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Medical MEMS 2015 -- Conference Guide

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Our Medical MEMS and Sensors 2015 conference (http://bit.ly/MedMEMS2015Reg) will be held on April 29-30, 2015 in Santa Clara, California. Confirmed participants include individuals from companies such as Apple, Intel, Google, EVG, IHS, Kaiser Permanente, Samsung, Skyworks, KAIST, Sensirion, UBOTIC, Tystar, Exponent, Qualcomm, Octovis, X-FAB, UC Berkeley, ProjectVision, HealthWatch, University of Michigan, Gel-Pak, Rogue Valley Microdevices, UC Merced, Case Western Reserve University, VA, Advance Reproductions, Becton Dickinson, AKM, Robson Technologies, UCSF, Coto, Excelitas, Fresenius Medical Care, Maxim Integrated, UC Davis, TECNISCO, Lenovo, Silex Microsystems, and others. If you are interested in being a sponsor or exhibitor, please email us at events@memsjournal.com. Register today!

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Medical MEMS 2015 -- Conference Guide

  1. 1. www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com | Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. MEMS Journal Conference Guide presented by
  2. 2. 2 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Participating Companies and Organizations (to date)
  3. 3. 3 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Sponsorship Opportunities Sponsorship packages range from $2,500 to $10,000 and include: ● Preliminary attendee list with contact information (one week in advance of event) ● Final attendee list with contact information (two weeks after event) ● 10-minute company introduction speaking slot during conference ● 2-5 (depending on sponsorship level) conference and reception admissions, transferable to individuals outside of sponsor’s company or organization ● Printed conference program and presentation slides in electronic format ● Full exhibit package (click here for more details) ● Recognition as sponsor, company logo and description in printed conference program and on printed conference signage ● Recognition as sponsor, company logo and description on event website and in pre- event marketing materials; company name listed on all pre-event press releases and media alerts ● Marketing exposure through promotional campaign by MEMS Journal and other media partners of the event. Event promotions will reach 70,000 to 80,000 individuals in the medical, biotech, MEMS, sensors and semiconductor industry segments. For questions or to book your sponsorship package, please email us at events@memsjournal.com.
  4. 4. 4 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Medical wearables and value driven medical care: an overview of emerging business models Mark Blatt, MD Worldwide Medical Director Intel The business and reimbursement climate in the USA (and worldwide) is rapidly changing from volume driven fee-for-service to payment models that are driven by the value of the outcomes. This change is facilitated by the availability and deployment of medical wearable in large-scale healthcare applications. In order for such deployments to be successful they must fulfill certain business and technical requirements. They must address meaningful business use cases (e.g. patient safety, health and wellness, avoided readmissions, chronic disease management) that offer competitive advantages over more traditional care models. They must be easy to use, yet highly secure; solve personalized problems yet be highly scalable; be both easy to manage and cost effective. Does your wearable solution fit these criteria? How do you turn your components and systems into a viable business model? This talk will focus on how your medical wearable solution can be deployed, at scale, to help solve real world business problems in today's healthcare industry. Biography: Dr. Mark Blatt joined Intel in 2000 working in the New Business Group. He is currently Worldwide Medical Director, Enterprise Solution Sales, in the Sales and Marketing Group. He has a particular interest in integrated care delivery, mobile point of care, secure computing and the emergence of cloud computing services. Prior to joining Intel, Dr. Blatt was the managing partner of a five-provider group in family practice. He is a graduate of Albany Medical College (MD) and Yale University (MBA). Dr. Blatt currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Clinical Groupware Collaborative, and Bryan University. He is a member of the IEEE Medical Technology Policy Committee, the American Telemedicine Association, HIMSS, a lifetime member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, and a diplomat of the American Board of Family Practice (1982-2010).
