INSIDE LACROSSE                   ROBBY BOYKPERIOD         10      MS.                       RIEGER
Thesis/PurposeTo research the historyof lacrosse, raise moneyfor an important cancerfoundation associatedwith lacrosse, an...
Personal RelevanceLacrosse is very important tome because I fell in love with itfrom the first time I saw a highschool lac...
Origins TheoryHaudenosaunee game of lacrosse     Mohawk     Oneida     Onondaga     Cayuga     Seneca     Tuscarora
Actual OriginsSoutheastThen spread to the North
Research of the SportSoutheastern Tribes - CherokeeGreat Lakes Tribes - Santee DakotaNortheastern Tribes - Iroquois
FactsIntense TrainingCheatingWar-like nature
More FactsOnly MalesNo HandsNamed by the French
ExpandingEast-Coast sport mainlyFastest growing sport
Rules of Boys Lacrosse10 on 10 including goaliesMust go for ballFace-offs
RulesOff sidesPenaltiesStick checks
Lacrosse Equipment
Offense
Defense
LONG POLE
Paul Rabil
ApplicationRaised money for the HEADstrong foundationShirtsLaces
HEADstrong FoundationNick CollelouriRidley High School                              Get HEADstrong Foundation shirts or sh...
Non-Hodgkin’sLymphomaGeneral NameLymphatic System
SHIRT SALESCHESTER COUNTY HOSPITAL
RELENTLESS    27
$1,290
The Fight14 monthsStill worked outregularlyNovember 28, 2006
Class ActivityWhat is one thing you would like to do beforeyou die and why?
Works Cited      Atonwah, Wi:se. “Lacrosse: Ancient Haudenosaunee Game.” Editorial. Peace 4 Turtle Island. Kanatiyosh, Dec...
(Continued)      McPhee, John. “PIONEER.” New Yorker 22 Mar. 2010: 34-37. Print. John McPhee wrote this to share a coach’s...
(Continued)     Freed, Stanley A. "Lacrosse yesterday and today."Cobblestone 15.9 (1994): 32. History Reference Center. EB...
Conclusion“Make use of the time you have and don’t stressthe little things. Have a smile and enjoy what you               ...
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  • image - http://umhsboyslacrosse.webs.com/\n
  • Image - http://www.headstrongfoundation.org/category/photos/\n
  • Image - http://images.townnews.com/timesherald.com/content/articles/2010/04/07/sports/doc4bbc142367e29426291723.jpg\n
  • Origins of lacrosse are said to have traced back to the Haudenosaunee Creation Story. The Creation Story goes like this. There was a fight for power to control the world between Sapling, a god who is the holder of the heavens, and Flint a god who is the Mischievous One. They played a variation of the current sport of lacrosse from sunrise to sunset. There ended up being no winner so they had to find other games to play. Sapling ended up winning and when he created humans he passed on the sport of lacrosse. This is why lacrosse is known as a sacred game. It is a way of connecting to the gods. Lacrosse was often played as a sort of medicine for the people because it was so sacred.\n\nSource - \nAtonwah, Wi:se. "Lacrosse: Ancient Haudenosaunee Game." Editorial. Peace 4 \n     Turtle Island. Kanatiyosh, Dec. 2001. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. \n     <http://www.peace4turtleisland.org/pages/lacrossewise.htm>. The main \n     point to why I am using this article is because it tells a tale about how \n     these two gods played a version of lacrosse in order to see who would be \n     the one to create humans. Teharonhiawakon won and became the \n     Great-Creator.Then after he created the people he passed down stories of \n     their origins and the game of lacrosse.\n\nImage - http://www.nativewiki.org/images/4/4b/Iroquois_6_Nations_map_c1720.png \n
  • The experts aren’t quite sure where it actually originated but they think it started in the southeastern part of our present day United States. It then worked it’s way up the Mississippi River into the Great Lakes area and along the way became more and more altered from the Southeastern game.\n\nSource - McCluney, Eugene B. "Lacrosse: The Combat of the Spirits." American Indian \n     Quarterly 1: 34-42. JSTOR. Web. 23 Dec. 2010. \n     <http://www.jstor.org>. This Journal entry was very well written \n     about how lacrosse was actually invented. It was started by the French and \n     the Native Americans. They had 2 foot long sticks with the top curved into \n     a loop and the net made out of deer thongs to stop the ball from passing \n     through. The name was termed by the French. The article goes into detail of \n     how the sport was made and and why it was started: for religious reasons. \n     It is perfect for my project because it explains in detail how lacrosse \n     used to be played.