Healing the Nurturersyoga based mindfulness programs   for female trauma survivors
The Growing Epidemic:                                                                                                     ...
The Growing Epidemic:                                                                 1                  The majority of  ...
women’s pathway to incarcerationWomen offenders differ significantly from their male counterparts*              Involvement...
women’s pathway to incarcerationWomen offenders differ significantly from their male counterparts*              Involvement...
women’s pathway to incarcerationWomen offenders differ significantly from their male counterparts*              Involvement...
women’s pathway to incarcerationWomen offenders differ significantly from their male counterparts*              Involvement...
understanding the         linkIncarceration   substance abuse   childhood trauma
understanding the      link      substance abuse   childhood trauma
roots in early life              childhood trauma
psychosocial experience  childhood trauma
childhood traumainterpersonal traumas
childhood trauma  interpersonal traumasadverse childhood experiences
adverse childhood experiences
adverse childhood experiences        sexual abuse
adverse childhood experiences        sexual abuse       physical abuse
adverse childhood experiences        sexual abuse       physical abuse      emotional abuse
e t r ab   adverse childhood experiences           sexual abuse        l          physical abuse     a         emotional a...
growing up in a household with:
growing up in a household with:  an alcoholic or drug user
growing up in a household with:  an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill
growing up in a household with:  an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill    ...chronically depressed
growing up in a household with:  an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill    ...chronically depressed     .....
growing up in a household with:  an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill    ...chronically depressed     .....
growing up in a household with:     an alcoholic or drug user     a member who is mentally ill       ...chronically depres...
n m  e            v ir o                                                growing up in a household with:         e n       ...
ACE and addiction      the more instances of aceVincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adver...
ACE and addiction      the more instances of ace                                                                          ...
ACE and addiction      the more instances of ace                                                      6 ace               ...
ACE and addiction      the more instances of ace                                                      6 ace               ...
ACE and addiction      the more instances of ace                                                      6 ace               ...
How does it happen?      Perceived or actual       threat to survivalJaak Panksepp, Brian Knutson, and Jeff Burgdorf. “The...
eri   ence                                                                                     b   er s Exp               ...
Update Software                           eri   ence              b   er s Exp      Re   memBrain
Update Software                           eri   ence              b   er s Exp      Re   memBrain
Update Software                           eri   ence              b   er s Exp      Re   memBrain
Update Software                                                                                                  eri   enc...
how does it happen?           Original stresser is           inescapable
many later stressers areescapable but we workon old programming
many stressors in adultlife are percieved.Children can be chiefamong them
Naparstek, Belleruth. Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal. Bantam, 2005.Rothschild, Babette. The Body ...
when changes in the brain occur...                                              even a stressor that is                   ...
The Mind/Body Connection           Neural responses create sensation in the body.         Sensations correlate to emotions...
The Mind/Body Connectionsystem responds
The Mind/Body Connection          sensation felt in body
The Mind/Body Connection                           emotions judged                             and resisted
The Mind/Body Connection    resistance of emotion creates more response/sensationRothschild, Babette. The Body Remembers: ...
closed system is createdNaparstek, Belleruth. Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal. Bantam, 2005.
Hyper Arousal                                                                                                          Dis...
Vincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kind...
Covington, Stephanie. “Women and the Criminal Justice System.” Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women’s Heal...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                                                      ...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                            Theory of addictionStephan...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                            Theory of addiction       ...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                            Theory of addiction       ...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                            Theory of addictionStephan...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                            Theory of addiction       ...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                            Theory of addiction       ...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                            Theory of addiction       ...
gender responsive model     integrates three theoretical approaches:                            Theory of addiction       ...
gender responsive model     women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to     healthy care of self in order to grow ...
gender responsive model     women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to     healthy care of self in order to grow ...
gender responsive model     women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to     healthy care of self in order to grow ...
gender responsive model     women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to     healthy care of self in order to grow ...
gender responsive model     women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to     healthy care of self in order to grow ...
gender responsive model                                   Mutual                                                          ...
gender responsive model                                     Theory of traumaHerman, Judith. Trauma and Recovery: The After...
gender responsive model                                     Theory of trauma        • history of abuse drastically increas...
gender responsive model                                     Theory of trauma        • history of abuse drastically increas...
gender responsive model                                     Theory of trauma        • history of abuse drastically increas...
gender responsive model                                     Theory of trauma        • history of abuse drastically increas...
gender responsive model                                     Theory of trauma        • history of abuse drastically increas...
gender responsive model                                     Theory of trauma        • history of abuse drastically increas...
gender responsive model                                             informed, mutual, safe and                            ...