  5. 5. 5 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers The future of wearables: from a fitness accessory to an essential clinical tool Uli Chettipally, MD, MPH Emergency Physician Kaiser Permanente According to IHS, the worldwide market for sensors in wearables will expand to 466 million units in 2019. Wearable devices themselves will increase to 135 million shipments, three times the current number. This rapid growth in the market is exciting. Even more exciting to watch is the transition of wearables from a health and fitness accessory into a clinically useful tool; a tool that will be able to predict, diagnose and monitor disease processes. This talk will discuss: (1) the hurdles that need to be crossed to take advantage of this market opportunity, (2) the market forces and healthcare environmental factors that help with this transition, (3) the suggested path in this transition into a more clinical health care market, (4) the changes in the regulatory framework that is occurring in anticipation of this growth, and (5) the potential of partnerships among various stakeholders to leverage diverse strengths. Biography: Dr. Uli Chettipally is an emergency physician, researcher and an innovator with 20+ years of experience in patient care, clinical research and technology innovation. He is the co- founder and CTO of CREST Network, a consortium of emergency physicians and researchers at Kaiser Permanente, a large integrated health care delivery system in Northern California. He is also the co-founder of the San Francisco Bay Area Chapter of Society of Physician Entrepreneurs (SoPE), a non-profit that brings information, innovation and inspiration to healthcare entrepreneurs. He is a thought leader, strategist and an advisor for several projects. He is spearheading several technological innovations involving mobile healthcare, clinical decision support, knowledge translation, big data and shared decision making tools that will take us into the next generation of advances in disease prevention, risk stratification and outcomes based intervention.
  6. 6. 6 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Bending technology: a surgeon's perspective on wearable devices Sanat Dixit, MD Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer Octovis The recent crop of wearable consumer devices has generated tremendous interest and spurred application development for a host of industries, including healthcare. For individual physicians, the enterprise level introduction of new technologies can be a mixed blessing. The allure of innovation is quickly mitigated by the constraints of unfamiliar hardware and archaic software, often leading to inefficiency, disengagement and frustration. Physicians, as critical stakeholders in the healthcare continuum, often have little input on technology development, integration and adoption, yet they end up being the primary end-users. This presentation will touch upon the perspectives of the end-user, explore models on how to more optimally approach wearable technology integration into the healthcare space, and offer specific use case scenarios designed to enhance both workflow and engagement. Biography: Dr. Sanat Dixit is a board certified neurosurgeon specializing in cerebrovascular surgery. He is a co-founder of Octovis, a Nashville based healthcare company developing integrated workflow solutions for healthcare that incorporate wearable devices in the care cycle. Dr. Dixit was born in Lucknow, India and moved to the US in 1973. He completed his undergraduate studies at Case Western Reserve University in Biology and English. He earned his Doctor of Medicine degree at SUNY Stony Brook and completed his neurosurgical training at Pennsylvania State University's M.S. Hershey Medical Center. Following this, Dr. Dixit completed a two-year fellowship in cerebrovascular and neuro-interventional surgery at the prestigious Semmes Murphey Clinic where he stayed on as faculty through 2006. In 2012, he earned a Master's in Business Administration from Vanderbilt University. An active clinician, he maintains a thriving practice in Nashville, Tennessee. He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and Diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgeons.
  7. 7. 7 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Wearable sensors and big data computing for mobile health: monitoring to interventions Emre Ertin, PhD Associate Professor Ohio State University Recent advances in wearable sensing and mobile computing have given researchers the ability to collect unprecedented amounts of data about everything from biology to behavior that can explain and improve people's health status. Day-to-day data from wearable sensors allows for better and more personalized decisions in regard to health care and management. Specifically, real-time monitoring can optimize care delivery via delivering just-in-time mobile health interventions. However, there still exist a multitude of challenges to implement mobile health systems. First, while wearable sensors provide a large, noisy, and complex data stream about the many facets of a patient's life and health, there is still a gaping need for a computational engine that can transform sensor data into sets of useful bio-markers readily interpretable by clinicians. Second, the lack of mathematical models of human health and behavior and its interactions with the environment makes the intervention design a challenging task. Third, wearable sensors have to be designed to blend into people's daily life routine while providing information on physiology and behavior. This talk will describe recent progress in wearable sensing and computing to address these challenges, including behavior inference from multi-mode physiological sensors, models of stress, illicit drug usage, smoking and design of wearable UWB sensors for contactless measurement of heart and lung motion and pulmonary edama. Biography: Emre Ertin is a research associate professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Ohio State University. From 1999 to 2002 he was with the Core Technology Group at Battelle Memorial Institute. At Ohio State he served as principal investigator on AFRL, ARL, DARPA, NRL, and NIH funded projects on novel sensor concepts with applications to radar sensing and mobile health.
