Annual Training 2013
Washington State National Guard  –  June 2013

MEDIVAC REHEARSAL
Charlie Med Dusts Off at Range 55

S...
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2   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
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Cover Top​	 MEDEVAC training at the Yakima
Training Center June 12. U.S. Army photo by Sgt
Andrea E. Meyer.
Cover ...
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4   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
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Chaplain’s Message

right  A Paladin from the 2-146 firing at the Yakima Training
Center at dusk during the June ...
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6   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
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Practice means the difference
between life and death
181st Brigade Support Battalion, C Company conducts air ambu...
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bottom  Some of the
soldiers that participated in
MEDEVAC training, Pfc. Jess T.
Yeh, Spc, Matthew R. Johnson,
Sp...
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bottom  81st ABCT medics,
and combat engineers, unload
a mock patient, June 12. Photo
by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer.

b...
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right  Soldiers of 161 Charlie
company headquarters
platoon, take a second to
get a group photo moments
before the...
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81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   11
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U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer

Sgt. Jason D. Johnson enjoys
some fresh air on the top of his
tank at th...
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81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   13
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bottom  Some of the qualified soldiers that run the 81st
BSTB DFAC at the Yakima
Training Center.
Photo by Spc. J...
AT 2013
bottom  Close up of the main
knob on the stove used to
cook the daily meals served to
soldiers at this year’s Annu...
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right  Sgt. Clark R. Yoder, a
UAV operator supervisor with
the 81st BSTB, proudly shows
off the RQ-7B UAV. U.S. Ar...
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the UAVs, though their role was a bit
different from Yoder.
They sat in the back of a humvee-mounted shelter, and ...
AT 2013

18   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
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left  181st Brigade Support
Battalion, C Company conducting MEDEVAC training at
the Yakima Training Center
June 12...
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Keeping Data Sailing
A yacht-racing Soldier keeps the 81st Brigade
data networks up and running
by Staff Sgt. E. ...
AT 2013

Bottom  Photo courtesy of Sandeman Yacht Company

81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   21
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22   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
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Fueling the Fire

Keeping the lights on for the Brigade HQ
by Spc. Jon T. Taylor
Imagine a Tactical Operations Ce...
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Soldiers
finding
balance

can use in their careers as soldiers and
vice versa.
The 81st Brigade Special Troops
Ba...
AT 2013
Aeronautical Schemes. Preparing the
load plan of an airplane, operating and
doing checks and services on planes
ta...
AT 2013
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81st Brigade Annual Training Magazine

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Great Magazine produced by the 81st Brigade, Public Affairs Office, Washington Army National Guard featuring the citizen-soldiers of the Washington Army National Guard while serving their two weeks on Annual Training at the Yakima Training Center.

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81st Brigade Annual Training Magazine