Integrated Mindfulness Therapies                                        “an explicit emphasis on using                    ...
Trauma survivors do not  feel safe in, and loseconnection with the body
sensations are understood  as emotion and emotion   become the experience    FEAR   GUILT   SHAME   GRIEF  HOPELESS
sensations are understood  as emotion and emotion   become our experience    FEAR   GUILT   SHAME   GRIEF  HOPELESS
a profound feeling of   helplessness takes createsaction that is disproportionate        FEAR       GUILT       SHAME     ...
actions lead to judgment of  self and despair which    continues the cycle      FEAR     GUILT     SHAME     GRIEF    HOPE...
self compassion                             “...an important                  construct that moderates reactions          ...
four foundations of                                     Mindfulness                                                       ...
four foundations of                                     Mindfulness                                                       ...
four foundations of                                     Mindfulness                                                       ...
four foundations of                                     Mindfulness                                                       ...
four foundations of                                     Mindfulness                                                       ...
integrated mindfulness                               therapies                                                        allo...
NO SPACE
MORE SPACE
EVEN MORE SPACE
Perspective
Perspective Creativity
Perspective CreativityConfidence
Perspective CreativityConfidenceCompassion
Perspective  Creativity Confidence CompassionCommunication
1. Group Discussion2. Breathing for Space3. Asana and Guided Meditation
1. Group Discussion2. Breathing for Space3. Asana and Meditation
“After the first     session, I experienced myfirst pain free day in 20 years.” -JT
“I slept throughthe night for the first time sincebeing here.” -KD
“I called home  and my sister      told me   something Ididn’t like about my son and his    father. Thenormal reaction wou...
“My headachesare not as intense as they used to     be.” CS
“I use the breathwith my 3 ½ year       old son.“He wants to lose it. I say breathe. And he breathes     and calms       d...
“We talked about guilt and shame and how it feels  to experiencethose emotions in  our body. It isokay to go from 0      t...
“I wanted to reach across the  table and grabher by the throatbut I told myselfto breath and felt     my body    sensation...
“for so long I just   got used to  carrying these feelings around  with me, and  now I can feelthem softening.”
“You have  helped me   separate myself fromthe stress, and  have given    me the opportunity to create my own space.”
“When Im in     my room, I try to do the     breathingexercises when    Im feeling stressed and it   really helps  me. I a...
as women we can help each other        recognize and value our innate gifts            and abilities. by growing and      ...
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
Healing the Nurturers
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  • Healing the Nurturers

    1. 1. Healing the Nurturersyoga based mindfulness programs for female trauma survivors
    2. 2. The Growing Epidemic: Rise in Female Inmate Population 100,000 The number of 75,000 female inmates has soared by over 50,000 500% between 1980 25,000 and 2000* 13,420 90,688 0 1980 2000*Covington, Stephanie. “Women and the Criminal Justice System.” Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women’s Health 17, no. 4 (2007).
    3. 3. The Growing Epidemic: 1 The majority of female inmates are 0.9 mothers, substance abusers and report 0.8 a history of early childhood trauma 0.7 77%-90% 13,420 80% 75% and stress* 0.6 Early Childhood Trauma Substance Abuse Mothers*Amnesty International. “Women in Prison: A Fact Sheet”, n.d.