  8. 8. 8 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Non-invasive wearable transdermal microsystems for continuous monitoring of bioanalytes Anand Gadre, PhD Director, Nanofabrication Research Facility University of California, Merced This talk will provide a review of breakthrough technologies focused on the non-invasive wearable microsystems for health monitoring applications. Such sensor systems have the potential to provide new sources of physiological information through interaction with a variety of body fluids, such as saliva, sweat and interstitial fluids (ISF). These body fluids have been used for non-invasive detection of inherited metabolic disease, organ failure, and drug efficacy. However, most of the activity in this field has focused on non-invasive glucose sensors in connection to efficient diabetes management. Of these, electrochemical sensors have gained a dominant role in clinical diagnostics owing to their high performance, portability and low cost. Therefore, this talk will focus on the recent developments in wearable electrochemical non- invasive micro/nanoscale sensors for diabetic monitoring. It is expected that such wearable non- invasive sensors will bring many exciting opportunities for continuously monitoring the human body across a broad range of bio-medical and fitness applications. Biography: Dr. Anand Gadre graduated with his BS and MS degrees in Applied Physics from the University of Mumbai. Anand completed his doctorate from the Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), India. In 2001, Anand joined University of Maryland as a Postdoctoral Fellow and later worked as Research Associate in the Nanoscience and Microtechnology Laboratory (GNuLab) at Georgetown University. In 2004, Anand joined the State University of New York at Albany as an Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience, and later was promoted as an Associate Professor with tenure. Anand earned his MBA degree from the University at Albany in 2009. In 2011 Anand joined as the Director of a Core Nanofabrication and Stem Cell Research Facility at the University of California, Merced, where he is currently pursuing his research in nanobiotechnology.
  9. 9. 9 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Wearables for Parkinson's disease: validating sensors and apps for targeted clinical applications Joseph Giuffrida, PhD President and Principal Investigator Great Lakes NeuroTechnologies Parkinson's disease impacts quality of life for millions of people globally. Symptoms include tremor, slowed movements, stiffness, freezing, and gait abnormalities. Therapies to control symptoms can cause side effects of wild, irregular movements. Measuring symptoms and side effects, which fluctuate daily, is critical for optimizing patient care and clinical trials. Fluctuating symptoms and mobility deficits associated with Parkinson's create a targeted market for wearable sensors and telemedicine. While motion sensors are now common in wearables and mobile devices, gross movement measures do not provide a direct measure of Parkinson's features, as each symptom has very distinct features. Important details in assessing Parkinson's lie in protocol design, positioning and sensitivity of sensors, and clinically validated algorithms. This ensures targeted Parkinson's symptoms can be differentiated from daily activities that may mask or mimic those symptoms. Finally, balancing the tradeoff of data sensitivity versus user compliance represents critical constraints for targeted medical applications. Biography: Dr. Joe Giuffrida received his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 2004. His background focuses on movement disorders with extensive experience in clinical research, new technology development, and commercialization of medical devices. He has successfully secured and executed over $15 million dollars in programs funded by the National Institutes of Health and authored many scholarly publications and scientific presentations. Dr. Giuffrida is currently president and principal investigator at Great Lakes NeuroTechnologies, leading the company's growth through research, engineering, sales and marketing, manufacturing, and administrative teams. He has led global product launches of several wireless medical devices including Kinesia technology to assess Parkinson's disease.
  10. 10. 10 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Soft electronics: strategy for future wearable devices Jae-Woong Jeong, PhD Assistant Professor University of Colorado, Boulder Conventional medical devices that interfaced with our body were rigid and bulky. Biological organs and systems, by contrast, are soft, elastic and curved. Recent research and development initiatives have established the materials and manufacturing foundations for a new class of soft electronics and optoelectronic devices that overcome this fundamental mismatch in mechanics and form. These technologies enable ergonomic, non-invasive integration of sensors and actuators, directly with human body, in ways that are impossible with conventional hard, planar device technologies. This talk will review recent advances in soft electronics and materials that can be applied for advanced healthcare in wearable forms. The talk will also introduce our research on "skin-like" epidermal devices that can be integrated with the skin in a way that yields intimate, conformal contact at the electronics-skin interface. Finally, potential applications of soft wearable electronics will be discussed. Biography: Jae-Woong Jeong received his BS degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 2005, and his MS and PhD degrees from Stanford University in 2008 and 2012, respectively, all in electrical engineering. From 2012 to 2014, he worked as a postdoctoral research associate in Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Jeong is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering at University of Colorado, Boulder. His research interests are in developing flexible/stretchable bio-integrated devices, MEMS technology, and photonic microsystems for various biomedical applications including advanced health monitoring, human-machine interfaces, and drug delivery.
