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13682996.ppt

  1. 1. PKSPL – S2 KEPELABUHANAN JAKARTA 5 MARET 2015 PRESENTED BY Capt. NASDION AGOES
  2. 2. PORT MANAGEMENT LEGAL BASE DASAR HUKUM: 1. Undang Undang no 17 th 2008 ttg Pelayaran 2. Peraturan Pemerintah no 61 thn 2009 ttg Kepelabuhanan 3. Permenhub no 51 ,th 2011 ttg Tersus dan Tuks 4. Permenhub no 52, th 2011 ttg Pengerukan dan Reklamasi 5. Permenhub no 53, th 2011 ttg Pemanduan 6. Permenhub no 36 , th 2012 ttg Organisasi dan Tata Kerja Kantor Kesyahbandaran dan Otoritas Pelabuhan 7. Permenhub no 414 th 2013 ttg Rencana Induk Pelabuhan Nasional 8. SK Dirjen Hub La ono : UM 002/38/18/DJPL-11 ttg Standard Kinerja Pelayanan Operasional Pelabuhan dll 2
  3. 3. Source : Lloyd’s Practical Shipping Guide’s, 2009. Port Operation’s, Planning and Logistics. Khalid Bichou 2/18 INTRODUCTION ON PORT SYSTEM
  4. 4. 9/18 Source : UNCTAD
  5. 5. PORT SYSTEM POLICY STRATEGY MANAGEMENT LOGISTICS OPERATIONS PLANNING Port follow the Trade Trade follow the port 3/18
  6. 6. PORT INSTITUTIONAL MODELS DESCRIPTION STRENGHTS WEAKNESSES Public service port • Own, develops and maintains, both infrastructure and superstructure • Own and operates handling equipment • Operate and performs on its own all service • Labour for allport service provides by public sector • Huge investment required • No redundancy (in theory) • Unity of command and management • Handling operations not compatible with administrative duties of public entity • Private sector out of the port business •Strong power from labour unions Landlord port •Owns, develops and maintains the infrastructure, but leases/rents it to the private sector •Handling services performed by private sector. Labour for handling service provided by private sector •Marine and nautical service may be performed by either the public sector, the private sector, or a combination of both • No investment required in equipment and superstructure facilities • Private sector efficiency and accountability •Investment by the private sector ensures strong market leadership, long-term relationship •Competitive market dynamics •Better management of port labour • Possibible conflict between private sector objectives and general public interest • Risk of footloose 10/18 Source : Port Operation Planning & Logistic, K. Bichou
  7. 7. PORT INSTITUTIONAL MODELS DESCRIPTION STRENGHTD WEAKNESSES Tool port • Own, develops and maintains, the infrastructure • Own superstructure which is operated by the private sector • Labour for handling service provides by public sector • Marine and nautical services may be performed by either the public sector, the private sector, or a combination of both • Huge investment required • No redundancy (in theory) • Double entity (public and private) undertaking handling operations and management • Possibility of conflict regarding equipment assignment and operational efficiency • No control over gang and labour efficiency from the part of the private sector Private service • Private sector owns, develops, and operates infrastructure, superstructure, and all other port service •Private sector provides labour for all port service •Regulatory and statutory fuctions may be performed by the public authority • Port operations and management performance not influenced by political decisions • Higher efficiency in asset and human resources management (in theory) • Prisk of market failure, eg monopolistic behaviour •Difficulty in planning and implementing public port policy • Possible deviation from core port business (eg handling) to more profitable activities (eg real estate development) 11/18 Source : Port Operation Planning & Logistic, K. Bichou
  8. 8. 8 Suprastructure  Belonging to the suprastructure are • sheds • terminal buildings • warehouses • tanks cranes vehicles hauling gear sheds storage areas Suprastructure equipment like: gantry cranes transtainers other cranes etc….
  9. 9. 9 Infrastructure  The main infrastructure facilities required  by ships and land carriers are • channels • aids to navigation • turning areas • locks • docks quay walls roads railway tracks water area inside the port territory quays land areas rail / road Infrastructure
  10. 10. PORT and TERMINAL MANAGEMENT Market & Service Port / Terminal Impact Operations Agent 4/18