  1. 1. Annual Training 2013 Washington State National Guard  –  June 2013 MEDIVAC REHEARSAL Charlie Med Dusts Off at Range 55 SKILLS THAT PAY THE BILLS Soldiers Speak Out About the Skills They Use on Duty and Off
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  3. 3. AT 2013 Cover Top​ MEDEVAC training at the Yakima Training Center June 12. U.S. Army photo by Sgt Andrea E. Meyer. Cover Center Left A Paladin from the 2-146 firing at the Yakima Training Center firing down range during the June 2013 annual training. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. E. James Omelina Cover Center Right 1st Lt. Jordan B. Villeneuve, of the 161 Charlie Company, smiles big for his tanker’s chance at qualifying the multipurpose training range. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. Cover Center Bottom 81 ABCT Soldiers during this year’s Annual Training. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. E. James Omelina Left 1st Lt. Peter D. Taylor and Sgt. Jeffery Sandell of the 161 Charlie Company headquarters platoon, prepare for their turn at the multipurpose training range at Yakima Training Center. U.S. Army photo by Spc. Jon T. Taylor. Annual Training 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Public Affairs Non-Commissioned Officer Staff Sergeant E. James Omelina Public Affairs Specialists Sergeant Andrea Meyer Specialist Jon T. Taylor Designer Staff Sergeant E. James Omelina Page 5 Brigade Chaplain’s Message Page 8 Charlie MEDEVAC Training Page 10 Dances with Tanks Page 14 KP Duty: A Day in the Life Page 16 Eye in the Sky Page 19 When Careers Converge Page 20 Keeping Data Sailing Page 23 Fueling the Fire Page 24 Soldiers Finding Balance Photographers First Lieutenant Austin Danielek Staff Sergeant E. James Omelina Sergeant Andrea Meyer Specialist Jon T. Taylor Special thanks to The men and women of the 81st Armored Brigade Combat team and their families. To absent friends. This we will defend. Contact 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Staff Sergeant E. James Omelina edward.j.omelina.mil@mail.mil or ejomelina@gmail.com 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   3
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  5. 5. AT 2013 Chaplain’s Message right  A Paladin from the 2-146 firing at the Yakima Training Center at dusk during the June 2013 annual training. Photo by Staff Sgt E. James Omelina bottom  Major David Hatheway, 81st ABCT Chaplain I am one of those guys that came into the Guard somewhat late in life at the age of thirty-eight. This has some advantages and disadvantages. One disadvantage is that when people see the gray hair and rank, the assumption is that I have been around forever, and thus know exactly what I am doing. But the advantage is that I am able to bring my years of civilian education and job experience into my Guard duties. In addition to having sixteen years of clergy work as a minister to youth and families, I have spent the last six years working as a commercial glazier, installing glass curtain wall and storefront, for a Seattle company. In the last two years I have been a job foreman. So how does this benefit the Guard? There are four good answers. The first is, providing guidance and direction in accomplishing a mission. The “...the advantage is that I am able to bring my years of civilian education and job experience into my Guard duties.” Major David Hatheway Brigade Chaplain second is, placing a higher value on people over products. The third is, bringing out the best in each and every person. And the fourth is, returning home safe at the end of the day. Some of my favorite phrases that I use in both my civilian and military roles are: “What do you need to succeed?” “How can I be of service to you today?” “Keep your eye on the prize.” “Go. Fight. Win!” I am grateful that my civilian experiences have set me up for success in the Guard. The reverse is also true, my guard experience is helping me in my civilian career. GO GUARD! Go, Fight Win! CH (MAJ) David Hatheway BDE Chaplain 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   5
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  7. 7. AT 2013 Practice means the difference between life and death 181st Brigade Support Battalion, C Company conducts air ambulance MEDEVAC training at the Yakima Training Center, June 12. Preparing for casualty evacuation is a vital part of a soldier’s training. 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   7