    4. 4. women’s pathway to incarcerationWomen offenders differ significantly from their male counterparts* Involvement in crime is usually economically motivated (driven by poverty/substance abuse) *Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    5. 5. women’s pathway to incarcerationWomen offenders differ significantly from their male counterparts* Involvement in crime is usually economically motivated (driven by poverty/substance abuse) More likely to share a history of physical and sexual abuse *Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    6. 6. women’s pathway to incarcerationWomen offenders differ significantly from their male counterparts* Involvement in crime is usually economically motivated (driven by poverty/substance abuse) More likely to share a history of physical and sexual abuse Less likely to be convicted of a violent offenses *Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    7. 7. women’s pathway to incarcerationWomen offenders differ significantly from their male counterparts* Involvement in crime is usually economically motivated (driven by poverty/substance abuse) More likely to share a history of physical and sexual abuse Less likely to be convicted of a violent offenses Face gender-specific adversities: sexual abuse, domestic violence, sexual assault and poverty *Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    8. 8. understanding the linkIncarceration substance abuse childhood trauma
    9. 9. understanding the link substance abuse childhood trauma
    10. 10. roots in early life childhood trauma
    11. 11. psychosocial experience childhood trauma
    12. 12. childhood traumainterpersonal traumas
    13. 13. childhood trauma interpersonal traumasadverse childhood experiences
    14. 14. adverse childhood experiences
    15. 15. adverse childhood experiences sexual abuse
    16. 16. adverse childhood experiences sexual abuse physical abuse
    17. 17. adverse childhood experiences sexual abuse physical abuse emotional abuse
    18. 18. e t r ab adverse childhood experiences sexual abuse l physical abuse a emotional abuse y
    19. 19. growing up in a household with:
    20. 20. growing up in a household with: an alcoholic or drug user
    21. 21. growing up in a household with: an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill
    22. 22. growing up in a household with: an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill ...chronically depressed
    23. 23. growing up in a household with: an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill ...chronically depressed ...or institutionalized
    24. 24. growing up in a household with: an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill ...chronically depressed ...or institutionalized violence toward the mother
    25. 25. growing up in a household with: an alcoholic or drug user a member who is mentally ill ...chronically depressed ...or institutionalized violence toward the motherboth biologic parents not being present
    26. 26. n m e v ir o growing up in a household with: e n l a an alcoholic or drug user n t a member who is mentally ill s ...chronically depressed tr e s ...or institutionalized is violence toward the mother d both biologic parents not being presentVincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie 52 (2003): 547–559.
    27. 27. ACE and addiction the more instances of aceVincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie 52 (2003): 547–559.
    28. 28. ACE and addiction the more instances of ace the higher the likelihood of addictionVincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie 52 (2003): 547–559.
    29. 29. ACE and addiction the more instances of ace 6 ace 250% increase of smoking the higher the likelihood of addictionVincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie 52 (2003): 547–559.
    30. 30. ACE and addiction the more instances of ace 6 ace 250% increase of smoking 4+ ace 500% increase of alcoholism the higher the likelihood of addictionVincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie 52 (2003): 547–559.
    31. 31. ACE and addiction the more instances of ace 6 ace 250% increase of smoking 4+ ace 500% increase of alcoholism 6+ ace 4600% increase IV drug use the higher the likelihood of addictionVincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie 52 (2003): 547–559.
    32. 32. How does it happen? Perceived or actual threat to survivalJaak Panksepp, Brian Knutson, and Jeff Burgdorf. “The Role of Brain Emotional Systems in Addictions: a Neuro-evolutionary Perspective and New ‘self-report’ Animal Model.” Society for the Study ofAddiction to Alcohol and Other Drugs, no. 97 (2002): 459–469.
    33. 33. eri ence b er s Exp Re mem BrainSteven F. Maier, PhD, Jose Amat, PhD, Michael V. Baratta, MA, Even Paul, BA, and Linda R. Watkins, PhD. “Behavioral Control, the Medial Prefrontal Cortex, and Resilience”, 2006.
    34. 34. Update Software eri ence b er s Exp Re memBrain
    35. 35. Update Software eri ence b er s Exp Re memBrain
    36. 36. Update Software eri ence b er s Exp Re memBrain
    37. 37. Update Software eri ence b er s Exp Re mem Brain New Neur al CircuitryLevine, Peter A., and Ann Frederick. Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma. Edited by Ann Frederick. First. North Atlantic Books, 1997.
    38. 38. how does it happen? Original stresser is inescapable
    39. 39. many later stressers areescapable but we workon old programming
    40. 40. many stressors in adultlife are percieved.Children can be chiefamong them
    41. 41. Naparstek, Belleruth. Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal. Bantam, 2005.Rothschild, Babette. The Body Remembers: The Psychophysiology of Trauma and Trauma Treatment. 1st ed. W. W. Norton & Company, 2000.Levine, Peter A., and Ann Frederick. Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma. Edited by Ann Frederick. First. North Atlantic Books, 1997.
