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Post Covid-19: A BBH briefing to marketing leaders

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Our first briefing on COVID was about how to keep trading as we headed into the crisis. In this briefing, we look at how to plan for the other side. In short, how to emerge well.

We cannot see into the future. Instead, we would always argue for a data-led position gilded with imaginative possibilities. While we outline how new spending attitudes and altered routes to market will affect the near-term, more broadly than that, this is a moment in time to make brands better for people. We should grasp that.

We cannot see into the future, but we can help invent it.

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Post Covid-19: A BBH briefing to marketing leaders

  1. 1. HOW TO EMERGE WELL - A BRIEFING BY BBH This mask is available from Shop Legend
  2. 2. Our first briefing on COVID was about how to keep trading as we headed into the crisis. In this briefing, we look at how to plan for the other side. In short, how to emerge well. We have gathered various data, models and hypotheses here to guide marketing discussions. Specifically, we ask how is everyone feeling? What can countries that have reopened teach us? What is the economic outlook? And how might brands respond? Ultimately, we cannot see into the future. Instead, we would always argue for a data-led position gilded with imaginative possibilities. While we outline how new spending attitudes and altered routes to market will affect the near-term, more broadly than that, this is a moment in time, an excuse, to make brands better for people. We should grasp that. We cannot predict the future, but we can help invent it. In the darkness, provide the light. EXEC SUMMARY
  3. 3. The situation at this time and what it means for brands. WHERE WE ARE NOW The 7 emotional phases of COVID-19, people’s behaviours and brand implications. EVERYONE’S EMOTIONS Some guidelines for brands in a post-COVID world. POST-COVID BRANDS Insight into different kinds of categories in a post-COVID-19 world. CATEGORY PROPOSITIONS
  4. 4. WHERE WE ARE NOW
  5. 5. One third of the world’s population have been in lockdown, creating severe economic implications. Different countries are at different stages of their curves. Those who are emerging are doing so slowly and cautiously so the critical ‘R’ number doesn’t tip back above 1, kickstarting reinfection rates again. Early consumer behaviour suggests two emerging segments: the ‘financially relieved’, who are enjoying being able to spend again, and the ‘value vigilant’, who are cautious of spending with such uncertainty ahead. Digital has seen years’ of adoption in months, flooded with first-time users. Brands need to adapt to the new dominance of this route to market. It’s here to stay. SUMMARY
  6. 6. As we approach June 2020, there have been nearly 6 million recorded cases of COVID-19 and 362,000 deaths, with 100,000 of those being in the US. Evidence exists the death count is higher. However, for many countries the daily number of deaths is reducing and governments are cautiously relaxing the protection measures and some businesses are re-opening. While the threat of a second wave exists and governments eyeball the crucial reproduction R number (as of 28th May the South Korean government may return to some restrictions to mitigate this), it can be said some optimism is returning. THE STATE OF COVID Source: McKinsey, 2020
  7. 7. THE CHINESE CANARY Wuhan was sealed off in late January and after 76 days of restrictive lockdown measures, the city ‘reopened’. Nearly 94% of business resumed operations by early May and people slowly started to congregate again. A level of cautious normality returned with the reopening of transportation, businesses, parks, and restaurants. Across China, hotel occupancy and domestic-flight capacity are slowly rising. In Wuhan, after a 35 day run of no new cases, 6 new ones were discovered and the city started testing all 11 million residents. It has since completed 6.5m tests. It is becoming clear exits will not be easy and quick, but gradual and cautious. Flattening the curve unfortunately lengthens the curve (e.g. Tony Blair Institute) and reopening risks the reproduction number (R) tipping above 1 again causing a second outbreak. Source: The New York Times, Tony Blair Institute
  8. 8. EUROPE’S EXIT Within Europe, some countries are activating gradual, coordinated transitions back to ‘normal’. Spain, one of the worst hit countries, has a 4-phase plan that has been branded as 'the transition to a new normality'. In best-case scenario the process will last eight weeks. Phase 0 - Preparation: children being let outside, individual outdoor sporting activities allowed, and shops reopening with arranged appointments and restaurants still delivering. Phase 1 - Initial steps: terraces open at 30% capacity, hotels open with common areas out of use, those over 65 are given a schedule to safely go outside, agriculture and fishing get underway, religious facilities reopen with restrictions, training for professional leagues is allowed. Phase 2 - Intermediate: indoor spaces in bars and restaurants open at 30% capacity; cinemas, museums and theatres open at 30% capacity, performances in open spaces are allowed with 400 people maximum capacity, and the academic year is bound to start in September. Phase 3 - Advanced: measures become more flexible, masks are still be recommended in public and particularly on transport, capacity of commercial areas is limited to 50% and a minimum two-metre distance is advised between people. Source: Marca
  9. 9. As cash flow slows, the knock on effects to all business and individuals is being felt. We can expect redundancies, lower consumer spending power, limited supply and demand in industries where congregation is required - all of which have grim knock-on effects. The World Economic Outlook from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) projects a sharp contraction of the global economy. It is estimated that the real GDP will decline by 3% in 2020 worldwide, with Europe and the United States most gravely affected. A partial rebound to 5.8% is expected in 2021, but only provided that economic activity normalizes and policy gives everyone a leg up. GLOBAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Source: International Monetary Fund
  10. 10. Emerging countries hold clues about how consumer behaviour might change in the coming months. First, in China there is some evidence of two spending extremes. On the one hand people are “revenge spending” as they enjoy more freedom again and the money they saved. On the other, 40% report being more financially cautious as uncertainty prevails (PwC). We are seeing a “value vigilant” segment growing, as it did post 2008, and the popularisation of the term ‘duansheli’ or financial savviness/discretionary thrifting trending on social. Second, e-Commerce continues to thrive. Alibaba, the biggest Chinese online commerce company, reports recent shopping activity near pre-COVID levels, even with the reduced consumer spending power and confidence. Overall, more than 50% of Chinese consumers show a significant move to digital, especially entertainment streaming, e-sports, restaurant and grocery delivery, online education, and online fitness (McKinsey). CHINESE CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