  11. 11. 11 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Heartbeat analytics: wearable sensors and applications Joni Kettunen, PhD CEO Firstbeat Technologies Heartbeat sensing is one of the emerging trends in wearables. Heartbeat is a physiological measure and as such provides access to human physiology and health. What can we learn from such data? One of the much discussed pathways is heart rate variability, which can be used for measuring stress and recovery. Heartbeat data is also related to physical condition, fitness, effects of exercise, sleep quality and metabolic processes. Different types of heartbeat sensors differ in accuracy, but they also enable different types of use cases. We will discuss different sensor types, such as ECG and PPG. Heartbeat is a physiological signal and the nature of such data should be taken into account in product planning, testing and validation. Heartbeat data, as derived from a wearable device, is complex and its interpretation requires understanding of the underlying biological dynamics. We will discuss the potential of heartbeat analytics to produce meaningful and physiologically valid metrics for health, wellbeing and sports. Biography: Dr. Joni Kettunen is the co-founder and CEO of Firstbeat Technologies, a Finnish physiological analytics company. Kettunen received his PhD in 1999 from the University of Helsinki on heart rate variability based modeling of physiological stress. At Firstbeat, Kettunen leads a team of 40 physiologists, data scientists and software engineers specialized in physiological modeling. He has led Firstbeat into a leading heartbeat analytics company, working within preventive health care industry, with hundreds of elite sports teams, and having produced analytics for millions of consumer products.
  12. 12. 12 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Reliability standards and test methods for wearable medical devices John McNulty, PhD Principal Engineer Exponent The wearable medical electronics market is expanding rapidly due to the evolution and miniaturization of sensor technologies. Unfortunately, many qualification standards used in industry are either not medically-specific or fail to address new technologies and concerns. This presentation will address gaps in existing standards and relevant test methods for wearable medical devices in the following areas: biocompatibility/biostability in the context of skin irritation and key irritant materials besides nickel; dermal injury arising from single or multiple fault conditions that cause resistive heating; corrosion as typically evaluated for implanted devices but also subject to exposure to sweat and other liquids; adhesion of devices to skin as well as within multi-layer assemblies; and RF performance in the context of radiation emissions and immunity as well as "wireless coexistence" with other wearable or implantable medical devices. Biography: Dr. John McNulty is a Principal Engineer in Exponent's Materials and Corrosion Engineering practice, where he has worked since 2009. He chairs the iNEMI working group on reliability standards for implantable medical electronic devices, and is a participant in the working group focused on wearable/portable medical electronic devices. His areas of specialization include failure analysis of components and systems, reliability testing and analysis, and electronic/opto-electronic packaging and assembly. He received a PhD in Materials Engineering from UC Santa Barbara and a BS in Materials Science and Engineering from UC Berkeley. He is a licensed Professional Engineer and a Certified Reliability Engineer.
  13. 13. 13 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers MEMS technology: key innovation driver for wearable medical devices Mehran Mehregany, PhD Director, Case School of Engineering San Diego Case Western Reserve University Use of sensor-enabled wearable wireless health solutions to monitor the health condition of chronic disease patients is key to the quality of life of the patient and to reduction of cost of health care - by keeping the patient out of the hospital and emergency rooms. Chronic diseases account for 75%+ of the US health care expenditures. Monitoring for early intervention is key to avoiding long-term adverse outcomes for those at risk of developing chronic diseases. This presentation will elaborate on the important role that MEMS sensors play in enabling wearable, health monitoring solutions. Capturing data is the key to such solutions, which requires sensors of various modalities. MEMS sensors have the advantages of miniaturization, integration and batch fabrication - driving size, performance and cost advantages. Biography: Mehran Mehregany received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1990, when he joined Case Western Reserve University. Mehregany founded the Case School of Engineering San Diego in July 2007, and its Wireless Health and Wearable Computing programs in 2011 and 2014, respectively. He is the Director of Case School of Engineering San Diego and Goodrich Professor of Engineering Innovation. Mehregany has over 360 publications describing his work (including a recent textbook on wireless health), holds 20 U.S. patents, is the recipient of a number of awards/honors and has founded several technology startups. His research interests are sensors, micro/nano-electro-mechanical systems, silicon carbide technology and microsystems, wearables and wireless health.