  8. 8. AT 2013 bottom  Some of the soldiers that participated in MEDEVAC training, Pfc. Jess T. Yeh, Spc, Matthew R. Johnson, Spc. Tyron L. Earnest, 1sg. Chris M. Edwards, 2nd LT. Drew J. Nevins, at a range at Yakima Training Center, June 12. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. right  Sgt. 1st Class Paris N. Purnhagen prepares to brief soldiers participating in the medical evacuation rehersal at the Yakima Training Center. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. Charlie MEDEVAC Training A soldier lies on the ground, screaming for help. A group of medics hear his cries and rush to his aid. The soldier thrashes as others struggle to hold him down and treat his injuries. In just a few minutes, he is stabilized and hoisted onto a stretcher by four of the medics and shuffled at break-neck speed towards a waiting Medical Evacuation helicopter, as others keep an eye out for the enemy. It sounds like a battle, but in reality, these soldiers are in the middle of very important training. Soldiers from 181st Brigade Support Battalion, C. company, based out of Marysville, WA participated in MEDEVAC training, June 14, at Yakima Training Center, WA. Sgt. 1st Class Paris N. Purnhagen was the medical NCOIC, and was in charge of the training that day. “I didn’t do all the work” said Purnhagen. “I can’t do it without my joes.” The purpose of the training was for her troops to hone and maintain their skills at triage and medical treatment, she said. The training was in support of the brigade and would help the medics 8   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
  9. 9. AT 2013 bottom  81st ABCT medics, and combat engineers, unload a mock patient, June 12. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. bottom  81st ABCT medics, and combat engineers, race toward an air ambulance, June 12. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. of her unit learn how to correctly MEDEVAC patients under any scenario. Purnhagen said that every month her unit does a little training at a time, and she has to designate soldiers among the different tasks essential for MEDEVAC operations. This made it so that every soldier was trained in the different roles necessary for treating injured soldiers on the battlefield. It was very important that her soldiers train hard and get it right. “I didn’t do all the work. I can’t do it without my Joes.” Sgt. 1st Class Paris N. Purnhagen They only get to do the training once a month and then a few weeks out of the year, when the unit goes to the field, she said. Purgenhagen said it was essential that the medics trained correctly. They had to keep the MEDEVAC training as similar as possible to a real-life situation overseas. “Communication is vital”, said Purnhagen. Her soldiers had to keep communicating with each other and be aware of what the other soldiers in their team were doing at all times, she said. Purnhagen also said that it was essential that the medics train with the soldiers in other units throughout the brigade. “It’s about building stronger bonds between the medics and the units,” said Purnhagen. Sgt. Andrea E Meyer 81st ABCT Public Affairs Specialist left  81st ABCT medics, and combat engineers, participate in MEDEVAC training at a range at Yakima Training Center, June 12. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   9
  10. 10. AT 2013 right  Soldiers of 161 Charlie company headquarters platoon, take a second to get a group photo moments before they go off to qualify at the multipurpose range at the Yakima Training Center. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer Dances with tanks 161st Infantry Regiment Charlie Company, qualifies tank crews during annual training at Yakima Training Center by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer A rumble is heard in the distance, as the treads of a tank revolve slowly, making a clanking noise as it rolls along. A loud whining sound pierces the air as the turbine engine that powers this mechanical behemoth increases speed. The tank crawls along the ground with ease, climbing over rocks, hills and plants without a problem. It’s turret raises as the soldiers inside take aim at a target thousands of meters away. With a flash of fire and a puff of smoke, a round is shot and the target is demolished. This isn’t a far away field overseas, but a range where tankers perfect their skills. top  A soldier of 161 Charlie company, demonstrates the amount of head room in the driver seat. Soldiers from the 161st Infantry Regiment, Charlie company, qualified their crews on the M1-A1 Abrams tank, June 17, at Yakima Training Center, WA. 1st Lt. Peter D. Taylor was the executive officer of C. company, and had been training with his unit for months in preparation for annual training. Taylor said that during the training, his unit would be focusing on safety, firing procedures, medical assistance, crew evacuation, bore sighting and basic function checks. The training “We practice, eat, sleep and we do everything together. We’re like a reality TV show.” Sgt. Norm R. Loethen essential to identifying weaknesses in the crews’ equipment and honing their skills. “You can have the best tankers in the world, but one little glitch and your tank is done,” he said. Spc. Sephiroth W. Pierce, a tank crew-member with 2nd platoon said that the training was all about achieving proficiency, but there were definitely elements of the training that he enjoyed. “These things are fun to drive and shoot,” said Pierce. “Each tank crew is like a family.” Sgt. Norm R. Loethen said that teamwork