  11. 11. The US is more optimistic than European countries but less optimistic than India or China on recovery. In Europe, spending across all categories correlates with the easing of lockdown restrictions. A degree of confidence is returning. In Europe, UK respondents are most financially positive by significant margin (31%) compared to Spain (14%), Germany (16%) , France (18%) and Italy (6%). All that said, most people are not financially positive and report spending less versus the previous weeks. Austerity is returning. Routes to market appear to be permanently changed. Like China, in the United States, 75 percent of people using digital channels for the first time indicate that they will continue to use them post-crisis (McKinsey). WESTERN CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
  12. 12. In Europe, groceries and online entertainment are currently the only area people expect to spend more on in the coming weeks. Everything else, not so much (McKinsey). EUROPEAN CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
  13. 13. A similar pattern is seen globally - groceries, household goods, personal health and home entertainment are the only winners (McKinsey) GLOBAL CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
  14. 14. A handful of frontline, systemic brands or those setup to serve us in lockdown have been enjoying growth and may benefit from a newly acquired user base. Their job is retention. For everyone else, this is unlikely to be pretty. From a marketing standpoint, the greatest threat will be reduced demand as economic uncertainty swirls and keeps wallets in pockets. The second threat will be the the failure of brands to generate demand. We strongly remind readers of the lessons of history: during economic shocks brands that keep spending and do so in specific ways outperform their competition. Our first COVID-19 briefing contains the data. Also read Mark Ritson here. The early data suggests brands may need to now cater to two markets: the “financially relieved” and “value vigilant” and beef up their digital and direct offering which may be the primary route to market for some time. Overall, inertia will be brand poison. It is crucial brands plan ahead. The data tells us keying into people’s needs and emotions and building a bridge between your business and those with your brand is how to sell. So, what are those emotions? WHAT THIS MEANS FOR BRANDS
  15. 15. EVERYONE’S EMOTIONS
  16. 16. Lockdown is giving us a rare opportunity to understand people universally and speak to their key human needs and behaviours. In a strange way we are more united than ever. Because the staggered nature of curves we can see into the future a little. Understanding the universal emotional phases that run alongside the flattening of the curve will help your brand understand what your audience are likely to be feeling when. This should set the tone for your communications plan. In addition to the emotional similarities we include data on how different groups are feeling. SUMMARY
  17. 17. PEOPLE HAVE NEVER DISPLAYED SUCH HOMOGENEITY OF BEHAVIOUR IN RECENT HISTORY – OVER A BILLION PEOPLE STAYING PUT AT HOME, ALMOST UNIVERSAL USE OF FACE MASKS, DILIGENT WASHING OF HANDS AND WHATEVER ELSE DEEMED FIT TO AVOID THE DREADED VIRUS.” “ Ashok Sethi, WARC ”
  18. 18. Source: IPSOS China, El Comercio LESSONS FROM CHINA THE 7 EMOTIONAL PHASES OF FLATTENING THE CURVE Phase 6 Relief Phase 2 Panic Phase 1 Disbelief Phase 4 Habituation Phase 3 Adjustment Phase 5 Resistance Phase 7 Apprehension
  19. 19. PHASE 1 DISBELIEFA phase of skepticism, confusion, denial and overconfidence. People undermine the gravity of the Covid-19 crisis. 1. Jokes: memes, posts, etc. the internet underestimates the crisis. 2. Comparisons with the flu: to emphasize that Covid-19 is not a big deal 3. Social gatherings: International Women’s Day protests, friends getting together or crowded commuting is common and does not feel dangerous. 4. Normal routine: there’s little behavioural change in people’s everyday life.
  20. 20. 1. Food panic: empty shelves, queuing and hoarding (hand sanitizer, toilet paper, pasta, flour). 2. Safety measures: gloves and scarves as protection, hyper awareness of surroundings. 3. Less commuting: people stop going to work or avoiding closed spaces like the tube. 4. Last gatherings: rushing to do things one last time before quarantine. 5. News following: all eyes on the news; TV, press and on social media as main sources. PHASE 2 PANICAs Covid-19 gradually grows in the country, social distancing is encouraged. Fear and anxiety in people lead to pretty inexplicable behaviours.
  21. 21. PHASE 3 ADJUSTMENTLockdown is enforced and society slowly conforms to this reality. There’s a newly found sense of responsibility and solidarity, with people realizing what’s truly important in life. 1. Coping humour: jokes to mentally process the enormity of the change. 2. Keeping old habits: workouts, hypercommunication with friends, graduation, etc. 3. Making new habits: schedules, book groups, gym classes, political protests. 4. Sense of solidarity: increased sense of community and interest in society. 5. Reflection: introspection and reevaluation of priorities in life.
  22. 22. PHASE 4 HABITUATIONBoredom and laziness kicks in. People do anything to keep themselves busy and positive during the first weeks of lockdown. 1. Celebrating silver linings: good news or nice gestures in the world are appreciated. 2. Locking new habits: focus on the present day - ensuring it’s full of work, chores, binge-watching, bread making, etc. Routine becomes the main source of sanity. 3. Treat mentality: isolation life has little variety, so people create positive events to fill the experience void. 4. Escapism: fantasizing about life after coronavirus and refuging online to improve daily moods.
  23. 23. PHASE 5 RESISTANCEAs lockdown is extended, there’s big uncertainty on how long this will last. Frustration, irritation and weariness make an appearance. Rule breaking increases. 1. Inability to stick to a routine: productivity drops and initial high expectations aren’t always met. 2. Unstructured entertainment: constant binge-watching and gaming affecting daily schedules. 3. Financial concerns: paying bills with low income or none at all becomes a major issue. 4. Trouble sleeping: lack of movement is starting to take a toll, with people having trouble sleeping. 5. Expectation to return to normality: calculating when ‘back to normal’ might be happening.
  24. 24. PHASE 6 RELIEFAs the top of the curve has passes, new cases decline and the people slowly resume some normality, a weight is slowly lifted off of our shoulders, and people feel excited and hopeful. 1. Renewed strength: Feeling that they’re ‘over the hump’, people feel motivated to keep pushing. 2. Sense of satisfaction: Finally coming to the the end of a difficult period, celebration of endurance. 3. Spike in spending: Making plans, revenge buying, spending is bound to increase with good/new news. 4. Craving fun: people will feel like they deserve a good time, some sense of liberation.
  25. 25. PHASE 7 APPREHENSION 1. Reluctances of masses: the tube, lifts, planes and festival crowds seen as incubators. 2. Focus on individual safety: masks, hand sanitiser, whatever it takes to stay healthy. 3. Privacy concerns: criticism of government COVID-19 tracking plans, use of private data 4. Concerns over the economy and job security: financial caution, saving. 5. Readapting to old habits: going back to an old context will lead to a comeback of old habits. As relief subsides, people will have reservations - medical, societal and financial. As we adjust back to ‘normal life’, worry, doubt and ultimately fear around familiar things made unfamiliar is unavoidable.