  14. 14. 14 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers A review of wearable sensors and actuators used for rehabilitation Hyung-Soon Park, PhD Associate Professor Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) With improvements in medicine in the last few decades, people are living longer, but with multiple, often complex, health conditions. From an epidemiological standpoint, the cohort of "baby boomers" in the developed countries is now reaching an age at which they will begin to severely stress the health care system. There is now an urgent need for improving health care systems for our aging society. For those having physical impairments from neurological disease or musculoskeletal problems, rehabilitation is a cornerstone for restoring body functions for daily activities such as manual tasks and walking. Accurate and reliable assessment, as well as proper physical therapy, are key factors for successful rehabilitation. As another example, robotic devices equipped with wearable sensors and actuators have been developed for intelligent rehabilitation. Additionally, this talk will discuss specific solutions based on wearable sensors and actuators used for hand rehabilitation. Finally, the presentation will provide examples of how wearable sensors are applied for reliable assessment of spasticity which is essential for effective rehabilitation. Biography: Hyung-Soon Park received his PhD degree in mechanical engineering from KAIST (Daejeon, Korea) in 2004. From 2004 to 2009, he worked as a research associate and a research scientist with the Sensory Motor Performance Program at the Rehabilitation Institute in Chicago, Illinois. From 2009 to 2013, he was a staff scientist with Rehabilitation Medicine Department at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Park is now an Associate Professor at the Mechanical Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in Daejeon, Korea. His current research interest focuses mainly on application of robotics and control technology for effective neuro-rehabilitation, and the study of neuromuscular impairments post brain injuries.
  15. 15. 15 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Maintaining independence: can wearable technology help older people remain mobile and live independent lives? Brenda Reginatto Clinical Research Manager Insight Centre for Data Analytics University College Dublin How could older people live their lives independently for as long as possible without costly care? How could we ensure no older person would ever have a fall? How could we guarantee people maintain enough physical ability to continue doing the things they love when they are 80, 90 or 100 years old? The proportion of global population aged 60+ will double by 2050, while the number of people aged 80+ will almost quadruple. These demographic changes will cause a profound impact on the prevalence of chronic conditions and demand for long-term care. Ensuring older people can remain mobile and able to care for themselves for as long as possible is critical to families and welfare systems. Recent advances in wearable sensors, data analytics, machine learning and robotics can contribute to breakthroughs in increased mobility. Relevant challenges remain in terms of cost, product design and usability, and sustainable business models centered on self-care. Biography: Brenda Reginatto is the Clinical Research Manager at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics in University College Dublin. She researches the application of wearable computing and machine learning in improving mobility assessment for older people. Brenda also works as consultant and advisor to health technology start-ups. She has an MSc in Gerontology from King's College London and has worked extensively with falls prevention and long term care. Brenda is passionate about creating technology products to support independent living amongst older people. She can be found on Twitter at @b_reginatto.
  16. 16. 16 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Smart textile garments: the new frontier of continuous ECG monitoring Dov Rubin, PhD VP Marketing and Business Development HealthWatch Technologies Recent breakthroughs in textile technology now enable continuous monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. Just how is this achieved? Are all textile and wearables claiming to sense ECGs capable of diagnosing a heart attack? Our personal health should intuitively be monitored by personal smart devices, but is there a market demand for continuous monitoring? This talk will examine the current ECG marketplace, and discuss the technical challenges of sensing ECG signals from clothing as well as getting the signals to the physician in real-time when every second counts. The presentation will also cover the economics, lucrative market segments, business drivers, and competitive landscape to show that not all wearables are created equal. Attendees will also be able to view, in a live presentation, a wearable textile with heart-sensing electrodes. Biography: Dr. Dov Rubin is an expert in non-invasive medical technologies and is currently Senior Vice President of Marketing and Business Development at HealthWatch, a med-tech startup developing innovative textile, ECG-sensing garments for around-the-clock patient monitoring. Dr. Rubin developed the first transcutaneous oxygen sensor, as well as the first microprocessor based patient ventilator with Puritan Bennett. He was also co-founder of NDS (NASDAQ), the leading supplier of secure digital TV entertainment delivery to over 140 million viewers, which he started in 1988 along with News Corporation's Rupert Murdoch. NDS was earning $650 million in annual revenues and was acquired by Cisco for $4 billion. More recently, Dr. Rubin was President and CEO of Itamar Medical, a publicly traded company (listed on TASE), which developed state-of-the-art biomedical products involved in non-invasive, early detection of heart disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Dr. Rubin has a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Southern California and MSc from Case Western Reserve University.