was a very important element to the success of tankers, and it was developed during the bonding that took place when crews were training in the field. “We practice, eat, sleep, and we do everything together, “ he said. “We’re like a reality TV show.” 1st Lt. Jordan B. Villenuve is a tank commander from 3rd platoon, and has two years of experience with the company. “You need to demonstrate that you can take your tank out and shoot,” he said. “If you can master the task at hand, it shows that you’re proficient with the weapons system.” was meant to get soldiers familiar with their equipment and to help them perfect the more technical aspects of tank operations. Villanuve also said that he too enjoyed the camaraderie and challenge it took to work with the tanks, and that training with them was fun. Sgt. Jason D. Johnson, a tank crew member with 1st platoon, said that the training was “It’s a big gun,” said Villanuve. “You can’t go wrong with that.” 10   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
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  12. 12. AT 2013 U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer Sgt. Jason D. Johnson enjoys some fresh air on the top of his tank at the Yakima Training Center Sgt. Jason D. Johnson, a tank crew member with 1st platoon, said that the training was essential to identifying weaknesses in the crews’ equipment and honing their skills. “These things are fun to drive and shoot. Each crew is like a family.” Spc. Sephiroth W. Pierce 12   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
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  14. 14. AT 2013 bottom  Some of the qualified soldiers that run the 81st BSTB DFAC at the Yakima Training Center. Photo by Spc. Jon T. Taylor. right  Sgt. Monica P. Alvarez, NCOIC of the 81st BSTB DFAC team, reads the nutritional facts on the back of canned foods while preparing that day’s dinner chow for 81st ABCT 2013 Annual Training. Photo by Spc. Jon T. Taylor. KP Duty: A Day In the Life by Spc. Jon T. Taylor With a quick flip of a switch, a soft buzz erupts from above. After a few moments, each utterly dim light flickers to a standstill. Just like the movie Joe Versus the Volcano, I find myself in Tom Hanks’s shoes, wondering why every other light is brighter than mine. As sounds from the kitchen begin to roar, and pots and pans begin to clink and clank, I quickly realize that I’m in a junior Soldier’s worst nightmare: Kitchen Preparation, or more commonly known as KP duty. A day in the life of a 92G, a food service specialist. For the love of Betty Crocker, do not call them that. “We’re culinary specialists,” said Spc. Doug R. Brown of the 81st BSTB Annual Training DFAC team. The normal staff size varies by unit, but today’s team consisted of five 92G’s, and one KP staff member per 50 soldiers. “1 per 50 soldiers for KP,” according to Spc. Kory L. Caze of the 81srt BSTB DFAC team. “That never happens!” 14   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
  15. 15. AT 2013 bottom  Close up of the main knob on the stove used to cook the daily meals served to soldiers at this year’s Annual Training. Photo by Spc. Jon T. Taylor. bottom  Spc. Doug R. Brown, of the 81st BSTB DFAC team, prepares onions. Photo by Spc. Jon T. Taylor. On my day for KP, we had seven KP members. Our mission was to help serve up to 900 meals in one day. Working with only one-third of the normal staff, I’m quickly understanding why every junior Soldier dreads doing this duty, it’s a lot of work. “You wanna see something really cool,” beamed Spc. Brown with a devilish smile. His eyes blazed with intensity, the kind of look the Grinch had while plotting to steal Christmas from the citizens of Whoville. Off we went to a giant hot tub time machine, well, at least that’s what I called it. Spc. Brown’s name for it was ‘tilt grill.’ In it, a giant sea of ground beef, chopped onions, and spices that were slowly cooking. “How many pounds,” I asked. “50 to 55,” Spc. Brown said. I gulped again, but this time, it was because I was hungry for the beef gravy he was cooking. The team is under a lot of pressure. The crew spends countless hours on paperwork, planning what goes into creating a menu, ordering food, and even food preparation. “We’d rather have the soldier wait an extra five minutes for a fully cooked meal than serve them something that’s not prepared correctly,” Spc. Caze said. Sgt. Monica P. Alvarez, the NCOIC of the 81st BSTB DFAC at the Yakima Training Center, handles a lot of paperwork, and relies heavily on her soldiers to do the right thing when she’s not overseeing the main operation. “We’ve had a few hiccups, but we don’t do this everyday. It’s all about getting a routine and getting the wheels greased to roll,” said Sgt. Alvarez. left  Spc. Doug R. Brown, of the 81st BSTB DFAC team, carefully slices and dices onions for that evening’s 55 lbs of ground beef to help feed the soldiers at Annual Training. Photo by Spc. Jon T. Taylor. 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   15