  26. 26. May - July Relief Excitement, content and optimism March Panic Shock, anxiety, stress and fear February Disbelief Skepticism, confusion and sense of denial April Habituation Boredom, laziness and positivism March Adjustment Conformism, reluctance, and responsibility April - May Resistance Weariness, frustration and irritation May - July Apprehension Worry, caution, doubt and slight fear Mild warnings Elders at home Social distancing WFH advice Confinement No commuting Confinement Exercise hour Confinement Unknown end End of lockdown Gradual reopening Economic recovery No big gatherings Measures Jokes Flu comparisons Social gathering Normal routine Food panic Safety measures Less commuting Last gatherings News following Coping humour Keeping old habits New routines Solidarity Reflection Silver linings Locking routines Treat mentality Escapism No routine Entertainment Financial concerns Trouble sleeping Craving normality Renewed strength Satisfaction Spike in spending Craving fun Masses reluctance Individual safety Privacy concerns Job security issues Back to old habits Behaviours PRE-LOCKDOWN LOCKDOWN LIGHTER LOCKDOWN A SUMMARY OF THE 7 EMOTIONAL PHASES
  27. 27. PRE-LOCKDOWN LOCKDOWN LIGHTER LOCKDOWN IMPLICATIONS FOR BRANDS Relieve boredom Celebrate silver linings Pivot to positivity, away from solemnity Ignite optimism for the future Embrace emerging behaviours Stay dependable and stable Be ready for the spending spike Remind that you were there Pivot to value vigilant shoppers Celebrate new milestones Be cautious - this is not over Be agile and adaptable May - July Relief Excitement, content and optimism March Panic Shock, anxiety, stress and fear February Disbelief Skepticism, confusion and sense of denial April Habituation Boredom, laziness and positivism March Adjustment Conformism, reluctance, and responsibility April - May Resistance Weariness, frustration and irritation May - July Apprehension Worry, caution, doubt and slight fear
  28. 28. DESPITE THE SIMILARITIES THERE ARE ALSO SOME DIFFERENT TRIBES AS KANTAR HAS SHOWN Inspire Show inspiration, learning platforms and create opportunities Strategy Business as usual Alleviate boredom and open up new challenges and learning programs Messaging Chilled & compliant I am pretty chill. I hope I can see my mates again soon. Online apps Scrolling internet Media Challenge Close the gap, bring the outside world inside the house without breaking rules Normality in abnormality Products to indulge themselves, they are willing to pay extra for it Ostriches I don’t see what the fuss is about. I don’t care either. TV on demand TikTok Guide Be the friend that supports and give tips on how to reduce stress Assist and relieve Free up time to enjoy and remove burden or worries Precarious worriers This is tough, with kids, homeschooling, financially. Radio streaming Websites Support Support and guide them on how to keep healthy Inform and clarify Support materials to decrease their mental load and increase resilience Troubled & trusting I am really concerned about mine and my family’s health. Facebook Enable Enable to connect and communicate with family Familiarity and closeness Create stronger family connection, build on DIY and gardening Follow the rules A bit worried about not seeing others, but otherwise fine. Newspaper Instant messaging Connect Connecting via communication apps and sharing hobbies Keep active and connected Create communities that keep them mentally and physically fit Patiently waiting We’ll be fine. The main impact is not seeing others. Offline media Source: Kantar UK, Tribes Omnibus Wave 1-4
  29. 29. POST-COVID BRANDS
  30. 30. With a clearer view of the economic and emotional outlook, how might brands like to respond? This section offers more of a compass, less of a crystal ball, with a collection of diverse models, data and hypotheses that can spark discussion and guide decision making. The BBH position is that the voices proclaiming doom and that ‘everything has changed forever’ are overstating it. They are perhaps trying to sell you something. On the other hand, the voices claiming everything will return to normal are missing something. Maybe everything will in due course, but should it? This unique moment in time could be used to improve brands, to reimagine them and reform their roles in people’s lives for the better. We shouldn’t let the crisis go to waste. SUMMARY
  31. 31. THE THREE SCENARIOS WE CAN EXPECT A world we haven’t seen before A world that has been irreversibly changed and continues to be under influence by the condition of a pandemic. An old world with a few adjustments A world that has integrated some of the learnings of Covid-19 but that still yearns for old instincts and cravings. An old world where nothing has changed A world that has been on hold and is ready to press play again to continue exactly where it left off.
  32. 32. THE ‘NEW NORMAL’ IS JUST ANOTHER BULLSHIT LINE MARKETERS HAVE SWALLOWED “ Mark Ritson in Marketing Week issuing a warning against post-COVID sensationalism ”
  33. 33. FORBES’ MODEL Phase 3. Emerging Planning for a post-COVID world and its new dynamics Phase 4. Normalcy Operating and thriving in the new world order Time since first caseNumberofcases COVID-19 CASES We include some models of the future to help us navigate the next months. First is Forbes’. Soon most businesses will soon be approaching ‘Emerging’ or ‘Normalcy’ phases. Source: Forbes Phase 2. Withstanding Being resilient in a rapidly changing world Phase 1. Awaiting Bracing for the major impacts Healthcare system capacity
  34. 34. McKINSEY’S MODEL Next is McKinsey’s, which has some more detail. While their commentary is more sober, they point to more positivity in the broader change that can arise from this crisis. We share that optimism. Source: Forbes Phase 3. Return Returning to operational health Phase 4. Reimagination Reinventing companies around the new Time since first caseNumberofcases COVID-19 CASES Healthcare system capacity Phase 2. Resilience Absorbing the shock Phase 1. Resolve Crisis response Phase 5. Reform Deeper societal and commercial change
  35. 35. McKINSEY’S MODEL McKinsey go further suggesting what type of communications are relevant for the different exit stages. Source: McKinsey
  36. 36. HOW DO YOU WANT TO CHANGE?And McKinsey go further suggesting some options for brands heading towards the next normal Source: McKinsey
  37. 37. BRAND AND CONSUMER JOURNEYSBBH has built some journeys constructed from multiple data sources to help shed light on what to expect and do at different stages of COVID-19.