\n\nImage - http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://turtletrack.org/Issues04/Co08142004/Art/lacrosse.jpg&imgrefurl=http://turtletrack.org/Issues04/Co08142004/CO_08142004_Tribal_Gifts.htm&usg=__sVah9Et6P5ui-6pbKpG78zfmdR0=&h=269&w=365&sz=61&hl=en&start=0&sig2=5DfSGNX98loTSxHOmoz-Lg&zoom=1&tbnid=bFc3DXxx653NtM:&tbnh=151&tbnw=201&ei=eMTATdalG8eSgQfftOH4BQ&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dnative%2Bamerican%2Blacrosse%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive%26biw%3D1140%26bih%3D615%26gbv%3D2%26tbm%3Disch0%2C32&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=775&vpy=73&dur=378&hovh=180&hovw=244&tx=119&ty=124&page=1&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:3,s:0&biw=1140&bih=615\n
  • There are 3 different versions of lacrosse played. The southeastern tribes like the Cherokee played with 2 2 and a half long sticks to pick up a deerskin ball between them. The Great Lakes Tribes used just one 3 foot long stick with a pocket barely larger than the ball at 3 to 4 inches in diameter. It was also made of wood. The Northeastern Tribes like the Iroquois played with a stick longer than 3 feet and a pocket similar to present day lacrosse sticks. They were made of wood and were the foundation for the current day sport.\n\nImage - http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3174/2968471334_f782eed5b1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.flickr.com/photos/leonandloisphotos/2968471334/&usg=__JrCIHHCNg4CazS5pLEin_QMH8Ac=&h=357&w=500&sz=167&hl=en&start=0&sig2=kyYEp1fSbcetx5FJN3L-Gw&zoom=1&tbnid=5cDLLQTKMpoZvM:&tbnh=144&tbnw=191&ei=eMTATdalG8eSgQfftOH4BQ&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dnative%2Bamerican%2Blacrosse%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive%26biw%3D1140%26bih%3D615%26gbv%3D2%26tbm%3Disch&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=835&vpy=258&dur=159&hovh=190&hovw=266&tx=241&ty=119&page=1&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:9,s:0\n\nSource - http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3174/2968471334_f782eed5b1.jpg\nVennum, Thomas, Jr. "Native American History of Lacrosse." Editorial. \n     http://www.laxhistory.com/. LaxHistory, 2001. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. \n     <http://www.laxhistory.com/>\n
  • Athletes started training 2-3 weeks prior to the actual game. During this training, they avoided certain meats like Frog because the bones are easily broken. Those that ate it were going to get hurt in the beginning of the game because their bones would be brittle too. They took this game seriously and cheating was punishable by death. Along with the game being religious it was also training for war or self defense. Scar tissue would form on their arms from being hit so much but this only made them stronger.\n\nSource - McCluney, Eugene B. "Lacrosse: The Combat of the Spirits." American Indian \n     Quarterly 1: 34-42. JSTOR. Web. 23 Dec. 2010. \n     <http://www.jstor.org>. This Journal entry was very well written \n     about how lacrosse was actually invented. It was started by the French and \n     the Native Americans. They had 2 foot long sticks with the top curved into \n     a loop and the net made out of deer thongs to stop the ball from passing \n     through. The name was termed by the French. The article goes into detail of \n     how the sport was made and and why it was started: for religious reasons. \n     It is perfect for my project because it explains in detail how lacrosse \n     used to be played.\n\n\nImage - http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://thelacrosseguy-ide.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Native-american-lacrosse.jpg&imgrefurl=http://thelacrosseguy-ide.com/evolution-of-lacrosse/native-american-lacrosse/&usg=__43g1XPYwz6wAce4Cw4yXf0SXaO0=&h=433&w=592&sz=59&hl=en&start=0&sig2=SBv2ujZTAUF1zB2CxDlqjQ&zoom=1&tbnid=5xTjZzOjTo14XM:&tbnh=151&tbnw=202&ei=BpHATcbUA4XbrAGq7820Bg&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dnative%2Bamerican%2Blacrosse%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive%26biw%3D1140%26bih%3D615%26gbv%3D2%26tbm%3Disch&itbs=1&iact=rc&dur=734&page=1&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0&tx=142&ty=56\n
