ADDRESSING
DEMENTIA: TOWARDS A
NEW INNOVATION
MODEL
Mark Pearson, Deputy Director, ELS
Dirk Pilat, Deputy Director, STI

5...
Main messages
• Dementia, affecting a growing number of
people globally, is untreatable today
• The human and economic cos...
THE ‘CHALLENGE’
Rising burden
• 5.5% of people aged over 60 had dementia across all
OECD countries in 2009

• Some evidence of stable or d...
Broken innovation model
• Late trails that
failed
• Little transfer
of biomedical
innovation to
point of care
• Risks and
...
Escalating R&D Cost
Costs of bringing a
successful drug to
market estimated
between
USD 1.3 – 1.7B

2013
Inappropriate caring model

•
•
•

Inappropriate use of drugs for behavioural and psychotic symptoms of dementia
Little in...
First ever G8 Summit on dementia
mobilised international commitment
THE ‘OECD RESPONSE’
Healthy Ageing and Dementia
- Key Factors

Source: adapted, OECD/HUGO Workshop on “Integrating Omics and Policy for Grand ...
Delivering better health and care
• Key goal of dementia strategies in many OECD countries
(France, the U.K., Germany, Aus...
Encouraging coordinated policies
Governance & Regulation

Research & Innovation

Collaborative Research & Business Models
...
Improving the environment for
innovation

Stronger Public Private
Partnerships

Open Science for greater
International Col...
Harnessing the Potential of Big Data

Kaiser Permanente
Electronic health records
stores 9 million patients 30 petabytes(*...
For further information
Online:
www.oecd.org/health
www.oecd.org/sti/biotechnology
www.oecd.org/sti/nano
OECD brochure on ...
Addressing Dementia - Parliamentary Days 2014
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Addressing Dementia - Parliamentary Days 2014

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Dementia is a devastating condition for the people affected, their family and friends, and for health systems. About 5.5% of people aged over 60 had dementia across all OECD countries in 2009, but prevalence rates soar to nearly one every two people aged 90 years and older. This is not a challenge for OECD countries alone. An estimated 58% of the 36 million people living with dementia in 2010 worldwide are from middle and lower-income countries. There is no known cure for dementia, nor effective therapies to slow down its progression. Efforts to develop reliable diagnostic techniques and effective treatments have exposed weaknesses in the way that health systems, researchers and companies interact. There is a need to change the way public and private stakeholders collaborate at national and global levels to address this issue. Furthermore, health and long-term care systems struggle to offer the coordinated response – in terms of information systems, quality protocols and workers’ skills -- needed to deliver high-quality services to this vulnerable population group. Addressing the challenges posed by dementia has now become a major endeavour at international level. A landmark G8 meeting on dementia, held in London in December 2013 concluded with a call for countries to accelerate research and its transformation in innovative care and health services, strengthening big and linked data systems for improving the prevention and treatment of dementia, and reforming health and social care systems to improve quality of life for people with dementia. By Mark Pearson, Deputy Director, Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs, and Dirk Pilat, Deputy Director, Directorate for Science, Technology and Industry, OECD.

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Addressing Dementia - Parliamentary Days 2014

  1. 1. ADDRESSING DEMENTIA: TOWARDS A NEW INNOVATION MODEL Mark Pearson, Deputy Director, ELS Dirk Pilat, Deputy Director, STI 5 February 2014
  2. 2. Main messages • Dementia, affecting a growing number of people globally, is untreatable today • The human and economic costs of dementia are likely to escalate unless: – Health and care systems deliver more prevention, high-quality and integrated services – Better use is made of data to prevent and treat dementia – Incentives for innovation and regulation are improved
  3. 3. THE ‘CHALLENGE’
  4. 4. Rising burden • 5.5% of people aged over 60 had dementia across all OECD countries in 2009 • Some evidence of stable or declining age-specific prevalence rates, • But global numbers (36 million) are predicted to triple by 2050 without a cure • As common among older people in developing and emerging economies as it is in developed countries. • Large economic and social cost for families and friends (USD 604 billion globally); still a relatively small expenditure for health systems
  5. 5. Broken innovation model • Late trails that failed • Little transfer of biomedical innovation to point of care • Risks and rewards for innovators not aligned
  6. 6. Escalating R&D Cost Costs of bringing a successful drug to market estimated between USD 1.3 – 1.7B 2013
  7. 7. Inappropriate caring model • • • Inappropriate use of drugs for behavioural and psychotic symptoms of dementia Little investment in prevention and healthy lifestyles Too often dementia patients are hospitalised (45 days ALOS across the OECD)
  8. 8. First ever G8 Summit on dementia mobilised international commitment
  9. 9. THE ‘OECD RESPONSE’
  10. 10. Healthy Ageing and Dementia - Key Factors Source: adapted, OECD/HUGO Workshop on “Integrating Omics and Policy for Grand Challenges: Healthy Ageing”, 13 April 2013, Singapore, presentation from Richard Johnson (CEO, Global Helix LLC; National Academy of Sciences Board on Life Sciences; Advisory Council, Global Coalition on Ageing, BIAC). 11
  11. 11. Delivering better health and care • Key goal of dementia strategies in many OECD countries (France, the U.K., Germany, Australia) • Several initiatives, for example • Local initiatives on integration of health and social care (e.g., 14 integrated care pilots in the UK ) • Mobilisation of citizens (e.g., UK dementia friends, modelled upon Japan Dementia Friendly Fujinomiya). • Data linkages (clinical, records, institutional, biological, etc) to improve dementia care (e.g., Ontario) • BUT – Little scaling up and cross-country learning; – issues to address eg the balance between data protection and use
  12. 12. Encouraging coordinated policies Governance & Regulation Research & Innovation Collaborative Research & Business Models Uptake and Demand Factors 13
  13. 13. Improving the environment for innovation Stronger Public Private Partnerships Open Science for greater International Collaboration Modernising regulatory pathways Big Data
  14. 14. Harnessing the Potential of Big Data Kaiser Permanente Electronic health records stores 9 million patients 30 petabytes(*) with 2 petabytes added each year New discovery programs New models of care European Bioinformatics Institute is storing 20 petabytes of data * [1 petabyte = 1 million gigabytes] Multidisciplinary collaborations Crowd-sourcing
  15. 15. For further information Online: www.oecd.org/health www.oecd.org/sti/biotechnology www.oecd.org/sti/nano OECD brochure on dementia: http://www.oecd.org/sti/addressing-dementia-the-oecd-response.pdf Contact: health.contact@oecd.org – Mark.pearson@oecd.org sti.contact@oecd.org – Dirk.pilat@oecd.org

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