  38. 38. REFOCUS BUSINESS Pain point: Sudden decrease in revenue 1 and loss of customers 2 . Government shutdown of retail outlets 3 . Opportunity: Urgent minimise losses 4 by re-focussing business priorities and salvage resources 5 . SORT SUPPLY CHAIN Pain point: Sudden closure of key suppliers due to government restrictions 3 . Opportunity: Optimise processes to stabilise business 6 . REFOCUS SERVICES Pain point: Re-focus brand and marketing efforts to maintain relevance 7 and encourage business activity. Opportunity: Quick ways to revamp business to sell better, especially to a changing customer base and demand. Optimise online channels and eCommerce 13 . REIMAGINE PROPOSITION 12 Pain point: More than maintaining salience beyond Covid 8 Lack of certainty of growth 9 . Opportunity: Optimised processes 10 based on new behaviours and better use of data to drive growth 11 . 1 3 4 CRISIS MANAGEMENT TRANSFORMATIONOPTIMISATION 2 Sources: See next slide. FIRST, THE BRAND RECOVERY JOURNEY
  39. 39. SOURCES 1 - Sudden loss in revenue: The UK economy’s contraction in 2020 could be the worst since 1900. FT - The UK economic fallout from coronavirus in numbers (8th April 2020) UK business activity has dropped the lowest in 20 years. The IHS Market UK purchasing managers’ index (PMI), which accounts for 80% of the economy, crashed to 34.5 in March, down from 52.3 in February, marking the lowest reading since records began in 1996. Financial Times – 3rd April 2020 2 - Loss of customers: Consumer spend has fallen across: electricity, going out, non-essential purchases and staying in has become the new going out. FT - The UK economic fallout from coronavirus in numbers (8th April 2020) 3 - Shut down of non-essential retail outlets: UK lockdown happened on 23rd March (BBC) 4 - Urgent need to minimise losses: The UK Chancellor has announced a series of bailouts for full-time employees (Gov.uk) and self-employed professionals (BBC), as well as £90M to date for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) loans for small businesses (up to £5M – Farrer & Co) 5 - Salvage resources: Small businesses, especially those in the restaurant and hospitality sector such as Leon, have re-focussed the role of their stores to sell groceries as well as cooked food. Leon set up Feed Britain to sell 1kg cooked food batches, with profits going to their new charity Feed The NHS. Other restaurants have asked their waiters to become couriers to redistribute services without losing business. JustEat has launched a 3-day emergency delivery package to restaurants, with a commission rebate of 33%. 6 - Optimise processes to stabilise business: Hire a CRO (Chief Restructuring Officer - Deloitte), Use a diagnostic tool to determine the right level of Covid relief (PWC) across 6x key areas: Crisis management and response; Workforce; Operations and supply chain; Finance and liquidity; Tax and trade; Strategy and brand. 7 - Maintain relevance: Brands need to adapt the way they advertise to stay relevant and salient to customers during and beyond Covid. From a brand perspective, this involves being sensitive and empathetic (via donations, acting as a PSA, meaningful use of tech, realigning product operations - PR Week, rather than tone-deaf and lacking of substance. These include: shifting marketing efforts online, using video to maintain relevance to consumers, transparent delivery options, agile product creation and creative adaptation of platforms and services (WARC) 8 - Maintaining salience beyond Covid: Brands that have acted to help during Covid will come out winners, and those who have acted selfishly (not not helped at all) will be remembered by customers 75% of 35,000 consumers surveyed say brands should inform people of what they’re doing and 74% thinking companies should not exploit the situation. (Kantar, 2020) Brands praised for exemplar during Covid include brands that directly donate to Covid-related causes, making their services free for those in need, freezing subscriptions and making PPE (PR Week). 71% of 12,000 respondents said that if during this time “they perceive that a brand is putting profit over people, they will lose trust in that brand forever” and 77% said “they want brands only to speak about products in ways that show they are aware of the crisis and the impact on people’s lives.” (Edelman, via TIME) “Brands need to be transparent about their supply chain and product availability to build trust with consumers to avoid an unsatisfactory brand experience” (WARC) 9 - Lack of certainty for growth: While there are some logical/plausible predictions for how Covid will change certain industries (BCG, Forbes) for good, the future remains uncertain about when stabilization, or even long-term growth, will happen (see #12). 10 - Optimised processes: Including: Cash flow, Logistics (including sourcing), Operations, Marketing, Deliveries, Taxes (and exemptions), Budgeting and P&L. See also #6. 11 - Better use of data to drive growth: Currently QB is limited to individual SMB data which enables individual (or via accountant) management of P&L, however there is an opportunity to aggregate and anonymise data around sales/operations to show key trends and predict growth drivers, e.g. by area or sector. 12 - Stabilization: According to a Kantar survey, there is a general view that there will be a return to a “normal way of life” – half the population think this will happen in the next six months, a further quarter within the next year, and 19% “longer than a year” (Source: Kantar survey, UK fieldwork 19-21/3/20) 13 - eCommerce: “Consumers in 11 out of 12 markets said they were more frequently purchasing products online that they would normally buy in store due to COVID-19, according to one survey. Reasons range from government restrictions on retail or human movement to fear of potential health risks and reduced pleasure due to long queues and one-way systems in-store. As the pandemic eases, this sentiment is unlikely to reverse as quickly as it arrived. But then the limitations of letterbox and cupboard size dramatically impacted on physical shopping behaviours – leading to more being bought online and a return to fewer larger weekly physical shops.” (Source: WARC) “There is now a critical need for digital transformation. Brands are advised to leverage real time data to address demand spikes, upscale delivery capabilities and ensure strong content across eCommerce and search pages.” (WARC) and “Digital laggards will be substantially disadvantaged during the recovery.” (McKinsey)
  40. 40. UNCERTAINTY Pain point: Anxiety and fear 1 . Confusion about the real truth 2 . Unpredictability about the future 3 . Opportunity: Continuity and structure 4 . Being there for people when they need it most 5 . REALISATION Pain point: Stress from financial and emotional upheaval 6 . Depression 7 . Opportunity: Make people feel in control 8 . Demonstrate empathy 9 and consistency in service 10 . ADJUSTMENT Pain point: Boredom and loss of perspective 18 . Apathy towards non-essential purchases 13 . Loneliness and mental health issues 7 . Opportunity: Inspire and reignite joy, hope and resilience 19 . Rebuild confidence 20 . CLARITY Pain point: Uncertainty about when recovery will happen 21 . Fears about subsequent waves of crisis 22 . Opportunity: Lead the charge on normalization 23 . Help people find meaning and purpose again 24 . 1 3 5 CRISIS REACTION NEW NORMALACCLIMATISATION 2 Stages based on the 6 pandemic stages by Canvas8 Sources: See next slide SECOND, THE CUSTOMER RECOVERY JOURNEY Pain point: Drastic decrease in spending 11 . New lifestyle 12 , shopping behaviours 13 and workplace changes 14 . Social distancing 15 . Opportunity: Pivoting products and services 16 . Maintaining physical, mental and financial well being 17 . 4 INERTIA NEW NORMAL Pain point: Not wanting the old normal 25 . Fears of going out 26 . Slow recovery 27 . Opportunity: Smooth acclimatization 28 . New importance of health and wellbeing 29 . Boost brand strength, growth 30 and nurture lasting customer relationships 31 . 6