  • The original game was only played by males. It didn’t have many rules but the one main rule was do not touch the ball with your hands. The ball was to be picked up, thrown and caught with the crosse. La crosse was what the French called the game because it is a general name for a game being played with a curved stick and a ball. The Iroquois still play today but were just accepted into international play during the 1980s.\n\nSource - McCluney, Eugene B. "Lacrosse: The Combat of the Spirits." American Indian \n     Quarterly 1: 34-42. JSTOR. Web. 23 Dec. 2010. \n     <http://www.jstor.org>. This Journal entry was very well written \n     about how lacrosse was actually invented. It was started by the French and \n     the Native Americans. They had 2 foot long sticks with the top curved into \n     a loop and the net made out of deer thongs to stop the ball from passing \n     through. The name was termed by the French. The article goes into detail of \n     how the sport was made and and why it was started: for religious reasons. \n     It is perfect for my project because it explains in detail how lacrosse \n     used to be played.\n\n\nImage - \nhttp://iroquoisnationals.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=49&Itemid=55\n
  • Lacrosse was primarily an east-coast sport in the U.S. until not too long ago. Over the past 20 years it has spread like wildfire into states like Kentucky. Fathers who used to play lacrosse are the ones that are getting their kids to play and coaching them. Then other kids get their friends to try it and it’s all history from there. Mostly hockey players and football players were the ones trying out lacrosse in the early days of the sport and now that kids are given the opportunity while they are young to play, they are taking it. As you can see on the chart, the number of athletes playing has more than tripled over 18 years and that is just up to 2008. The numbers for this year are likely to be much much more higher.\n\nImage - http://www.lax4ct.com/graphnew.gif\n\nSource - \nMcPhee, John. "PIONEER." New Yorker 22 Mar. 2010: 34-37. Print. John McPhee \n     wrote this to share a coach's story about how he spread lacrosse. It is \n     relevant to my topic because it explains how lacrosse is spread around the \n     country and how it came to be what it is today. This article is about a \n     lacrosse coach named Bill Tierney who was a successful coach at Princeton \n     but got a call from the University of Denver about who they could find to \n     be their coach. They asked Tierney to coach for them and he decided that he \n     was definitely going to do it since there were only two big lacrosse \n     schools on that side of the Mississippi. He was going to show that lacrosse \n     is not just an Eastern United States game, but anyone in the U.S. can play \n     it and be successful. This pioneered lacrosse and spread it around the \n     country. It is safe to say that more people are playing lacrosse around the \n     country then ever before. It is a fast growing sport and that is what this \n     article is about.\n\n
  • The game of men’s lacrosse is a complicated sport but like all sports it’s easy once you get the hang of it. 10 people on each team are allowed on the field at one time, so 20 players in total: 3 attack men, 3 defensemen, 3 midfielders and 1 goalie. After goals are scored and at the beginning of each quarter, there is a face-off in which one midfielder from each team stands in the middle of the field while the other midfielders are on each side. The ball is placed between them and at the whistle they try to clamp the ball down, pick it up and run to the offense.\n\nImage - umhsboyslacrosse.webs.com\n
  • These are pictures of face offs. The referee yells: Down, Set, and then blows the whistle and the first one to get the ball after the whistle wins the face off. There are 2 midfielders on each other side of the face off to get the ball when it flies out. They must stay behind the line until the whistle blows. Once one team picks up the ball and runs with it a possession call is called by the ref and then he blows the whistle. Attack men and defense men must stay behind the restraining box line until the possession whistle is blown.\n\nImage 1 - http://www.ptboyslax.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/.pond/2010_lax_faceoff.JPG.w560h293.jpg\n\nImage 2 - http://www.adrenalinelacrosse.com/ssp_director/p.php?a=XF9VXiM%2FPSUqYHtlPzMtPTI6OjM5OyYyKzE5LTM%2BNzki\n\nImage 3 - http://sites.bellevuelacrosse.com/home/Home/news-1/bellevuehandleslynnwood18-1/small%20faceoff.jpg\n\nImage 4 - http://www.laxcoachmike.com/fullmembers/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/face-off-photo-2.jpg\n
