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Instructional Design project for EdTech 544 at SDSU

Instructional Design project for EdTech 544 at SDSU

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  • We will only be learning about the Urban, Chapparal and Riparian habitats in this lesson.

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  • Concrete Jungle:Urban Ecology Online Jessica Ebel& Trudy Pachón EDTEC 544
  • Welcome to Concrete JungleCongratulations!The people of San Diego have elected you for Mayor.The most recent polls show that the citizens areseriously concerned about the environment.According to surveys, the most important issues are: •global warming • endangered species • overpopulation • clean energy • soil and agriculture • water pollution • planning for the futureThe voters think you have what it takes to make San Diego the greenest city in America. Youmight be wondering how you’ll learn to make wise decisions about the environment.Well, this program is designed to train you for your new job. Throughout your training youwill be able to rely on your advisors and other tools to help you build a cleaner, brighter SanDiego.One more thing! If you are successful at cleaning up San Diego, the President of the UnitedStates will allow you to design and build your very own Eco-Friendly city! GOOD LUCK!
  • Create Your CharacterLet’s Get Started!First, you need to create your own avatar. Follow the steps in the tutorial to modify your look!
  • Your AdvisorsHere to Help!These professionals are here to assist you during each of your ecological missions. Gertie Flanders will be Dr. Juliana de Fleur Mungo MacGregor is a Dr. Jen Miyuki is a your secretary. She knows all about air. world famous Scottish “people person”. She’s has worked in the She is head of the explorer and naturalist. in charge of everything Mayor’s Office for over Atmosphere He conducts many over at Population 15 years. Administration . studies in the Life Management. Sciences Laboratory. Professor Filbert Russell Lum is an Dr. Mandira Kapoor, a Dr. Cleo Jones will help Finestein is the leading expert on dirt. You can brilliant Indian chemist, you design your city of scientist at the Energy find him at Soil and works at the Water the future. Find her at Agency. Agriculture Services. Control Center. the HQ for Future Development.
  • Navigation Bar: Click on any building.How To Play: Tools and Resources Checklist: Click the ▼ to see which missions you have completed. ECOPOINTS: You will receive points for every mission you successfully complete. Later, you will be able to use these points when you build your own city! Ask Your Advisor: Click on the character to search for answers to your questions or get helpful reminders and advice. Notebook: This is where you will take notes during labs and activities..Textbook: Use this tool to research topics by chapter or alphabetically. There‟s also aplace to practice vocabulary with flashcards and games.
  • Ready? Let’s start by finding out what youalready know… MISSION CHECKLIST▼PretestThis slide represents the pretest. It will be useful later when comparing pretest andposttest scores for evaluation purposes.The test will be GRE style, adjusting questions to determine overall level. This way,the students will not become discouraged if they are unable to answer the moredifficult questions.NavigationAfter completing the pretest, the students will work through the “Mayor‟s Office”modules, which provide an overview and help them become familiar with theprogram‟s features. Then, the students will learn about biogeochemical cycles, airpollution, and climate change by completing the “Atmosphere Administration”lessons.Our PrototypeFor our prototype, we focused on lessons three and four from the “Life SciencesLaboratory” section. The students will have already finished lessons one and two ECOPOINTS: 000000from this unit, so we will presume that they now understand energy flow and how toclassify groups of animals. For our prototype, we developed the “Owl Investigation”and “Food Chain” activities.