  41. 41. SOURCES Uncertainty: 1 - Anxiety and fear: Fear of coronavirus can cause mental and psychological disorders, which may lead to panic attacks, especially as symptoms of anxiety are similar to Covid-19 and can lead to panic attacks. (AA) 2 - Confusion about the real truth: The prevalence of Covid related fake news has never been greater, and social media giants such as Facebook and Whatsapp have taken measures to limit the spread of fake news. (Guardian) 3 - Uncertainty about future: “The current COVID-19 pandemic has heightened uncertainty over the economy, employment, finances, relationships, and of course, physical and mental health. Yet as human beings, we crave security. We want to feel safe and have a sense of control over our lives and well-being. Fear and uncertainty can leave you feeling stressed, anxious, and powerless over the direction of your life. It can drain you emotionally and trap you in a downward spiral of endless “what-ifs” and worst-case scenarios about what tomorrow may bring.” (Help Guide) 4 - Continuity and structure: Brands need to maintain presence and visibility. “Brands that have to ‘go dark’ should use other levers to maintain visibility, such as first-party data, customer experience and PR” (WARC) Brands that go dark beyond 6 months risk weakening key brand metrics such as popularity, affinity, leadership, difference and price. There is strong data from Millward Brown showing the correlation between ad spend and level of bonding with consumers (WARC). 78% of people say brands should help them in their daily lives during the crisis and just 8% say brands should stop advertising due to Coronavirus outbreak (Kantar, 2020) 45% of consumers want to see companies putting in place plans to protect the supply of services or products (Kantar, 2020) 5 - Being there for customers when they need it most: 75% of 35,000 consumers surveyed say brands should inform people of what they’re doing and 74% thinking companies should not exploit the situation. (Kantar, 2020) Brands praised for exemplar during Covid include brands that directly donate to Covid-related causes, making their services free for those in need, freezing subscriptions and making PPE (PR Week). 71% of 12,000 respondents said that if during this time “they perceive that a brand is putting profit over people, they will lose trust in that brand forever” and 77% said “they want brands only to speak about products in ways that show they are aware of the crisis and the impact on people’s lives.” (Edelman, via TIME) “Brands need to be transparent about their supply chain and product availability to build trust with consumers to avoid an unsatisfactory brand experience” (WARC) Realisation: 6 - Stress from financial and emotional upheaval: Since the start of Covid, there has been a rise in depression and anxiety: 67% report higher levels of stress, 57% say they have greater anxiety, 54% say they are emotionally exhausted, 53% say they feel sadness day to day, 42% report their overall mental health has declined. (Source: Qualtrix via Forbes). People losing jobs or getting furloughed. Job postings down by double digits for Linkedin and Indeed end of March (FT). Job vacancies down by ⅓ YOY and 70% lower than the week before Covid began (Institute For Employment Studies). Claims for Universal Credit skyrocketed by almost 1M (FT). More than ⅕ of employers plan to have redundancies over the next 3 months (FT). 7 - Depressed: Since the start of Covid, there has been a rise in depression and anxiety: 67% report higher levels of stress, 57% say they have greater anxiety, 54% say they are emotionally exhausted, 53% say they feel sadness day to day, 42% report their overall mental health has declined. (Source: Qualtrix via Forbes). 8 - Feeling in control: “Consumers need to view themselves as good decision-makers, as helping people see themselves as "doing the best they can" will foster loyalty.” Equally, reassuring people that they’re making smart, savvy decisions will instill a sense of confidence in their purchases. “Products and services that help create a sense of control will create a deeper emotional connection.” (Target Marketing) 9 - Empathy: Covid has been the ultimate test to see whether the brands we love can truly live up to their purpose, but this can often come with a hefty price tag. • “Brands Are Really Going To Be Judged [on how they behave during Covid].” (TIME) • “[For brands to] not even acknowledge [Covid] is a disconnect. It’s a missed opportunity to demonstrate that you’re listening and that you’re human, which is what we’re looking for from companies anyway.” (TIME) • “What happens when brand purpose is put to the test – and will customers forgive those brands that don’t meet the mark? Equally dangerous could be action that leaves brands looking uncaring [like Tesla and Virgin Atlantic]. [Brands] need to communicate effectively and be authentic. In the long term they will gain.” (Marketing Week). 10 - Consistency in service: 94% are highly likely to purchase repeatedly; if the customer feels bad, 79% are unlikely to buy again. (Target Marketing)
  42. 42. SOURCES Adjustment: 11 - Drastic decrease in spending: UK consumer spending drops 36.5% during Coronavirus outbreak (FT) – see also #13 New shopping behaviours below. 83% say they have delayed a purchase because of the outbreak. 41% say they plan to buy the delayed purchases when the outbreak is over in their country or globally. The most common delayed purchases are holidays (52%), clothing (32%), while 31% have delayed buying flights and a quarter delayed purchasing luxury goods. (WARC) 12 - New lifestyle: New lifestyle changes during Covid have been well documented, including lockdown restrictions (early ones include only going out once a day for essential shopping or exercise - see latest 5-level lockdown guidelines issued by the UK government on 20th May 2020), the emergence of virtual meetings (virtual weddings (BBC), virtual church services and socially distant blessings (CBS), virtual funerals (CNN), even virtual GP meetings (Mobile Health News) and sports training (see Joe Wicks - Metro). Increased consumption in media: 80% of people in the UK and US say they’re consuming more content than usual during the pandemic (Global Web Index, 2020), and there have been interesting new gaming behaviour and new ways to use virtual reality to create immersive experiences at home. 13 - New shopping behaviours: “Consumers in 11 out of 12 markets said they were more frequently purchasing products online that they would normally buy in store due to COVID-19, according to one survey. Reasons range from government restrictions on retail or human movement to fear of potential health risks and reduced pleasure due to long queues and one-way systems in-store. As the pandemic eases, this sentiment is unlikely to reverse as quickly as it arrived. But then the limitations of letterbox and cupboard size dramatically impacted on physical shopping behaviours – leading to more being bought online and a return to fewer larger weekly physical shops.” (Source: WARC) “There is now a critical need for digital transformation. Brands are advised to leverage real time data to address demand spikes, upscale delivery capabilities and ensure strong content across eCommerce and search pages.” (WARC) and “Digital laggards will be substantially disadvantaged during the recovery.” (McKinsey) Non-food sales plummeted by 36%, retail sales down by 19.1% YOY, the worst decline since that research began in 1995. Groceries sales up 6%. (KPMG and British Retail Consortium) “Brits have turned their focus online and looked to takeaways, digital subscriptions . . . to keep entertained and occupied.” – Esme Harwood, Director at Barclaycard. People are spending less and saving more. Nearly 9 in 10 adults surveyed have increased their saving, with more than 23% saving for a holiday. (FT) Facebook has just launched a new online shopping platform to take on the likes of Amazon and eBay (FT) and pledged $100M to small businesses in addition to providing advertising assistance for businesses marketing on the social network (Facebook). 14 - Workplace changes: Working from home has become the new norm, introducing a whole new set of behaviours including virtual meeting etiquette, new attitudes towards personal appearance when working from home (The Raconteur). If business workplaces have any chance of reopening in the long run, a number of key issues will need to be addressed for enclosed spaces, including changing air circulation systems to prevent infections (CDC) “We are witnessing what will surely be remembered as a historic deployment of remote work and digital access to services across every domain.” (McKinsey) 15 - Social distancing: "Social isolation can create a feeling of restriction and helplessness, therefore, people can get depressed” – Emre Tolun Arici, a psychiatrist, who teaches at the Istanbul-based Uskudar University (AA) 16 - Pivoting products and services: Many retailers with bricks and mortar outlets have redirected efforts to online sales with delivery partners, including LEON’s Feed Britain which donates proceeds to the NHS. Social media has also launched or released enhanced versions of online shopping platforms, such as Facebook’s new shopping platform to take on Amazon (FT), Shopify’s new shopping app (Tech Crunch). Internet traffic has increased by 90% (Virgin Media, 26th March 2020) and online shopping has also increased by 42% vs last month (Valassis, March 2020). Key to being able to sustain the rapid demand for online shopping is having plans in place for larger deliveries and weekly physical shopping trips, as there have been 17 - Maintaining physical, mental and financial wellbeing: Various mental health organizations such as MIND recommend a balance of physical and mental downtime activity, exercise, sleep, a healthy diet and digital detox where needed, as well as offline support (Independent, Help Guide) Inertia: 18 - Boredom and loss of perspective: Desire for control, escape and feeling good (Canvas 8) “As the world stares at exponential curves and wakes up to the sheer scale of COVID-19, it can be difficult to maintain perspective, or even know what the appropriate perspective is.” (WARC) During pandemic, people tend to lose track of time, due to a disruption in our usual established structure in our daily life and all the days are starting to feel the same because of increased monotonous routines - no commuting, working from home, increased screen time, decreased breaks (Huff Post) Apathy towards non-essential purchases: See #11 - Decrease In Spending and New Shopping Behaviours.