  17. 17. 17 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers The latest trends, challenges and opportunities in wearable sleep monitoring technology Leslie Ruoff, RST, RPSGT Sleep Core Director VA Medical Center Sleep is essential for restoring our minds and bodies, but millions suffer from poor sleep due to their environment, unhealthy behaviors, or illness. Many of these people are unaware that these issues prevent them from obtaining restorative sleep. Clinical sleep studies are expensive and typically only produce a single night of data that is collected in an unfamiliar setting. New advances in sensor and wearable technology can track sleep in our home environments for extended periods of time and can also educate and motivate us to improve our patterns and behaviors that we may otherwise overlook. With an increasing number of devices on the market claiming to track and improve sleep, it is imperative to assess the accuracy of the information they provide. This talk will provide an overview of the current sleep devices and sensors, their limitations when compared to the traditional "gold standard" measures, and emerging opportunities. The talk will also introduce the science of sleep and what changes our bodies encounter in a typical night. Biography: Leslie Ruoff is the Sleep Core Director for the Stress and Health Research program, affiliated with the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the Northern California Institute for Research and Education. Leslie has over a decade of experience in sleep medicine and pharmaceutical research. In 2010, she was appointed to establish and lead an internal and centralized support system for Department of Defense and National Institutes of Health funded studies exploring the relationships between sleep, circadian rhythms, sleep deprivation and cognitive functioning in PTSD, insomnia, pain, and neurodegenerative diseases. Leslie actively consults and collaborates with numerous primary investigators across multiple institutions and disciplines to integrate biometric data collection into research protocols, including a recent study seeking to validate a consumer wearable device reporting sleep patterns.
  18. 18. 18 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Driving cost-effective obesity care delivery with wearable technologies Shingai Samudzi Founder and CEO ProjectVision The healthcare industry transition towards a consumer-oriented service experience greatly incentivizes providers to leverage wearable applications as a source for gathering data about consumers on a daily basis, rather than just during (infrequent) patient visits or after emergency events. For example, a marketplace full of available data ultimately allows care providers to move away from "one size fits all" approaches to obesity management, instead deploying clinical resources in direct response to emerging needs among the population of patients served within the health system. The most relevant wearables in the obesity management space are those that have developed best practices around integrating wearable devices into the daily health patterns of users in key age groups that have been the most resistant to adoption. These best practices not only help patients reduce mortality risk through sustained behavior change, but also help care providers improve understanding of the pathologies behind obesity. Biography: A decision science graduate from Carnegie Mellon University, Shingai has a passion for leveraging data and algorithms to support business and public policy decisions. Within healthcare, he has had formative experiences with medical informatics and health system architecture working first at Cerner Corporation and subsequently at Kaiser Permanente. At both, he has managed large, multi-facility implementations of EMR integrations and patient experience services (such as remote video interpreter services). Over this same period, he was introduced to concepts such as Human Centered Design that lead him to experiment with combining qualitative and quantitative research methods for healthcare product development projects. Shingai founded ProjectVision in the spring of 2014 to execute his vision of cost- effective healthcare that is responsive to both individual and population health needs.