    42. 42. when changes in the brain occur... even a stressor that is perceived or controllable will feel inescapable and life threatening*Steven F. Maier, PhD, Jose Amat, PhD, Michael V. Baratta, MA, Even Paul, BA, and Linda R. Watkins, PhD. “Behavioral Control, the Medial Prefrontal Cortex, and Resilience”, 2006.
    43. 43. The Mind/Body Connection Neural responses create sensation in the body. Sensations correlate to emotions that are judged as “negative” and resisted*Rothschild, Babette. The Body Remembers: The Psychophysiology of Trauma and Trauma Treatment. 1st ed. W. W. Norton & Company, 2000.
    44. 44. The Mind/Body Connectionsystem responds
    45. 45. The Mind/Body Connection sensation felt in body
    46. 46. The Mind/Body Connection emotions judged and resisted
    47. 47. The Mind/Body Connection resistance of emotion creates more response/sensationRothschild, Babette. The Body Remembers: The Psychophysiology of Trauma and Trauma Treatment. 1st ed. W. W. Norton & Company, 2000.Naparstek, Belleruth. Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal. Bantam, 2005.
    48. 48. closed system is createdNaparstek, Belleruth. Invisible Heroes: Survivors of Trauma and How They Heal. Bantam, 2005.
    49. 49. Hyper Arousal DissociationVincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie 52 (2003): 547–559.
    50. 50. Vincent J. Felitti, MD. “The Origins of Addiction: Evidence from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.” Praxis Der Kinderpsychologie Und Kinderpsychiatrie 52 (2003): 547–559.
    51. 51. Covington, Stephanie. “Women and the Criminal Justice System.” Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women’s Health 17, no. 4 (2007).
    52. 52. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: elements that very often coincide are addiction, lack of healthy relationships and trauma. Thus the need for gender responsive programmingStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    53. 53. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: Theory of addictionStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    54. 54. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: Theory of addiction theory of women’s psychological developmentStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    55. 55. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: Theory of addiction theory of women’s psychological development Theory of traumaStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    56. 56. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: Theory of addictionStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    57. 57. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: Theory of addiction • stigma (extreme social disapproval) is the main psychosocial difference between male/female addictsStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    58. 58. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: Theory of addiction • stigma (extreme social disapproval) is the main psychosocial difference between male/female addicts • fear of losing children lead women toward denialStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    59. 59. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: Theory of addiction • stigma (extreme social disapproval) is the main psychosocial difference between male/female addicts • fear of losing children lead women toward denial • addicted women have diminished sense of self worthStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    60. 60. gender responsive model integrates three theoretical approaches: Theory of addiction • stigma (extreme social disapproval) is the main psychosocial difference between male/female addicts • fear of losing children lead women toward denial • addicted women have diminished sense of self worth • chronic neglect of self over someone or something elseStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    61. 61. gender responsive model women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to healthy care of self in order to grow and recover theory of women’s psychological development Levine, Peter A. Healing Trauma. Sounds True, Incorporated, 2006.Miller, Jean Baker. Toward a New Psychology of Women. 2nd ed. Beacon Press, 1987.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    62. 62. gender responsive model women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to healthy care of self in order to grow and recover theory of women’s psychological development • connection is the guiding principle of growth for womenMiller, Jean Baker. Toward a New Psychology of Women. 2nd ed. Beacon Press, 1987.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    63. 63. gender responsive model women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to healthy care of self in order to grow and recover theory of women’s psychological development • connection is the guiding principle of growth for women • women develop a sense of self and self-worth when their actions arise from and lead back to connection with othersMiller, Jean Baker. Toward a New Psychology of Women. 2nd ed. Beacon Press, 1987.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    64. 64. gender responsive model women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to healthy care of self in order to grow and recover theory of women’s psychological development • connection is the guiding principle of growth for women • women develop a sense of self and self-worth when their actions arise from and lead back to connection with others • women’s psychological problems can be traced to disconnection or violations within relationships, families or society at largeMiller, Jean Baker. Toward a New Psychology of Women. 2nd ed. Beacon Press, 1987.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    65. 65. gender responsive model women need to shift from chronic neglect of self to healthy care of self in order to grow and recover theory of women’s psychological development • connection is the guiding principle of growth for women • women develop a sense of self and self-worth when their actions arise from and lead back to connection with others • women’s psychological problems can be traced to disconnection or violations within relationships, families or society at large • critical to women’s growth and recovery are environments where they can experience relationships that are:Miller, Jean Baker. Toward a New Psychology of Women. 