  43. 43. SOURCES Loneliness and mental health issues: Since the start of Covid, there has been a rise in depression and anxiety: 67% report higher levels of stress, 57% say they have greater anxiety, 54% say they are emotionally exhausted, 53% say they feel sadness day to day, 42% report their overall mental health has declined. (Source: Qualtrix via Forbes). Domestic abuse has also increased - Refuge report a 700% increase in calls (Observer) and in the UK death from domestic abuse since Covid has more than doubled (Guardian). 19 - Inspire and reignite joy, hope and resilience: Many experts recommend practising daily gratitude, mindfulness, regular routines, self care and taking it one day at a time and staying focussed on what we can control (Jay Shetty, Marie Kondo, BBC). Brands that help people will this will maintain relevance and salience throughout the pandemic and beyond. “There's evidence that positive moods can boost our immune system and can protect us from respiratory viruses, so it's not something to feel guilty about; it's a smart strategy just like washing our hands.” (Today) 20 - Rebuild confidence: Unemployment will be a factor that determines consumer behaviour and confidence beyond the pandemic. The IMF forecasts UK unemployment, currently at 4.8%, to fall to 4.4% in 2021. Whereas the Office of Budget Responsibility forecasts UK unemployment at 7%, peaking at 10% in Q2 2020, and falling to 5.5% by the end of 2021 (Mintel) Clarity: 21 - Uncertainty about when recovery will happen: Experts say a combination of uncertainty over when the shutdowns will end, a resulting loss of wealth, the speed and depth of the downturn, and the risk of a new outbreak without a vaccine are all factors weighing on people’s confidence about the economy bouncing back. Experts agree the pace of a recovery, likely in the second half of the year, is uncertain, because it depends on the extent of the damage in the first half such as the permanent loss of industrial capacity. They say current economic indicators point to an ongoing downturn. “A full recovery will likely hinge on developing effective therapeutic treatments for COVID-19, if not an effective vaccine,” said Setser. “Government support for the economy is also likely to be necessary for an extended period of time.” (IPSOS). 22 - Fears about subsequent waves of crisis: There have been cases of reinfections (Fortune), and antibodies are not known whether to last permanently or offer any protection from mutated strains of the Coronavirus (NPR). 23 - Lead the charge on normalisation: See Nike’s 4-step strategy to recovery post-Covid, which consist of: “containment”, “recovery”, “normalization” and “return to growth” (WARC) 24 - Find meaning and purpose again: “Brands have societal responsibilities: connecting people to vital services; informing during chaos and change; and entertaining when life is difficult.” (WARC) New Normal: 25 - Not wanting to go back to the old normal: Only 9% say they want life to return to how it was before the COVID-19 pandemic (YouGov, 2020) Almost 80% believe employee health should be a key priority for companies, while almost two-thirds believe flexible working should be a priority. (Kantar, 2020) 26 - Fears of going out: Despite restaurants reopening in Wuhan, people are still scared to go out and prefer to takeaway (Bloomberg) Use tried and true tactics to help consumers overcome their fears (The Drum) 27 - Slow recovery: Adjustment back to pre-Covid levels of consumption patterns and travel are likely to be uneven and slow. (McKinsey). Nearly three in four people in Spain (76%), and France (72%) are most negative about a quick recovery, followed by those in Italy (68%), the United Kingdom (67%), Russia and Japan (64%) (IPSOS). 28 - Smooth acclimatization: There is evidence that some behaviours created during Covid will become permanent after recovery. • 75% of people using digital channels for the first time indicate that they will continue to use them when things return to “normal” (McKinsey). • New customer journeys will need to be reimagined across all sectors to address safety and confidence. (McKinsey). • New financial and risk mitigation models will need to be defined. (McKinsey). • Brands will need to create new playbooks for managing future crises (WARC). • New permanent workplace measures include Twitter allowing their employees to work from home permanently (BBC) and New Zealand announcing a 4-day working week (Guardian). • New travel and commuting behaviours: the tube strikes in 2014 has resulted in 5% of people not commuting on the tube ever again (The Drum). Air fare will double due to spacing and lower capacity, and travel insurance is likely to increase (Money Expert). 29 - New emphasis on health and wellbeing: 8 out of 10 people would prefer the government to prioritise health and wellbeing over economic growth (GDP) during the coronavirus crisis, and six in 10 would still want the government to pursue health and wellbeing ahead of growth after the pandemic has subsided. (YouGov, via Guardian) 30 - Boost brand strength and growth: From the last recession in 2008-9, the stock price of companies with strong brands recovered nine times faster. (WARC) Brand strength correlates with resilience: ”Willing buyers demonstrate that they are willing to pay a premium for strongly branded companies, which are expected to have more reliable demand, lower cost profiles, more efficient marketing leverage, and lower cost of capital for longer into the future.” (WARC) 31 - Lasting customer relationships: Customer value (through metrics such as Customer Lifetime Value) is known to double that of brand value (brand and marketing assets) in the long run (HBR), so brands will need to double down on how they build long term relationships beyond comms and extend this across all parts of the customer journey and across all touch points.