  19. 19. 19 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Wearable sensors for greater visibility into dynamic phenotype David Shaywitz, MD, PhD Chief Medical Officer DNAnexus A key premise of precision medicine, and of the Precision Medicine Initiative, is that the integration of rich genomic and phenotypic information can improve care, inspire science, and drive the development of novel therapeutics. Wearable sensors, a foundational technology of digital health, can provide greater visibility into dynamic phenotype, and complement and dramatically extend the comparatively static and episodic information typically available from the electronic medical record. The increasingly granular assessment of real-world physiology is expected to enable refined patient segmentation, and help define the underlying molecular networks -- though this ambition remains largely unrealized. Examples of efforts to integrate clinically-relevant dynamic phenotype with molecular biology in areas such as metabolism and respiratory will be examined. The potential application of other types of sensors, such as those assessing interpersonal interactions and degree of connectivity, will also be reviewed. Potential limitations, as represented by the pulmonary artery catheter experience, will also be discussed. Biography: Dr. Shaywitz (Twitter: @dshaywitz) is chief medical officer of DNAnexus, a Bay Area company that provides a cloud-based enterprise platform for the management of genomic and other healthcare data. Dr. Shaywitz received his MD/PhD from Harvard and MIT, and trained in internal medicine and endocrinology at MGH. He gained subsequent experience in the Department of Experimental Medicine at Merck, the healthcare practice of the Boston Consulting Group, and at Theravance. Dr. Shaywitz is a co-founder of the MGH/MIT Center for Assessment Technology and Continuous Health (CATCH) program focused on integrating rich phenotypic assessment with genetic information to guide clinical care and inspire fundamental research.
  20. 20. 20 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Conference Speakers Mass adoption of wearable medical devices: the role of health insurance companies Omid Toloui, MPH Digital Health Strategist Digital health and wearable medical devices aimed at promoting wellness or managing chronic illnesses have become smaller, cheaper and more effective. However, their adoption in the traditional healthcare marketplace has not reached its inevitable tipping point. This presentation will explore the role that health insurance companies (i.e., payers), the largest purchasers of healthcare goods and services, will play in the mainstream adoption and rapid growth of wearable medical devices. While these devices show great promise and should be attractive to an industry aimed at managing risk, they also present unique challenges. We will examine recent advancements in the use of digital health devices by insurance companies and explore emerging reimbursement models. We will also reflect on other established markets and products to help predict the future, and identify factors that can lead to the wide-scale acceptance of wearable medical devices within the healthcare sector. Biography: Omid Toloui is focused on advancing the digital health revolution. He is passionate about finding solutions at the intersection of healthcare, technology and design that engage individuals in understanding and proactively managing their health. Currently, Omid is Senior Director of Product Management at Altegra Health where he is responsible for managing and marketing solutions that marry data analytics and technology to educate patients on their conditions, ensure timely care and improve health outcomes. Previously, Omid directed Sinaiko Healthcare Consulting's strategic analytics practice. As a management consultant, he specialized in projects spanning multiple disciplines requiring a thorough understanding of the healthcare marketplace, strategy and the challenges facing patients, providers, payers and investors. He earned his Master of Public Health degree in Health Services Management, Bachelor of Science degree in Psychobiology and Minor in Italian from UCLA, and is currently pursuing his second Master's degree at UCLA.
  21. 21. 21 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. Sponsorship Opportunities Sponsorship packages range from $2,500 to $10,000 and include: ● Preliminary attendee list with contact information (one week in advance of event) ● Final attendee list with contact information (two weeks after event) ● 10-minute company introduction speaking slot during conference ● 2-5 (depending on sponsorship level) conference and reception admissions, transferable to individuals outside of sponsor’s company or organization ● Printed conference program and presentation slides in electronic format ● Full exhibit package (click here for more details) ● Recognition as sponsor, company logo and description in printed conference program and on printed conference signage ● Recognition as sponsor, company logo and description on event website and in pre- event marketing materials; company name listed on all pre-event press releases and media alerts ● Marketing exposure through promotional campaign by MEMS Journal and other media partners of the event. Event promotions will reach 70,000 to 80,000 individuals in the medical, biotech, MEMS, sensors and semiconductor industry segments. For questions or to book your sponsorship package, please email us at events@memsjournal.com.
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  25. 25. 25 www.memsjournal.com | events@memsjournal.com Copyright 2015 MEMS Journal, Inc. | All rights reserved. | Proprietary and confidential. About MEMS Journal, Inc. • MEMS Journal was founded in 2003 • 35 full-time and part-time staff and are headquartered in Southfield, Michigan • Largest MEMS publication worldwide, with 34,800+ subscribers, growing quickly • Published over 9,800 stories, interviews, and articles and have reviewed more than 26,000 patents and patent applications • Services include: –Strategic planning (focus and positioning, marketplace perception, competitive analysis, roadmap development) –Market research and intelligence (technology scouting and assessment, system and component teardowns, patent/IP analysis) –Event organization and management (organize 4-5 events and sponsor 20-25 events per year) –Marketing and advertising (brand building, lead generation) –Content development (whitepapers, presentations, reports)
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