  16. 16. AT 2013 right  Sgt. Clark R. Yoder, a UAV operator supervisor with the 81st BSTB, proudly shows off the RQ-7B UAV. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. Eye in the sky 81st Brigade flies UAVs at Yakima Training Center by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer A propeller begins to turn as a small engine sputters to life, making a loud, strained buzz that splits the air. A couple of soldiers stand nearby, earplugs in and safety glasses on, anticipating the moment to come. Another soldier gives a signal, and Sgt. Clark R. Yoder is a UAV operator supervisor. With his radio and clipboard ready at hand, he monitored the other troops operating the vehicles and oversaw nearly everything that went on with the flights and the training. “Soldiers like having the eye in the sky. It’s like big brother from above.” Yoder said that UAVs were essential to overseas operations and missions, and that many deployed ground troops didn’t want to go on missions that weren’t assisted by the UAVs. Sgt. Clark R. Yoder within seconds, a puff of smoke shoots from the tail of the aircraft. With surprising speed the small airplane zips off its launcher and high into the air. It eventually circles at 6,000 feet. The aircraft doesn’t have a pilot, at least not in the conventional sense. It is an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Soldiers from the 81st BSTB were hard at work, checking their maintenance logs, monitoring video screens and lining up cones and nets along the runway during annual training on June 13, at Yakima Training Center. The training is in preparation for real-world missions overseas, in which UAVs are launched to gather information and locate targets. “Soldiers like having the eye in the sky,” he said. “It’s like big brother from above.” According to Sgt. Yoder, the RQ-7B UAVs can stay in the air for six hours at a time, and helped the U.S. Mission overseas by providing essential information for the U.S. Army. There are different kinds of UAVs, but the ones that Yoder worked with were used to give soldiers a ‘bird’s eye view’ of what was going on at the battlefield. Spc. Jacob L. Gappmayer and Spc. Adam J. Torres, were also operators of left  A group of soldiers from the 81st BSTB setting up a RQ-7B UAV for its next mission. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. 16   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team right  The 81st BSTB’s RQ-7B UAV, just from taking off, climbing the skies to get to monitoring height Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer.
  17. 17. AT 2013 the UAVs, though their role was a bit different from Yoder. They sat in the back of a humvee-mounted shelter, and monitored video screens, which played the footage captured by the UAV’s camera. The detail and information gathering abilities of the RQ-7B UAVs is amazing, said Torres. During overseas missions, the UAVs could be launched in shifts, so that one was in an area, monitoring events on the ground at all times. When one UAV was low on fuel, another could take its place. Gappmayer said that he loved the technical emphasis of his job, which was a challenge. It was an exciting thing to be a part of. Soldiers in his unit were commended for their abilities and the focus on the mission was the main emphasis. “The greatest thing about this job is that the rank doesn’t matter,” said Gappmayer. Getting the job done was the focus and that was what he enjoyed. Top  A grounded RQ-7B UAV, prepped and ready for takeoff. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. left  Spc. Jacob L. Gappmayer of the 81st BSTB, operating a RQ-7B UAV from the main control center. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. right  (close to far) Spc. Adam J. Torres from Ft. Lewis, and Spc. Jacob L. Gappmayer of the 81st BSTB, manually operate a RQ-7B UAV from the ground. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   17
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  19. 19. AT 2013 left  181st Brigade Support Battalion, C Company conducting MEDEVAC training at the Yakima Training Center June 12. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. bottom  Spc. Ross M. Coyle of the C company 181st brigade support battalion, smiling for the camera as he preps medical supplies for MEDEVAC training that’ll be held during annual training. