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Storytelling by Design (scenarios talk at Confab 2011)

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It can be hard to build relationships with users when you think first about the message you want to convey or the transaction you want to enable, because a great relationship isn't about the story you want to tell--it's about the story your users want to experience. Kim Goodwin will show you how storytelling can help your team resist an analytical, me-first mindset by getting inside users' heads.

Storytelling by Design (scenarios talk at Confab 2011)

  1. 1. Storytelling By Design Kim Goodwin - @kimgoodwinDesigning With Scenarios © 2010 Kim Goodwin t: @kimgoodwin e: kimgoodwin@me.com 1
  2. 2. Who am I?Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  3. 3. HUH? I’M NO CONTENT EXPERT!Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  4. 4. We have some shared challenges!Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  5. 5. And divergent ideas about who users are...Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  6. 6. You willserviceus...Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  7. 7. Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  8. 8. “Before you make a movie, you have to have a script, and before you have a script, you have to have a story.”  - Arthur C. ClarkeStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 8
  9. 9. Stories fit the sequential nature of interactionDesigning With Scenarios © 2010 Kim Goodwin 9
  10. 10. Stories are a natural creation toolStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  11. 11. Stories are a natural communication toolStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  12. 12. SCENARIO n. A plausible story about a persona using the future product or service in a specific situation.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 12
  13. 13. Scenarios have all the key story elements*1. Character2. Conflict3. Plot4. Resolution*Unlike use cases & agile user stories Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  14. 14. 1. Not roles — characters with skills, needs, goals Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  15. 15. Our characters are personas Derived from behavior patterns in field research Described as specific people Always few, but more than one Varied characters make our solution more flexibleStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  16. 16. Carla, a MINI driver Paid off her Honda Civic Saw “Italian Job” Loved MINI site Found rational reasons Played with car config Went to dealer Not in stock; grrr! Limited info on dealer sites frustratingStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 16
  17. 17. Carlaʼs goals Drive a car that’s “her” Feel smart & rational Get it now Be taken care of after she buysStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 17
  18. 18. 2. Conflict: Realistic situations to resolveStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  19. 19. The cat sat on the mat.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  20. 20. The cat sat on the mat. dog’ s ^ Inspired by a quote from John le CarreStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  21. 21. Example for air travel: Andrea Pro photographer Carries on expensive gear Delays & small planes likely Cost or schedule is primaryStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 20
  22. 22. Andreaʼs goals Arrive with gear intact Be comfortable & entertained Anticipate issues with space, security, etc.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 21
  23. 23. Stories weʼd tell for Andrea Time-critical trip Cost-critical trip Something goes wrongStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 22
  24. 24. 3. Plot: the (ideal) future sequence of eventsStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  25. 25. We donʼt just make this stuff upStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  26. 26. Character : Trish Busy working mom Cooks for 1 - 3 people Shops for a week at a time Follows recipes to the letter Dinner must take < 30 minutes Nutrition-conscious Budget-conscious Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 25
  27. 27. Trish has these goals: Keep her family healthy Cook without thinking about it Save time Stick to her budget Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 26
  28. 28. Conflict: Cook something for the kid *now* Trish left work too late to go to the grocery store. Her daughter Carla is whiny because she’s hungry. Trish wants to end that quickly.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 27
  29. 29. Plot: What she says, what she gets back There’s not much in the fridge aside from some asparagus, cheese, sliced chicken, and a leftover leek.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 28
  30. 30. Trish picks these ingredients from what SousChef thinks she has. The SousChef already knows Carla is going through a vegetarian phase, so it automatically filters out recipes with meat in them.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 29
  31. 31. Trish tells SousChef she wants something quick; she sees a soup that will take 15 minutes. The recipe defaults to quantities for 3 people.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 30
  32. 32. It says to cook the leeks in butter for 5 minutes. She adds them to the pot & starts the timer on that step. SousChef chimes 5 minutes later.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 31
  33. 33. She adds the asparagus, water, and herbs, starts the next timer, then sets the table.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 32
  34. 34. “Storytelling reveals meaning without committing the error of defining it.”  - Hannah ArendtStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 33
  35. 35. The key to moving thingsalong: consensusStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 34
  36. 36. Early scenarios are optimistic!Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  37. 37. Pretend it’s magic How would it work without technology constraints? Pretend it’s human What would a helpful human assistant do for the persona?Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 36
  38. 38. Co-creation is helpful She doesn’t care about details; she just wants to see Really? That doesn’t results as quickly as possible. seem consistent with...Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 37
  39. 39. 4. Resolution! (Spoiler: Personas always win) Photo: Marian Wood KolischStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  40. 40. Everyone thinks the soup turned out great! Carla even goes back for seconds. Trish tells SousChef she liked the recipe so it’s easy to find later. Sketches courtesy of Michael VoegeStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 39
  41. 41. Buh-bye, silos. Hello, seamless end-to-end experience.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  42. 42. Buh-bye, silos. Hello, seamless end-to-end experience.Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  43. 43. Where would Andrea’s travel story start? Where would it end?Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 41
  44. 44. Scenarios play well with other tools Develop scenarios first! Then you can: Carve them up into user stories Document variants in UML Write out a hundred variations as text use casesStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 42
  45. 45. So we have scenarios. What now?Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 43
  46. 46. Stories evolve as we progress Users, problems, objectivesStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 44
  47. 47. Stories evolve as we progress Users, Properties of problems, a desirable objectives solutionStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 44
  48. 48. Stories evolve as we progress Users, Properties of Rough problems, a desirable concept & objectives solution scopeStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 44
  49. 49. Stories evolve as we progress Users, Properties of Rough Detail, problems, a desirable concept & evaluation, objectives solution scope iterationStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 44
  50. 50. Stories evolve as we progress Users, Properties of Rough Detail, problems, a desirable concept & evaluation, objectives solution scope iterationStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 44
  51. 51. Stories evolve as we progress Users, Properties of Rough Detail, problems, a desirable concept & evaluation, objectives solution scope iterationStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 44
  52. 52. Stories evolve as we progress Users, Properties of Rough Detail, problems, a desirable concept & evaluation, objectives solution scope iterationStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 44
  53. 53. Stories evolve as we progress Users, Properties of Rough Detail, problems, a desirable concept & evaluation, objectives solution scope iteration ^ after Slightly detailed designStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin starts 44
  54. 54. REQUIREMENTSX Statements describing desired system capabilities & qualities. Information, capabilities & solution qualities our users need.Designing With Scenarios © 2010 Kim Goodwin 45
  55. 55. Scenarios generate most requirements...Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 46
  56. 56. ...and persona goalshelp filter the restDesigning With Scenarios © 2010 Kim Goodwin 47
  57. 57. Then we identify solution components...Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  58. 58. ...and use scenarios to group them...Designing With Scenarios © 2010 Kim Goodwin 49
  59. 59. ...and do a first pass at layout Step 1 - tool B A C B Step 2 - tool A Step 3 - tool A C B CDesigning With Scenarios © 2010 Kim Goodwin 50
  60. 60. This gets us to storyboards...1 2 34 5 6Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 51
  61. 61. ...which we evolve with more scenarios...Storytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  62. 62. ...and “sell” with scenarios, tooStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin
  63. 63. So...let me sum up why scenarios rock Allow sequential thinking Capture the human side Help us think beyond features and silos Unlock the imaginationStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 54
  64. 64. “Those who tell the stories rule society.”  - PlatoStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin 55
  65. 65. Thanks! @kimgoodwinStorytelling By Design © 2011 Kim Goodwin

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