  • 3 attack men must stay on one side of the field and 3 defense men must stay on the other side along with the goalie. This is the same for both teams. Midfielders are allowed to roam the field and are also allowed to stay back if an attack man or a defense man crosses the field. If there aren’t the right amount of people on each side, the team is considered off sides and that is a penalty. Penalty minutes vary due to severity of the foul and during a penalty the person that commited the foul must sit out for the designated time. The penalties in lacrosse are slashing, tripping, cross-checking, unsportsmanlike conduct, unnecessary roughness, illegal body check and illegal equipment. Illegal equipment includes an illegal lacrosse stick. There are stick checks that allow the referees to check and make sure a lacrosse stick is legal. For men’s lacrosse, the top of the ball must not be showing when in the pocket of the stick or it is considered illegal. The ball must be able to roll out of the top of the stick before getting perpendicular to the ground or it is illegal. The referee also checks the length; short sticks must be between 40 and 42 inches and long sticks must be between 52 and 72 inches, usually close to 72 for easier defense. Stick checks usually happen when there is a stoppage of play like a time out or a coach can call for one if he deems it necessary. This rule was put into place because if the pocket on a stick is too deep it is a lot harder to get the ball out.\n\nImage - http://www.elixirind.com/media/images/uploads/lacrosse%20goal%2001.jpg\n
  • This is all the equipment used in men’s lacrosse. Perhaps the most essential part is the helmet and mouth guard. They protect against concussions and other injuries to the head. Then there are the shoulder pads, arm pads, and gloves that protect your body against getting slashed or hit by an another stick. Rib pads are optional and are just for extra rib protection. Lastly cleats provide grip to the field like in other sports. Regular football cleats will do the job lacrosse cleats aren’t a necessity.\n\nImage - http://znqbjrhm.cz.cc/in.cgi?2&seoref=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fimgres%3Fimgurl%3Dhttp%3A%2F%2Ffiles.leagueathletics.com%2FImages%2FClub%2F1554%2Fmensreqequip.gif%26imgrefurl%3Dhttp%3A%2F%2Faidigit.com%2Fgreensolutions%2Flacrosse-equipment-diagram%2526page%253D2%26usg%3D__psM2surn_ZJb6WAqBLbjYjAe_rI%3D%26h%3D600%26w%3D363%26sz%3D46%26hl%3Den%26start%3D0%26sig2%3D3kXhmZMb5yY9excbnjTLnQ%26zoom%3D1%26tbnid%3DRG99toIBtjEM6M%3A%26tbnh%3D157%26tbnw%3D95%26ei%3Dfb_ATbSWDcjZgQf28b3gBQ%26prev%3D%2Fsearch%253Fq%253Dlacrosse%252Bstick%252Bdiagram%2526um%253D1%2526hl%253Den%2526safe%253Dactive%2526rlz%253D1G1GGLQ_ENUS295%2526biw%253D1140%2526bih%253D615%2526tbm%253Disch0%252C56%26um%3D1%26itbs%3D1%26iact%3Dhc%26vpx%3D815%26vpy%3D151%26dur%3D390%26hovh%3D289%26hovw%3D175%26tx%3D80%26ty%3D190%26page%3D1%26ndsp%3D18%26ved%3D1t%3A429%2Cr%3A10%2Cs%3A0%26biw%3D1140%26bih%3D615&parameter=$keyword&se=$se&ur=1&HTTP_REFERER=http%3A%2F%2Faidigit.com%2Fgreensolutions%2Flacrosse-equipment-diagram%26page%3D2&default_keyword=default\n
  • This is a picture taken by myself of a stick that is considered legal during a stick check. The top of the ball cannot be seen from the side view.\n\nPersonal image\n
  • This is a picture of the same stick being illegal. I loosened the bottom string and that allowed the pocket to get bigger. As you can see the top of the ball can be seen, therefore it is illegal. Now that you know the basic rules, this video is going to show you some shooting and basic moves in lacrosse to get by your defender, these are called dodges.\n\nPersonal image\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Defensemen have different lacrosse sticks than the other players, we call them d poles or long poles. They are 6 feet in length and this allows them to hit the ball out of the offensive players stick a lot easier compared to a close to 3 foot long short pole. Long poles usually cover attack men but since there are allowed to be 4 on the field at once, one long pole covers a midfielder. There are only allowed to be a maximum of 4 long poles on the field at once and if there are more then it is a penalty. You are allowed to not have any long poles on the field at once but that would be an extreme disadvantage. \n\nPersonal information\nImage - http://www.nll.com/community/images/comprofiler/plug_profilegallery/25005479/pg_451689840.jpg\n
