatment types. It will also be important to inquire into why the value and rating differences exist or do not exist. Currently, my ability to achieve these goals and answer these questions needs to be further refined, and upon arrival I will intently observe the people while also acclimating to the foregin environment (as instructed to so by Dr. Downing) because in order to properly address these questions a refined understanding of the culture and ethnoscience of Oaxaca needs to be garnered in a natural, unobtrusive fashion. In support of this notion, Peter Giovannini and Michael Heinrich state that “an approach that goes beyond the externally imposed dichotomic categories [of one’s customs]…can be very useful to shed light on other dimensions that underlie the use of medicines.”2 My aptitude will hopefully expand; however my overarching research aims will remain constant. My holistic research aims are threefold. First and foremost, this investigation seeks to report from the definitions, terms, stories, ideas and perspective of the individuals directly living and interacting within this pluralistic system. Second, to capture a single cultural-temporal reference frame, depicting the essence of how the individual persons of Oaxaca—specifically the citizens living in or near the capital city Oaxaca de Juárez— place value on and actually utilize their unique healthcare treatment options. Third, attempt to elucidate basic underlying trends within the sample population regarding stratum, which individuals might not be unaware of.
  3. 3. These questions and research aims will be addressed while investigating in Oaxaca. However, it’s also important to outline procedures for relevant data collection and interpretation from the field. The proposed methodology involves mostly qualitative fieldwork. According to Paul Leedy’s Practical Research, Planning and Design3 and consensus among additional resources, the nature of the research topic determines what scientific approach will be most effective, and large cultural components encompassed by my topic, dictate qualitative analysis. Straightforward description will dominate the first half of my investigation because when first introduced into the new culture, many social and cultural norms will conspicuously seem strange, and I’ll experience a temporary heightening of awareness (described by Dr. Downing), which can best be recorded in detailed, accurate description. Another portion of my first month methodology, improving my Spanish communication abilities and my other socializing tools, like body language interpretation, while also studying 30 hours per week at the Instituto Cultural Oaxaca (ICO) in a specialized program that involves interaction with healthcare professionals to improve medical terminology and overall fluency. This means, improvement upon literal Spanish, upon regionally specific aspects of Oaxacan Spanish usage and upon subtler components of communication formulate the first step of the methodology because one of my major research aims is to report from the Oaxacan people’s terms. The second half of my stay will be devoted to the qualitative research techniques known as: free listing, structured interviewing, questionnaires and surveying. Free listing is a great method to define the lexicon domain germane to a specific topic in a specific culture, and this highlights common terms for use in surveys and structured interviews et cetera. I will sample from the private, public, and traditional sectors of healthcare to eliminate bias of the sample population with diverse and large as possible sample sets of doctors and citizens from each background. Plus, I will invest proper time while constructing the structured interviews and questionnaires, which can be then proofread by instructors from the ICO; these steps both ameliorate potential bias and error. Currently, Dr. Downing and I will be practicing these methods before I leave, and I will, to my best, forwardly acknowledge any probable bias or error within my results once collected and after written about. A maximally accurate response to all three research aims will be achieved with these measures. My preparation currently includes:  Pre-planning with Dr. Downing and discussion with Carmen Garcia-Downing, an Oaxacan American who is an indigenous specialist within the University of Arizona’s faculty at Mel and Enid Zuckermann College of Public Health—both advisors have conducted research in Oaxaca.  Interviewed Dr. Elsa Cruz, a Zapotec Indian medical doctor who just completed her social service in the Alta Mixteca of Oaxaca.  Through Dr. Cruz, made initial contact with the Universidad Autónoma Benito Juárez de Oaxaca medical school.  Emailed the ICO to begin registration for the language, room and board programs.
  4. 4. WEEK S  Through Dr. Cruz, confirmed two doctors whom anticipate working with me.  Registered for the Responsible Conduct of Research Workshop Series to be held on April 23rd .  Second semester Spanish proficiency.  Created research progression timeline (below). [0,1]=settle in, familiarize location, networking [4,5]=data from public, nonprofessionals [1,2]=language work, inquire on topic at ICO [5,6]= data from private public samples [2,4]=begin writing surveys, check translations [6,7]=data from traditional healers [2,4]=scheduling interviews, etc. for next month [7,8]=closing and writing week Diagram Notes: I will be in contact via email with Dr. Downing and Carmen-Garcia Downing throughout the project. At least twice I will meet in person with Carmen-Garcia Downing, while in Oaxaca. The total time spent in Oaxaca will be two months either beginning May 20th or June 20th (dependent on MCAT testing schedules), so ending either July 20th or August 20th . This opportunity will immensely enrich my entire life. Primarily, I will become more worldly and aware of the connections between culture and individuals. In context of practicing medicine, my sensitivity to patient culture and value will be fine-tuned. My Spanish language capabilities will strengthen and improve, which means the Spanish to English language barrier will not preclude my provision of care to any Latino community. Also, experiencing research involving qualitative techniques prepares me for medical school and other graduate level coarse work because of the emphasis on specific and effective writing. The likelihood that others will gain exists too. It is possible that other caretakers or students can glean new insights with presentation or the final findings. This project seeks to provide understanding of cultural healthcare differences, while academically preserving an accurate internal perspective on traditional and westernized medicine in Oaxaca, Mexico. Thank you, Richard Alan Russell ________________________ 1. Higgins, Cheleen Mahar. 1975. "Integrative Aspects of Folk and Western Medicine Among the Urban Poor of Oaxaca". Anthropological Quarterly. 48, no. 1: 31-37. 2. Giovannini, Peter, and Michael Heinrich. 2009. "Xki Yoma' (Our Medicine) and Xki Tienda (Patent Medicine)--Interface between Traditional and Modern Medicine Among the Mazatecs of Oaxaca, Mexico". Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 121, no. 3: 383. 3. Leedy, Paul. Practical Research Planning and Design. New York: Macmillan, 1993. Acclimation/Preparation/Observation Fieldwork/Writing 1 32 4 5 6 7 8

×