  11. 11. MASTER PLAN OBJECTIVES • Cargo type bulk / container • Hinterland to cover • Type of ships to handle • Transport access Market Study • Optimalization plan • Areal of development and extention • Environment issue Development Plan • HRD • Bench marketing • SOP • Safety and Security • Maintenance • Marketing Management Plan 17/18 Source : Port Operation Planning & Logistic, K. Bichou
  12. 12. MARKETS AND SERVICES • Container, bulk, etc Port / terminal type • Quay, yard, gate, etc • Hinterland, foreland, etc Spatial Coverage • Service to ship • Service to cargo • Value added logistics Service Type • Trade lanes • Shipping service • Inland system • Logistics networks • Supply chain systems Network Type 6/18
  13. 13. PROCESS AND ELEMENTS OF STRATEGIC PORT PLANNING 13/18 Source : Port Operation Planning & Logistic, K. Bichou
  14. 14. CONCESSION ARRANGEMENT Under a BOT concession, the government provides an exclusive grant to the private sector to built and operate a port facility for a specified period of time. After the expire of this period, the grantor can lease out the facilities or, if the facilities have to be completely rehabilitated, he can grant a similar or different concessional arrangement. A BOT agreement implies that the concessionaire has rights similar to holding a title which allow him to use the port facility as a corollary to loans during the period of concession. BFOT (Build, Finance, Operate, Transfer), BTO (Build, Transfer, Operate) and WBTO (Wraparound BOT) are special variations of BOT concession used where the private sector is also in charge of project financing, where legislation forbids private ownership of public infrastructure, and where the private sector is in charge of expanding a public – owned port facility, respectively. Other variations include the Design, Build, Finance, Operate (DBFO). Both models provide a high degree of private sector control with little or no demand risk 15/18 Source : Port Operation Planning & Logistic, K. Bichou
  15. 15. CONCESSION ARRANGEMENT In the Build-Operate-Own (BOO) contract, the assumption is that there will be full and permanent privatization of the facilities built or operated at the end of the concession period of the concession agreement. The terms of a BOO concession should explicitly grant ownership of the facilities that will be built Under the build-Operate-Own-Transfer (BOOT) agreement, the ownership title over port assets and infrastructure conveys to the concessionaire during the concession. This arrangement facilitates to the Government at the end of the concession. This arrangement facilities the granting of loans by financial institutions to private terminal operators. However, subject to project economics, the concessionaire takes at least some demand risk in BOOT structure. Under the Equip – Operate – Transfer (EOT) scheme, port infrastructure already exists, but superstructure is supplied and operated by the private sector for an agreed period of time, after which it is transferred to the public sector 16/18 Source : Port Operation Planning & Logistic, K. Bichou
  16. 16. UNCTAD’S PORT GENERATIONS MODEL 2000+ 3rd generation port: dynamic mode in global supply chains Quality supply chains, competition on added value to the end customer 1970 - 2000 2nd generation port: gateway node in inter –modal transport networks Competition on location, port charges, efficiency, service level, reliability, VAS 1950 -1970 1st generation port: port as business Competition on cost and port charges 12/18
  17. 17. Type of Terminal
  18. 18. PORT INEFFCIENCY
  19. 19. KINERJA OPERASIONAL PELABUHAN  Standar Kinerja pelayanan operasional pelabuhan dan utilisasinya memperhatikan tingkat kualitas pelayanan kapal,pelayanan barang,utilisasi fasilitas, kesiapan peralatan pelabuhan, dan disesuaikan dengan karakteristik masing masing lokasi terminal di pelabuhan. (Pasal 7)  Standar Kinerja pelayanan operasinal pelabuhan tsb ditetapkan oleh SK Dirjen 21
  20. 20. KINERJA OPERASIONAL PELABUHAN  Operator Terminal menyampaikan laporan ke Otoritas Pelabuhan setiap bulan, dan akan diteruskan secara berkala ke Direktur Jendral, yg akan di evaluasi oleh Dirjen paling sedikit satu kali dalam periode enam bulan . ( Bab V. Ketentuan lain-lain)  Laporan dan evaluasi adalah sebagai dasar pengambilan keputusan untuk Perencanaan Pengembangan kebutuhan (Port Demand) pelabuhan di masa depan 22
  21. 21. TERIMA KASIH SELAMAT BEKERJA SELAMAT BERISTIRAHAT

Editor's Notes

  • 10.07.08
  • 10.07.08

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