  • This is how a boys lacrosse field looks from the sky. The dotted lines on the field represent the restraining box. Once the offense leaves the box they have 10 seconds to get it back in or it is a turnover. They can keep the ball moving in the box for as long as they want but if stopped for a long period of time the referee can call a stall warning. This means that the offense can not take the ball out of the restraining box or it is a turnover. The offense is not allowed in the crease and the defense is unless they too have the ball. The goalie is allowed to come out of the crease but if he has the ball he can’t go back in the crease. All players sub from a box along the sideline and cannot go on the field until the player they are subbing for gets off.\n\nImage - http://www.rhslacrosse.com/archive/rivlax2001/images/thefield.gif\n
  • Paul Rabil is one of the most famous lacrosse players of all time. He can shoot 111 miles per hour, which is the fastest shot in lacrosse. People like him are what kids today look up to and without college lacrosse and Major League Lacrosse, the sport would not be where it is today. In Major League Lacrosse only 18 of the 23 players get dressed for the games and the 5 that don’t, don’t get paid. Salaries for major league lacrosse players range from $10,000 to $30,000. Those that have sponsorships make more than that but the others who don’t usually have a job on the side to make an adequate amount of money.\n\nImage 1 - http://lswhs.leesummit.k12.mo.us/stuwebpages/6th10/Baker_lacrosse/Images/paul.jpg\nImage 2 - http://www.lacrosseplayground.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/rabils.jpg\n
  • When I first picked Lacrosse as my SGP topic, I thought to sell merchandise for an organization called the HEADstrong foundation. As a team, we require everyone to have HEADstrong laces for every game since my freshman year. I knew I wanted to sell laces to my team mates and when I contacted them they allowed me to get their travel shipment of merchandise. \n\nImage - http://www.headstrongfoundation.org/\n
  • The founder of the HEADstrong foundation was Nick Collelouri. He was a graduate of Ridley High School, which is not too far from here, and then he went on to Hofstra University to play Division 1 lacrosse. In his sophomore year in college he was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. He then created the HEADstrong Foundation to help people like him who are fighting this disease. Our lacrosse team has been buying HEADstrong shoe laces to put in our shoes for every single game to honor Nick.\n\nSource - "Our Founder." HEADstrong Foundation. N.p., 2011. Web. 2 Mar. 2011.     \n<http://www.headstrongfoundation.org/about/headstrongfounder/>. I used this site to get to know Nick Collelouri a little more and to get the \n     right information about him. He is the founder of the HEADstrong Foundation and the reason that the whole Foundation is still alive today. His family \n     wants to raise money to help people with the same cancer that he had.\n\n\n\n
  • Lymphoma is a general name for cancer of the lymphatic system and there are various types of Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma depending on the cell type that is involved. The lymphatic system is an important part of your body because it fights against infections and drains excess fluids from the tissues. As you can see in the picture, bone marrow is part of the lymphatic system and it produces new blood cells so if it becomes effected by the cancer it can spread throughout the body quickly. Cancer can be caused by exposure to radiation and cancer causing chemicals. Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma usually occurs in men from the age of 60 to 70 but can occur for no apparent reason at any age.\n\nImage - http://www.bestfootforward.us/Content/images/si1174.jpg\nSource - McCoy, Krisha MS. Adult Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Conditions & Procedures InBrief. \n     Nucleus Medical Media, 1 Sept. 2010. Web. 3 Mar. 2011. \n     <http://search.ebscohost.com/ \n     login.aspx?direct=true&db=cmh&AN=HL11694&site=chc-live>. I used this \n     report to learn about Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma which is the cancer that Nick \n     Collelouri died of. It has very detailed information about the cancer and \n     it really helped with my presentation\n\n