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. When careers converge by Staff Sgt. E. James Omelina Journalism and medicine seem to be very different career fields but one National Guard Soldier uses these different disciplines to benefit his fellow soldiers. Spc. Ross M. Coyle is a health care specialist with 181st brigade support battalion when on duty, but when he is off-duty he is a freelance journalist. The 181st brigade support battalion is on of the elements of the 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team. Coyle is part of C company, also known as “Charlie med.” Charlie med supports soldiers in the brigade by providing medical services for the approximately 2,900 soldiers who make up the 81st ABCT. Journalism and medicine both share the need to communicate with an individual said, Coyle. “Communication is a very important thing. With journalism there will always be a need to communicate ideas clearly, simply and effectively to the population. Medicine has the same need to communicate ideas clearly and effectively to patients.” Coyle originally joined the Guard in Eugene, Oregon about 4 years ago. He is currently looking for work in the journalism field but will continue to use his unique blend of skills in his service to the National Guard. “It’s fun. It can be a lot of fun when you’re crawling around on top of tanks or tracked vehicles, or riding “It can be a lot of fun when your crawling around on top of tanks...” According to Coyle getting a patient to tell you how they were hurt can be a challenge for a variety of reasons. Sometimes a patient is embarrassed or reluctant to tell a medic what happened to them, he said. “Interviewing is a big factor in both fields,” said Coyle. “Journalism makes you more inquisitive.” around on HMMWVs,” said Coyle about his service in the Washington State National Guard. “It’s not something people get to do a lot of. And it’s still a fun experience. There are some dull moments, but when it’s fun it can be a lot of fun.” 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   19
  20. 20. AT 2013 Keeping Data Sailing A yacht-racing Soldier keeps the 81st Brigade data networks up and running by Staff Sgt. E. James Omelina Imagine a world with no internet. And no phones. It could be a nightmare, especially for a unit like the 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team. Spc. Kevin Sorensen, a Joint Nodal Network team leader for the Brigade Special Troops Battalion , Bravo Company, keeps the brigade’s information sailing at full speed. Spc. Sorenson is responsible for setting up and maintaining the 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team’s computer network and phone system when they are deployed. His attention to detail, which he attributes to sailing, ensures that thousands of physical and digital connections keep the 81st ABCT on an even keel. Racing sailboats with my dad has taught me to communicate with my crew, said Sorenson. “My job here is like sailing the boat. On a professional level with my soldiers, just like on the boat, I can do one little thing over here that could mess up another platoon, if I’m not talking to those guys.” 20   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team “It’s a challenge being on the boat with five guys who know their own jobs very well but tend to forget there are four other guys working with them,” said Sorenson. “Each person has to pay attention to what everyone else is doing.” Sorenson said that his sailing experience has taught him the patience and communication skills necessary to lead the team that keeps the 81st ABCT networks up and running. Sorenson said that sailing with his dad and the rest of the crew of the 29 foot sailboat, Quintessence, has taught him teamwork. Sorenson has been sailing and winning races in his hometown of Sequim for more than 10 years. “I love doing what I do in the Guard,” said Sorenson. “I have a lot of fun doing it and I get to work with some really great people.”
  21. 21. AT 2013 Bottom  Photo courtesy of Sandeman Yacht Company 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   21
  22. 22. AT 2013 22   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team
  23. 23. AT 2013 Fueling the Fire Keeping the lights on for the Brigade HQ by Spc. Jon T. Taylor Imagine a Tactical Operations Center without power, and what would you see? No power means no communication systems. There wouldn’t be lights, individual work stations, environmental systems, or tactical maneuver computer systems that are vital to tasks at hand. All these systems are powered by a handful of generators, and these generators run on diesel fuel. Left  Spc. Charles M. Misner, of the 81st HHC BSTB TAC OPS, refuels the generators running the Joint Task Force Tactical Operations Center at Yakima Training Center.Photo by Spc. Jon T. Taylor Bottom  Spc. Charles M. Misner, of the 81st HHC BSTB TAC OPS, shows off his achievements of being tasked as the NCOIC of the generators of the Joint Task Force Tactical Operations Center at Yakima Training Center. Photo by Spc. Jon T. Taylor. “Life is what you make it and if you’re willing to learn, you can do the best you can. If you don’t know something simply ask as you go.” Spc. Charles M. Misner Spc. Charles M. Misner, with Headquarters company, 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team, was assigned the task of non-commissioned officer of the generators at this year’s Washington Army National Guard annual training. Misner handles the maintenance of all the generators for the Joint Task Force Tactical Operations Center. “It’s a lot of work, but I’ve had help,” said Misner. It is a very