2nd ed. Beacon Press, 1987.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    66. 66. gender responsive model Mutual empathetic each person in ability to join a relationship with another can reveal his at a cognitive or her feelings and affective and perceptions level without and be moved by losing the feelings and connection perceptions of with one’s own another. There experience is mutual influence and responsivenessMiller, Jean Baker. Toward a New Psychology of Women. 2nd ed. Beacon Press, 1987.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    67. 67. gender responsive model Theory of traumaHerman, Judith. Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence--from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror. 14tth printing. Basic Books, 1997.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    68. 68. gender responsive model Theory of trauma • history of abuse drastically increases the likelihood of health risk behaviors in womenHerman, Judith. Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence--from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror. 14tth printing. Basic Books, 1997.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    69. 69. gender responsive model Theory of trauma • history of abuse drastically increases the likelihood of health risk behaviors in women • both sexes are at risk of early abuse, but women are at greater risk for later in life interpersonal violenceHerman, Judith. Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence--from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror. 14tth printing. Basic Books, 1997.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    70. 70. gender responsive model Theory of trauma • history of abuse drastically increases the likelihood of health risk behaviors in women • both sexes are at risk of early abuse, but women are at greater risk for later in life interpersonal violence • first stage of trauma recovery is safety (in bodies and with other people)Herman, Judith. Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence--from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror. 14tth printing. Basic Books, 1997.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    71. 71. gender responsive model Theory of trauma • history of abuse drastically increases the likelihood of health risk behaviors in women • both sexes are at risk of early abuse, but women are at greater risk for later in life interpersonal violence • first stage of trauma recovery is safety (in bodies and with other people) • focuses on caring for oneself in the presentHerman, Judith. Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence--from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror. 14tth printing. Basic Books, 1997.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    72. 72. gender responsive model Theory of trauma • history of abuse drastically increases the likelihood of health risk behaviors in women • both sexes are at risk of early abuse, but women are at greater risk for later in life interpersonal violence • first stage of trauma recovery is safety (in bodies and with other people) • focuses on caring for oneself in the present • homogenous groups (including facilitator)Herman, Judith. Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence--from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror. 14tth printing. Basic Books, 1997.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    73. 73. gender responsive model Theory of trauma • history of abuse drastically increases the likelihood of health risk behaviors in women • both sexes are at risk of early abuse, but women are at greater risk for later in life interpersonal violence • first stage of trauma recovery is safety (in bodies and with other people) • focuses on caring for oneself in the present • homogenous groups (including facilitator) • supported, structured, consistent environmentHerman, Judith. Trauma and Recovery: The Aftermath of Violence--from Domestic Abuse to Political Terror. 14tth printing. Basic Books, 1997.Stephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    74. 74. gender responsive model informed, mutual, safe and empathetic relationships that foster shared growth, empowerment and compassion for self and othersStephanie S. Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. “Helping Women Recover: Creating Gender-Responsive Treatment.” The Handbook of Addiction Treatment for Women: Theory and Practice (2002).
    75. 75. Integrated Mindfulness Therapies “an explicit emphasis on using all of one’s inner and outer life as a laboratory to empirically explore which behaviors lead to suffering and which lead to happiness”Margaret Cullen. “Mindfulness-Based Interventions: An Emerging Phenomenon.” Springer Science+Business Media (2011).
    76. 76. Trauma survivors do not feel safe in, and loseconnection with the body
    77. 77. sensations are understood as emotion and emotion become the experience FEAR GUILT SHAME GRIEF HOPELESS
    78. 78. sensations are understood as emotion and emotion become our experience FEAR GUILT SHAME GRIEF HOPELESS
    79. 79. a profound feeling of helplessness takes createsaction that is disproportionate FEAR GUILT SHAME GRIEF HOPELESS
    80. 80. actions lead to judgment of self and despair which continues the cycle FEAR GUILT SHAME GRIEF HOPELESS
    81. 81. self compassion “...an important construct that moderates reactions to distressing situations involving failure, rejection, embarrassment, and other negative events. Self-compassion [is] associated with lower negative emotions in the face of real, remembered, and imagined events and with patterns of thoughts that generally facilitate people’s ability to cope with negative events.”Leary, Mark R., Eleanor B. Tate, Ashley Batts Allen, Claire E. Adams, and Jessica Hancock. “Self-Compassion and Reactions to Unpleasant Self-Relevant Events: The Implications ofTreating Oneself Kindly”, n.d.