  • Life Sciences Lab Dear Mayor, MISSION CHECKLIST▼ Hullo there! Welcome to mah laboratory! As ye know, mah name‟s MungoMacGregor. Ah‟ll be yore tour guide for this liddle section. Durin‟ the Life Sciences Unit, you‟ll learn all there is tae know aboot nature. We‟ll start wi‟ energy an‟ then you‟ll learn aboot ecosystems. Then, you‟ll get to study some wee, bonny birdies for a bit. An‟ have ye no‟ ever wondered how all the creatures in yore area survive? Och, „tis allusinterestin‟ to learn about food chains and webs! Finally, Ah‟ll take ye aroond San Diego to explore some of the amazin‟ biomes in yore own backyarrrd! It‟s gonna be grrreat, Ah tell ye! ECOPOINTS: 17,000 It‟ll be a challenge, but dinna worry mah fair lads an‟ lassies! Ah‟mgonna be right there to help ye if ye have any questions. Best o‟ luck to ye! ~Mungo
  • Owl InvestigationThis morning, some visitors to San Diegocaptured this incredible footage. MISSION CHECKLIST▼ Dear Mayor, We caught this on film while visiting San Diego. We hope you can tell us more about what we saw. We are very worried about this owlet and want to know if he might be sick. Perhaps you can help us to learn more! Sincerely, The Australian Tourists ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools Your job is to dissect this disgustin’ owl vomit in order to: 1) identify exactly what this little owl ate 2) determine whether this owl is sick 3) make some inferences about the nature of the community in which the owl lives 4) understand what scientists can learn ECOPOINTS: 17,000 from dissecting owl pellets
  • Owl InvestigationFollow the steps to complete the owl pellet dissection. MISSION CHECKLIST▼After that, ye‟ll use a chart to identify what ye discovered!Tools THE STEPS 1. Put your lab gloves on. 2. Use the ruler and scales to measure your owl pellet. 3. Write down some observations about your owl pellet on pages 27 and 28 of your notebook. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 1. Put on your lab gloves. 2. Use the ruler and scales to measure your owl pellet. 3. Write down some observations about your owl pellet on page 27 of your notebook. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 1. Put on your lab gloves. 2. Use the ruler and scales to measure your owl pellet. 3. Write down some observations about your owl pellet on page 27 of your notebook. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 1. Put on your lab gloves. 2. Use the ruler and scales to measure your owl pellet. 3. Write down some observations about your owl pellet on page 27 of your notebook. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 4. Carefully use the dissection probe and tweezers to gently separate the bones from the soft bits and fur. 5. You can use the magnifying glass to zoom in for a closer look. 6. As you remove the bones, place them in the bowl of bleach water. ECOPOINTS: 17,200
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 4. Carefully use the dissection probe and tweezers to gently separate the bones from the soft bits and fur. 5. You can use the magnifying glass to zoom in for a closer look. 6. As you remove the bones, place them in the bowl of bleach water. ECOPOINTS: 17,300
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 7. Gently remove each bone from the bowl of water. 8. Sort the bones into piles. 9. Count the number of skulls and record that in “actual # of skulls” column on page 28 of your notebook. ECOPOINTS: 17,600
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 7. Gently remove each bone from the bowl of water. 8. Sort the bones into piles. 9. Count the number of skulls and record that in “actual # of skulls” column on page 28 of your notebook. ECOPOINTS: 17,600
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 7. Gently remove each bone from the bowl of water. 8. Sort the bones into piles. 9. Count the number of skulls and record that in “actual # of skulls” column on page 28 of your notebook. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 10. Study the Skull Identification Key on Page 29 of your notebook. 11 Use the Dissection Microscope to look closely at each skull. 12. The Bone Charts in your textbook can also help you to determine the species of each skull. ECOPOINTS: 17,700
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 10. Study the Skull Identification Key on Page 29 of your notebook. 11 Use the Dissection Microscope to look closely at each skull. 12. The Bone Charts in your textbook can also help you to determine the species of each skull. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 10. Study the Skull Identification Key on Page 29 of your notebook. 11. Use the Dissection Microscope to look closely at each skull. 12. The Bone Charts in your textbook can also help you to determine the species of each skull. ECOPOINTS: 17,700
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 10. Study the Skull Identification Key on Page 29 of your notebook. 11 Use the Dissection Microscope to look closely at each skull. 12. The Bone Charts in your textbook can also help you to determine the species of each skull. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 13. Record the number of skulls in the chart on page 28 of your notebook. 14. Answer the analysis questions on page 30. If you need help, search for “owl” in your textbook. ECOPOINTS: 17,700
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 13. Record the number of skulls in the chart on page 28 of your notebook. 14. Answer the analysis questions on page 30. If you need help, search for “owl” in your textbook. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 13. Record the number of skulls in the chart on page 28 of your notebook. 14. Answer the analysis questions on page 30. If you need help, search for “owl” in your textbook. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • 2. Why do you think owls need to regurgitate owl pellets?A.They have small stomachs.B. They get sick easily.C. They can‟t digest bones and fur.D. They are being poisoned by pesticides.E. They need to make room for another meal.F. Both C and E.