important job that requires months of advanced individual training, but according to Misner this operation was his first time working with these type of generators. “I felt like Sponge Bob Square Pants, soaking everything up,” said Misner referring to the training he received by the local field service representative at the Yakima Training Center. In preparation for Operation Evergreen Ember, Misner learned how to trouble shoot, maintain, and run the 15 kilowatt and 60 kilowatt Army generators. One of the most important tasks Misner completed was the refueling of the field generators. Misner said that without fuel, the machine breaks down, and could cause some serious damage. “This guy has been running around busting his hump,” said Sgt. Ted M. Fay of the 66th Theater Aviation Command, 81st Brigade Special Troops Battalion out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, “He’s been popping his head in and out of the TOC to see what’s broken and how things are running.” That seems to be a growing trend. Many soldiers are familiar with Misner, his friendly smile, and his positive attitude. “Life is what you make it, and if you’re willing to learn, to do the best you can,” said Spc. Misner. “Life is what you make it and if you’re willing to learn, you can do the best you can. If you don’t know something simply ask as you go.” Inspired by the training on this operation, Misner has a new goal in life. “I want to go to school for this. I want to be a generator technician,” said Misner. 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   23
  24. 24. AT 2013 Soldiers finding balance can use in their careers as soldiers and vice versa. The 81st Brigade Special Troops Battalion, C. company, Combat Engineers is no exception, and during this year’s annual training, there were plenty of troops who felt that their civilian lives enhanced their time in the army. Spc. Ricardo L. Martinez is a soldier with the 81st BSTB, C. company, Combat Engineers, and he loves his military specialty. by Sgt. Andrea M. Meyer The Army National Guard has roughly 300,000 citizen-soldiers. All of them have to find the balance between their civilian lives and their time in the guard. This isn’t always an easy task, but many soldiers find that their civilian lives and jobs teach them useful qualities and skills, which they 24   81st Armored Brigade Combat Team top  Soldiers of the 81st BSTB, C. company, Combat Engineers, participate in a .50 cal range at Yakima Training Center. Martinez coaches (Other soldier) as he aims a .50 Cal steadily downrange. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. middle  Rounds of .50 caliber sitting, watching, and waiting for their time to step up to the plate, and to be fired off- one short burst at a time. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. bottom  Sgt. Schuyler P. Barbeau of the 81st BSTB, C. company, Combat Engineers, sitting in the turret, watches as his unit qualifies on the .50 cal. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. “The best part is blowing stuff up,” said Martinez. “Every combat engineer loves blowing stuff up, and if they don’t, they’re not a true combat engineer.” He also said the he is a flight instructor who has logged 2,500 hours in his civilian life and has a degree in
  25. 25. AT 2013 Aeronautical Schemes. Preparing the load plan of an airplane, operating and doing checks and services on planes taught him to pay attention. Being a flight instructor taught him to ‘lead from the front.’ All of these things were keys to his success as a combat engineer, a job that involved lots of heavy equipment and explosions and could be dangerous. Sgt. Schuyler P. Barbeau, a soldier with the same unit as Martinez, is employed at Boeing as a Final Body Joiner. Barbeau said that he is responsible for joining the head, body and tail of the Boeing 777, a job that requires him to be very disciplined and detail oriented. Those were qualities that being an Non-commissioned officer in the Guard taught him very well. Sgt. Jonathan L. Williams works at a company called Nylatech, “The best part is blowing stuff up. Every combat engineer loves blowing stuff up.” Spc. Ricardo L. Martinez manufacturing everything from ball bearings and roller coaster wheels to practice bats for the Seattle Mariners baseball team. It can be a dangerous job, and once there was an explosion in the factory so loud that the local fire-fighters came without even a 9-11 call. His attention to detail and focus are both qualities that he has taken with him during this Annual Training and throughout his time in the army. Williams said that while both jobs in the private sector and army can be dangerous, the life lessons that he has learned in both of them help to keep him and his soldiers safe. right  Soldiers of 81st BSTB, C. company, Combat Engineers waiting for their time to shoot the .50 cals. Photo by Sgt. Andrea E. Meyer. 81st Armored Brigade Combat Team   25
  26. 26. AT 2013

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