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Best Practice: Urban Development Longevity Index (DLI)

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We want the DLI to be a practical tool that supports public managers in developing policies aimed at improving the quality of life of people aged 60 plus.

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Best Practice: Urban Development Longevity Index (DLI)

  1. 1. Best Practice The Urban Development Longevity Index (Índice de Desenvolvimento Urbano para Longevidade - IDL), Instituto de Longevidade Mongeral Aegon Brazil-based Instituto de Longevidade Mongeral Aegon in part- nership with Getúlio Vargas Foundation (FGV) developed the Urban Development Longevity Index (IDL). The Index looks at how 498 cities, large and small, across Brazil are preparing to meet the challenge of a growing 60-plus population. The IDL methodology comprises a set of 63 indicators divided into sev- en variables: health care, well-being, housing, finance, culture and engagement, education and work, and general indicators. IDL uses publicly available data from official government sources and other organizations, such as FGV, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), National Trade Service, and Brazilian Institute for Planning and Taxation. “More than a ranking, we want the IDL to be a practical tool that supports public managers in developing policies aimed at improving the quality of life of people aged 60 plus. We be- lieve this is particularly important today in light of increasing longevity rates in Brazil. The IDL presents, in a very objective way, the main points we need to address in order to improve people’s quality of life. It is important to note that when we promote quality of life for a given group, everyone benefits from it; for example the city becomes more competitive and attracts more investment”, says Henrique Noya, Executive Director of the Instituto de Longevidade Mongeral Aegon. Santos (in the State of São Paulo) tops the list of large cities by achieving a high score on the finance variable based on the low percentage of people living on a low-income. Santos also scored highly on the culture and engagement variable and is one of the five best large cities when it comes to well-being. Second place goes to Florianópolis, which also stands out in the finance variable, the “Island of Magic” is one of the cities with the highest income among senior citizens. The third place goes to Porto Alegre, leading the group when it comes to housing. São João da Boa Vista (State of São Paulo) leads the study among the small cities. It is one of the municipalities with the lowest number of deaths by firearm. In second place, Vinhe- do (State of São Paulo) is one of the cities with the highest income among seniors. Next, Lins (State of São Paulo) stands out when it comes to health care. “The central idea is for citizens to have the ability to objective- ly demand from their councilman and mayor, the improvement of specific indicators that are not going well in their city”, says Nilton Molina, President of the Instituto de Longevidade Mongeral Aegon and Chairman of Mongeral Aegon. More information about IDL and its methodology, as well as the actual city rankings can be found at (currently available in Portuguese only) http://idl.institutomongeralaegon.org
  2. 2. Contact information Headquarters Aegon N.V. Strategy & Sustainability Mike Mansfield Manager Retirement Studies Telephone: +31 70 344 82 64 Email: mike.mansfield@aegon.com aegon.com/thecenter Media relations Telephone: +31 70 344 83 44 Email: gcc@aegon.com Disclaimer This best practice is part of the report “Successful Retirement -Healthy Aging and Financial Security” The Aegon Retirement Readiness Survey 2017 report. It contains general information only and does not constitute a solicitation or offer. No rights can be derived from this document. Aegon, its partners and any of their affiliates or employees do not guarantee, warrant or represent the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in the case study.

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