  • These are pictures from my mom’s work where I sold HEADstrong shirts. I also sold the shirts in our high school but they were a bigger hit in the hospital because my mom works at the cancer center. Everyone working there knew that their money was going to a good cause so some even donated money without buying a shirt. \n
  • The back of the shirts say Relentless because that’s how nick was when he fought the cancer. He never gave up and did everything he could to help others along with himself. His number while playing lacrosse was 27 so to carry on his legacy, it is on the back of every HEADstrong shirt.\n
  • All in all, I raised $1,290 dollars for the HEADstrong foundation. This was really important to me because I never did that many things to help other people so I researched what this whole foundation was about and it really touched my heart. As a fellow lacrosse player, I wanted to do anything I could do to help and I can’t wait to see how the money that I have raised is used to help a cancer patient in need.\n
  • Nick fought the cancer for 14 months. During those 14 months he still worked out on a regular basis and helped other patients. He played in his last lacrosse game in August of 2006. He later passed away on November 28th, 2006. He was only 21 years of age. His family has carried on his legacy ever since through the HEADstrong Foundation. \n\nSource and image - "Our Founder." HEADstrong Foundation. N.p., 2011. Web. 2 Mar. 2011. \n     <http://www.headstrongfoundation.org/about/headstrongfounder/>. I \n     used this site to get to know Nick Collelouri a little more and to get the \n     right information about him. He is the founder of the HEADstrong Foundation \n     and the reason that the whole Foundation is still alive today. His family \n     wants to raise money to help people with the same cancer that he had.\n\n
  • What is one thing you would like to do before you die and why? I want to ask this because Nick was a normal kid just like any of us and all of the sudden he was diagnosed with cancer. This took everything away from him that he was used to and landed him in a hospital bed.\n\nImage - http://www.comingsoon.net/gallery/23034/Bucket_List_poster.jpg\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Just think about being diagnosed with cancer and knowing that you have to fight for your life. All of the little things start to matter less and you take everything for granted.\n\nSource - headstrongfoundation.org\n
  • boyksgp

    1. 1. INSIDE LACROSSE ROBBY BOYKPERIOD 10 MS. RIEGER
    2. 2. Thesis/PurposeTo research the historyof lacrosse, raise moneyfor an important cancerfoundation associatedwith lacrosse, and teachothers how to play thesport.
    3. 3. Personal RelevanceLacrosse is very important tome because I fell in love with itfrom the first time I saw a highschool lacrosse game. Itopened new doors for me andallowed me to become moredisciplined, more athletic, andmake more friends. It’s time tolet the world in on thisamazing sport, since not toomany people know the rules ofthe game.
    4. 4. Origins TheoryHaudenosaunee game of lacrosse Mohawk Oneida Onondaga Cayuga Seneca Tuscarora
    5. 5. Actual OriginsSoutheastThen spread to the North
    6. 6. Research of the SportSoutheastern Tribes - CherokeeGreat Lakes Tribes - Santee DakotaNortheastern Tribes - Iroquois
    7. 7. FactsIntense TrainingCheatingWar-like nature
    8. 8. More FactsOnly MalesNo HandsNamed by the French
    9. 9. ExpandingEast-Coast sport mainlyFastest growing sport
    10. 10. Rules of Boys Lacrosse10 on 10 including goaliesMust go for ballFace-offs
    11. 11. RulesOff sidesPenaltiesStick checks
    12. 12. Lacrosse Equipment
    13. 13. Offense
    14. 14. Defense
    15. 15. LONG POLE
    16. 16. Paul Rabil
    17. 17. ApplicationRaised money for the HEADstrong foundationShirtsLaces
    18. 18. HEADstrong FoundationNick CollelouriRidley High School Get HEADstrong Foundation shirts or shoe laces to help raise money for the fight against blood cancer. For shirts, pick any of the colors above and sizes from Small to XXL for only $15. Shoe Laces are $10. Limited supply of both items. See Robby Boyk (in green above) ROBERT P BOYK Thursday, February 24, 2011 4:25:38 PM ET
    19. 19. Non-Hodgkin’sLymphomaGeneral NameLymphatic System
    20. 20. SHIRT SALESCHESTER COUNTY HOSPITAL
    21. 21. RELENTLESS 27
    22. 22. $1,290
    23. 23. The Fight14 monthsStill worked outregularlyNovember 28, 2006
    24. 24. Class ActivityWhat is one thing you would like to do beforeyou die and why?