    82. 82. four foundations of Mindfulness awareness of the bodyMargaret Cullen. “Mindfulness-Based Interventions: An Emerging Phenomenon.” Springer Science+Business Media (2011).
    83. 83. four foundations of Mindfulness awareness of the body awareness of feeling toneMargaret Cullen. “Mindfulness-Based Interventions: An Emerging Phenomenon.” Springer Science+Business Media (2011).
    84. 84. four foundations of Mindfulness awareness of the body awareness of feeling tone awareness of mental statesMargaret Cullen. “Mindfulness-Based Interventions: An Emerging Phenomenon.” Springer Science+Business Media (2011).
    85. 85. four foundations of Mindfulness awareness of the body awareness of feeling tone awareness of mental states awareness of mental contentsMargaret Cullen. “Mindfulness-Based Interventions: An Emerging Phenomenon.” Springer Science+Business Media (2011).
    86. 86. four foundations of Mindfulness awareness of the body awareness of feeling tone awareness of mental states awareness of mental contentsMargaret Cullen. “Mindfulness-Based Interventions: An Emerging Phenomenon.” Springer Science+Business Media (2011).
    87. 87. integrated mindfulness therapies allow for insights to arise from first hand experience. awareness - judgment + practice + awareness =Margaret Cullen. “Mindfulness-Based Interventions: An Emerging Phenomenon.” Springer Science+Business Media (2011).
    88. 88. NO SPACE
    89. 89. MORE SPACE
    90. 90. EVEN MORE SPACE
    91. 91. Perspective
    92. 92. Perspective Creativity
    93. 93. Perspective CreativityConfidence
    94. 94. Perspective CreativityConfidenceCompassion
    95. 95. Perspective Creativity Confidence CompassionCommunication
    96. 96. 1. Group Discussion2. Breathing for Space3. Asana and Guided Meditation
    97. 97. 1. Group Discussion2. Breathing for Space3. Asana and Meditation
    98. 98. “After the first session, I experienced myfirst pain free day in 20 years.” -JT
    99. 99. “I slept throughthe night for the first time sincebeing here.” -KD
    100. 100. “I called home and my sister told me something Ididn’t like about my son and his father. Thenormal reaction would be to go from 0 to 100. You know this yoga thing isworking. I’m justgoing to breathe. It prevents youfrom going from 0 to 100.” CS
    101. 101. “My headachesare not as intense as they used to be.” CS
    102. 102. “I use the breathwith my 3 ½ year old son.“He wants to lose it. I say breathe. And he breathes and calms down.”
    103. 103. “We talked about guilt and shame and how it feels to experiencethose emotions in our body. It isokay to go from 0 to 100. Recognizing it is important.”
    104. 104. “I wanted to reach across the table and grabher by the throatbut I told myselfto breath and felt my body sensations changing. I can not thank you enough for coming in hereand teaching me how to do this. Iknow I’m in here because I didn’t know how to calm myself before.”
    105. 105. “for so long I just got used to carrying these feelings around with me, and now I can feelthem softening.”
    106. 106. “You have helped me separate myself fromthe stress, and have given me the opportunity to create my own space.”
    107. 107. “When Im in my room, I try to do the breathingexercises when Im feeling stressed and it really helps me. I already spoke to another pregnant woman aboutjoining it later."
    108. 108. as women we can help each other recognize and value our innate gifts and abilities. by growing and recovering together we can create change in our society and effect the next generation.Claudia Liebl, Markus Panhuysen, Benno Putz, Dietrich Trumback, Wolfgang Wurst, Jan M. Deussing, Marianne B. Muller, and Mathias V. Schmidt. “Gene Expression Profi Ling Following MaternalDeprivation: Involvement of the Brain Renin-angiotensin System.” Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience 2 (2009).Jaak Panksepp, Brian Knutson, and Jeff Burgdorf. “The Role of Brain Emotional Systems in Addictions: a Neuro-evolutionary Perspective and New ‘self-report’ Animal Model.” Society for the Study ofAddiction to Alcohol and Other Drugs, no. 97 (2002): 459–469.

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