  44. 44. WHAT DOES PETER FIELD SAY? Source: Peter Field/LinkedIn
  45. 45. HOW CONSUMERS MIGHT CHANGE FROM PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE PRIORITISING INDIVIDUAL SPENDING FREELY INTERNATIONAL LIFE BIG EXPERIENCES TO APPRECIATING NOW PRIORITISING COLLECTIVE CAUTIOUS & DELAYING EXPLORING LOCAL SMALL & MEANINGFUL EXPERIENCES
  46. 46. HOW BRANDS MIGHT CHANGE FROM BUSINESS + CSR BRAND EXTENSION RETAIL-LED TOUCHPOINTS WAY WE’VE ALWAYS DONE IT TO BUSINESS IS CSR BRAND CORE DIGITAL-LED TOUCHLESS EXPERIENCE THE WAY WE COULD DO IT
  47. 47. HOW BRANDS PIVOTED POST 2008 Doubling down on CX After rapid growth pre-2008, Starbucks saw a dramatic drop customer satisfaction. The solution was to shut all stores and retrain staff in customer experience to draw people out again. This galvanisation of the workforce supported +40% growth in valuation in the 3 years post 2008. Pivoting to value, framed in premium In 2009 Audi faced a perfect storm: a slowing economy, more frugal consumers and a greener society. Through better understanding its customers, Audi was able to evolve its communications, shifting its previously model-focused approach to one which highlighted the efficiency innovations of the entire Audi range wrapped in a premium tone. Creating an essentials sub brand The introduction of 1,200 disparate own label products under a new brand, named ‘Essential Waitrose’, the retailer ended 2009 as the UK’s fastest growing supermarket. Adding some joy The ‘Life's for sharing’ campaign gave people something they valued, to celebrate and share with their loved ones. Flashmob campaign was shared widely across television channels and online sites. The campaign generated £15m in incremental sales and payback of £1.46 per £1 spent. Joy broke through.
  48. 48. HOW BRANDS ADAPTED FROM PAST CRISES ACROSS CATEGORIES & DECADES 2008 Financial Crisis 9/11 Terrorist attack WWII Domino’s leaned into America’s culture of distrust to stage the most transparent “Pizza Turnaround” story. Hyundai launched the Assurance Programme to support people who were worried about job security. JetBlue offered All-You-Can-Jet passes for September-October 2009 to drive buzz and trial. General Motors reinvented its business and launched its “Keep America Rolling” campaign. Budweiser resisted the temptation to sell hard, and instead showed empathy and connected with America. Macy’s transformed its famous Thanksgiving Day Parade into a tribute to all first responders. Westinghouse Electric Corporation fueled a 10% rise in its female workforce. Piaggio innovated the way Italians got around on potholed roads, with the introduction of the Vespa. Chrysler halted car production to build tanks. But kept their share of voice consistent during wartime to remind consumers they were there.
  49. 49. WHAT NEEDS CAN YOU OWN POST COVID TO GIVE YOUR BRAND A CLEAR ROLE? Source: AdWeek, C. Jung “Brand Archetypes” PROVIDE STRUCTURE SEEK PARADISE LEAVE A MARK BUILD A CONNECTION Wisdom understanding, intelligence, truth seeking, clarity Freedom independence, bravery, nonconformity, self-sufficiency Liberation leadership, risk taking, progressive, bravery Power intuition, cleverness, charisma, highly evolved Mastery self-sacrifice, courage, redemption, strength Safety sense of wonder, purity, trust, honesty Innovation creativity, imagination, nonlinear, nonconformity Control power, confidence, dominion, high status Caregiver altruism, compassion, patience, empathy Belonging stewardship, altruism, respect, fairness Enjoyment humour, originality, irreverence, awareness Intimacy faithfulness, passion, sensuality, vitality
  50. 50. SPOT THE NEW OCCASIONS YOUR PRODUCTS AND SERVICES COULD LEAN INTO Morning. 6am-12pm Longer morning routines More personal care and self care products Alternative means of commuting Greater individual office space Afternoon. 12pm-6pm Financially savvy lunches More time outside during lunch hours Potential high street boom Using social for more - book clubs etc Evening. 6pm-12am Homecooking as therapy Home workouts to save on the gym Decrease in binge watching More adventurous experiences Safety while socialising Nightlife boom Rise in the after work night out Less hours sleeping, more hours doing Night. 12am-6am
  51. 51. REIMAGINE THE ROLE OF YOUR TOUCH POINTS This CX map shows the rapidly evolving role of key customer touch points based on COVID learnings. High res version here. Please refer also to the Brand Recovery Journey and Customer Recovery Journey in tandem with this for supporting insights.
  52. 52. TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE DIRECT TO CONSUMER BOOM We are expecting the ‘necessity' boom in ecommerce to remain, with concerns around in-store safety continuing until a vaccine is found. Retail shoppers and new-to-channel shoppers are likely to use brands that are most salient (WARC) so it is critical to maintain SOV and top of funnel traffic. New needs bring new implications for brands and their online experience. Maximize sales through digital channels Access to online (video) experts Expert staff profiles (e.g. Amazon power sellers) Content strategically placed through the experience Side by side product comparison No physical retail outlet Advice and support Staff that appreciate my needs Agile, optimised UX Clear choice Benefit focused product storytelling Virtual product experiences RTBs/ Reviews / Messages about delivery safety Lack of product knowledge Physical product experiences Reassurance NEW NEEDS IMPLICATIONS
  53. 53. REASSESS THE CLASSICS The channel that never dies. In an increasingly digital world, DM could represent the tactile experience your customers have missed. With more people spending more time at home than ever, cut through could be even sharper. DM scores high on trust, feeling valued and brand perception. You can also expect other media channel costs to increase more rapidly post COVID. Personal email from a corporate CEO? Did it land? There is more pressure than ever to drive value from existing customers in a time of crisis, and the attraction of high volumes are tempting. But, be careful as consumers are wary, don’t fall into the quantity trap, concentrate on building quality experiences that email drives into. Now is the time to reignite those customer insight tasks and adjust your strategy based on a new set of fragmented needs. Direct Mail Email
  54. 54. COVID-19 has sent a jolt through our lives. Our priorities have been reshuffled. Our deeply ingrained habits have been unlearnt, and we’ve formed new ones. Old contexts will bring old habits back. But during isolation, people have been forced to assess what actually adds value to their lives. When it’s over, they will have the chance to decide what they want to bring into the next chapter with them. These are some thought starters from BBHers. WHAT WE CAN PLAN FOR
  55. 55. GO CONTACTLESSStarbucks shut down 80 percent of its stores in China when COVID hit. It then debuted the “Contactless Starbucks Experience”. Similarly, car manufacturers in Asia have developed virtual showroom. Develop the new ‘beginning-to-end’ digital journey.
  56. 56. BE SELF AWAREHas your brand helped flatten the curve? Has it rewarded employees for their efforts during Covid-19? Know your starting point. Customers are keeping score.
  57. 57. LOOK AHEADOnce the massive milestone of ‘finish lockdown’ is ticked off, people will start to crave new challenges - new things to aspire to and work towards. Be the one to give them direction; get them excited about the future.