    25. 25. Works Cited Atonwah, Wi:se. “Lacrosse: Ancient Haudenosaunee Game.” Editorial. Peace 4 Turtle Island. Kanatiyosh, Dec. 2001. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. a href="http://www.peace4turtleisland.org/" rel="nofollow">http://www.peace4turtleisland.org/‌pages/‌lacrossewise.htm>. The main point to why I am using this article is because it tells a tale about how these two gods played a version of lacrosse in order to see who would be the one to create humans. Teharonhiawakon won and became the Great-Creator.Then after he created the people he passed down stories of their origins and the game of lacrosse.Frank, J. L. “LAUNCHED BY LACROSSE.” Louisville Magazine May 2006: 32-35. Print. J.L. Frank wrote this article to explain that in Kentucky in 1997there was barely any interest in a sport called lacrosse. There would only be about 16 boys trying out for St. X high school in Kentucky. Then heexplains how by 2006 the sport has exploded. There is now almost enough teams to create a league and make it an official sport in Kentucky. Thisarticle was written in 2006 and it says that in 2008 lacrosse is expected to be a varsity sport for boys at the University of Louisville. This relates tomy topic because it shows how lacrosse went from just a sport played by a couple dads back in the day to a huge sport now being played in high schoolsand colleges.McCluney, Eugene B. “Lacrosse: The Combat of the Spirits.” American Indian Quarterly 1: 34-42. JSTOR. Web. 23 Dec. 2010. a href="http://www.jstor.org%3E" rel="nofollow">http://www.jstor.org>;. This Journal entry was very well written about how lacrosse was actually invented. It wasstarted by the French and the Native Americans. They had 2 foot long sticks with the top curved into a loop and the net made out of deer thongs tostop the ball from passing through. The name was termed by the French. The article goes into detail of how the sport was made and and why it wasstarted: for religious reasons. It is perfect for my project because it explains in detail how lacrosse used to be played.
    26. 26. (Continued) McPhee, John. “PIONEER.” New Yorker 22 Mar. 2010: 34-37. Print. John McPhee wrote this to share a coach’s story about how he spread lacrosse. It is relevant to my topic because it explains how lacrosse is spread around the country and how it came to be what it is today. This article is about a lacrosse coach named Bill Tierney who was a successful coach at Princeton but got a call from the University of Denver about who they could find to be their coach. They asked Tierney to coach for them and he decided that he was definitely going to do it since there were only two big lacrosse schools on that side of the Mississippi. He was going to show that lacrosse is not just an Eastern United States game, but anyone in the U.S. can play it and be successful. This pioneered lacrosse and spread it around the country. It is safe to say that more people are playing lacrosse around the country then ever before. It is a fast growing sport and that is what this article is about.Price, S. L. “PRIDE OF A NATION.” Sports Illustrated 19 July 2010: 60-71. Print. S. L. Price wrote this article to show that the Iroquois started andstill play lacrosse today and it explains the history of lacrosse which is why I picked it. This article is about a lacrosse team called the IroquoisNationals who plays internationally and started from just playing with wooden sticks on their sacred lands. The game that we know today is based off ofwhat they played. Lyons leads the team, an Onondaga protector of Native Traditions, and assembles all of his players in the tribe to beat the EnglishNational team. Their main game is box lacrosse which is lacrosse inside a hockey rink without ice. It is currently played all over and there are manyNative American players who play professionally and on a college level for lacrosse.Vennum, Thomas, Jr. “Native American History of Lacrosse.” Editorial. http://www.laxhistory.com/‌. LaxHistory, 2001. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. ahref="http://www.laxhistory.com/%3E" rel="nofollow">http://www.laxhistory.com/>;. This article goes well into detail about the origins of lacrosse andhow it came to be such a fast growing sport today. It talks about how the game used to be played and what kind of role it played in Native Americanculture. All of the tribes have different variations of the game and the present day game is based off of the New England tribes sport.
    27. 27. (Continued) Freed, Stanley A. "Lacrosse yesterday and today."Cobblestone 15.9 (1994): 32. History Reference Center. EBSCO. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. This article goes into detail about the deadlysport, back then not called lacrosse, and how it has developed over the years. The game of lacrosse is not quite like it was whenthe Native Americans first started playing it, we have modified it severely but it is still along the same lines.
    28. 28. Conclusion“Make use of the time you have and don’t stressthe little things. Have a smile and enjoy what you can get out of life.” -Nick Collelouri

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