  58. 58. STAY GROUNDEDDon’t forget that things have changed, though. We’ll be more aware than ever of our mutual vulnerability. Expect a different sense of personal space and more caution. React accordingly. Remain reassuring. 70% UK oppose the opening of the economy before the virus is under control. 71% UK say they’d be nervous about leaving the house even if businesses were allowed to reopen. Ipsos Mori (UK)
  59. 59. FOCUS ON THE FAMILIARStick with what people know and love about you. In this equally disruptive adjustment period people will be looking to escape; they will seek out things that make them feel comfortable and safe in a climate of hyper instability.
  60. 60. CHAMPION THE LITTLE THINGSSimple pleasures are in. Going for a coffee with a friend, cycling into work or browsing the shops will feel like real treats, and offer the variety that people have been denied for so long.
  61. 61. RETHINK EXPERIENCEIn a reality where large gatherings aren’t an option, what is the new shape of experience? How do you make something feel big, exciting and tangible, without it physically being there?
  62. 62. Supermarket employees are key workers. NHS workers received the biggest round of applause ever (probably). There has been a shift in what people look up to and value. The people we look up to are everyday people who protect and serve. SPOT THE NEW ROLE MODELS
  63. 63. SUPPORT COMMUNITIESLocal is more powerful than ever. We’ve discovered a new found appreciation for those who around us and communities are now stronger. How do brands help support local, or provide intimacy in the same way that local does?
  64. 64. PREPARE FOR ANOTHER HITWhether it is a second wave of COVID-19 or a recession, be ready because it is coming.
  65. 65. PROVIDE THE LIGHTAs Kubrick once put it, “However vast the darkness, we must supply our own light”. Models, data and guesses aside, this is a unique moment in history to make brands better. We shouldn’t miss it.
  66. 66. A LOOK INTO CATEGORIES
  67. 67. We have analysed many different categories and collected the data, models and hypotheses for them into one place. In the interest of keeping this briefing short, please get in touch with ellie.ring@bbh.co.uk to set up meeting on your category. POST COVID CATEGORY CONTEXT
  68. 68. EXAMPLES OF CATEGORIES ANALYSED GAMING AND ENTERTAINMENT ENERGY PETCARE CONSUMER HEALTH FOOD DELIVERY CONFECTIONARY FASHION PERSONAL CARE LUXURY BEER TRAVEL EYEWEAR FMCGBEAUTY RETAIL
  69. 69. While optimism slowly returns and countries cautiously re-open, we can look at how the past dealt with previous economic shocks and look into the near future with countries that are further along the curve for guidance. The voices that claim systemic and fundamental change to life and marketing are probably overstating it. The voices that claim life will return to exactly how it was are probably missing the point. We would always argue for a data-led position but with imaginative possibilities. Seen this way, emerging well from COVID-19 will be about positioning for how people will spend differently and where they will buy. While there may be a more aggressive version of ‘value’ and ‘premium’ audiences, digital will become ever more crucial. But more broadly than that, it’s a moment in time, an excuse, to make brands better for people. We cannot predict the future, but we can help shape it. We believe we should make some lemonade from these lemons. SUMMARY
  70. 70. BBH is a global marketing agency with clients including Samsung, Nike, Tesco, Audi, Google, Absolut, American Express, Burger King and many more. This briefing is intended to share instructive examples and data to guide marketing discussions. For more specific strategic consulting on COVID-19 please get in touch with ellie.ring@bbh.co.uk www.bartleboglehegarty.com
  71. 71. A lot of curious and wonderful things and ideas have bubbled up because of COVID that we’ve been keeping track of. Here are some of our favourites. SECRET BONUS PACK
  72. 72. CORONA CLUBBING Production Club's concept for the personal protective equipment (PPE) suit, called Micrashell, is designed to offer people a way of safely gathering and partying at gigs and nightclubs during a pandemic. "After witnessing the events industry fall into an unprecedented recession, and seeing large groups of people ignore social distancing directives in order to go out and party, we felt obligated to address both issues and find a solution that benefited all,"
  73. 73. WILDLIFE IN VENICE CANALS Animals re-inhabiting human spaces
  74. 74. Many are turning to arts & crafts to pass the time, but some may be taking it too far... LINK
  75. 75. While the amount of PPE like masks, gloves, etc. has increased thanks to designers and brands pitching in to help, in the early stages of the pandemic many shoppers got creative when it came to protecting themselves while in-store. PARANOID APPAREL
  76. 76. ZOOM RAVES AKA CLUB QUARANTINE A natural progression for party goers… DJ sets have found their hottest new rave location on Zoom.
  77. 77. REINVENTING SPORT GAMES#Stayathome made people more creative, coming up with innovative ways to play their favourite games
  78. 78. TV SHOWS GO ON – FROM HOME Parks and Recreation (2009-2015) is holding a digital reunion, showing how the characters are coping with lockdown. Saturday Night Live is also continuing virtually, with cast members filming their sketches from home.
  79. 79. LIVE MOVIE WATCHALONGS – WITH THE STARSGoldenEye with Pierce Brosnan; Jurassic Park with the no-longer-a-kid star...
  80. 80. CELEBRATING MILESTONES VIRTUALLY Minecraft graduation Ceremony
  81. 81. TALENT SHOWS If you’ve heard the phrase “QUARANTINE. QUARANTINE. QUARANTINE.” in the past few weeks then you’ve seen a lot of dancing, seen a lot of milk being spilt and seen a lot of money donated. Entertainers (most notably Tory Lanez) are hosting talent shows on Instagram live to occupy the time. Those showing their talents are rewarded with Cash App donations being sent to them by viewers. Brands are getting involved too. PrettyLittleThing sponsored Tory Lanez’s Quarantine Radio with $20,000 to give away to a winner.
  82. 82. DATING HAS GONE VIRTUAL And so memes and dark Twitter humor of virtual dating are going viral.
  83. 83. SINGAPORE DEPLOYS ROBOT DOG TO ENCOURAGE SOCIAL DISTANCING Municipal authorities are using Boston Dynamics’ four-legged Spot robot to remind park visitors to keep a safe distance from one another. The robot is fitted with cameras that will be used to estimate the number of visitors to the park, but won’t collect personal data or use the video to identify individuals. Spot is remotely controlled, but it has built-in sensors to stop collisions and will be accompanied by a guide. If the trial is successful, NParks says the robot could be deployed full-time during peak hours in the park. Using the robot will reduce the need for staff to patrol the grounds, says NParks, and it “lowers the risk of exposure to the virus.” According to local newspaper The Straits Times, the board is also considering deploying the robot elsewhere in the city. Signs posted in the park ask visitors not to “disrupt” the robot on its patrols.
  84. 84. SOCIAL DISTANCING IN PARKS
  85. 85. IKEA LOCKDOWN FURNITURE Turn IKEA stuff you’ve got already into lockdown fantasy buildings. Perfect change of scenery for those who need an escape but can’t leave home (Dezeen).

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