  • 2. Why do you think owls need to regurgitate owl pellets?A.They have small stomachs.B. They get sick easily.C. They can‟t digest bones and fur.D. They are being poisoned by pesticides.E. They need to make room for another meal.F. Both C and E.
  • 2. Why do you think owls need to regurgitate owl pellets?A.They have small stomachs.B. They get sick easily.C. They can‟t digest bones and fur.D. They are being poisoned by pesticides.E. They need to make room for another meal.F. Both C and E.
  • 2. Why do you think owls need to regurgitate owl pellets?A.They have small stomachs.B. They get sick easily.C. They can‟t digest bones and fur.D. They are being poisoned by pesticides.E. They need to make room for another meal.F. Both C and E.
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 13. Record the number of skulls in the chart on page 28 of your notebook. 14. Answer the analysis questions on page 30. If you need help, search for “owl” in your textbook. ECOPOINTS: 17,000
  • Owl Investigation MISSION CHECKLIST▼Tools THE STEPS 13. CHALLENGE ACTIVITY for BONUS POINTS: Choose one skull. Assemble the rest of the skeleton using the bone sorting charts. No, thanks! ECOPOINTS: 18,000
  • Life Sciences Lab Congratulations, Mayor! MISSION CHECKLIST▼ Ye‟ve completed the Owl Investigation and earned a thoosand points feryerself! „An on top o‟ that, you‟ve also won five hundred more points for completing the challenge activity! I knew ye could do it! Now, you shouldnae forget what ye‟ve learned because ye‟ll surely need it for the next lesson on Food Chains. Ah must be off to the jungles of Africa, but mah good friends Diana Torres and Dr. Marcel Garcia are excellent field biologists. Ye‟ll have tae meet them at the Natural History Museum, and then they‟ll take ye out intae the wilderness! Och, I almost forgot! As another reward for ECOPOINTS: 18,500 yerharrd work, the citizens of San Diego have given ye this liddle beauty! It‟s a solar-powered personal helicopter. Go „head and give it a whirl! ~Mungo
  • Thank You! MISSION CHECKLIST▼ Dear Mayor, Thanks for doing all you can to learn about our beloved owls of San Diego! We just know that when the time comes, you‟ll be ready to make the best decisions for us and our precious wildlife. Good luck on your next mission! Your adoring, Citizens ECOPOINTS: 18,500Now you’ll have to fly your new ride from your downtownoffice to the Museum of Natural History in Balboa Park foryour next mission!
  • The next set of imageswould simulate thehelicopter flight fromdowntown San Diego toBalboa Park.
  • Urban Food Chains
  • By the end of this lesson you should be able to: 1. Identify the main habitats in San Diego. 2. Identify urban, riparian and chaparral creatures from San Diego. 3. Create a simple food chain. 4. Predict what will happen when a creature is removed from a food chain.Back
  • DirectionsTo complete this lesson: 1. Use your notebook to take notes. 2. Click to learn about each local organism. Click Dr. Marcel Garcia will on hotspots to learn more. 3. Review energy flow in aHe is take it from here. food chain and make sure you know each organism’s role in the food very knowledgeable chain. 4. aboutto learnDiego ecology. Click San vocabulary words you don’t know. 5. Review previous lessons if you need to. These cover some of the material we will go over here: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.11Back
  • First we‟ll Dr. Marcel Garcia.here Hi! I‟m look around right I work in our city,the Museum of Natural here at then we‟ll go to the San Diego I‟m goingexplore you to History. River to to take riparian habitats. Finally, we‟ll a couple of spots here in San explore Rose canyon here in about Diego where we can learn San Diego covered in chaparral food chains. habitat.Back
  • Let‟s look at some San Diego HabitatsChaparral /Sage scrub- The plantsand animals you see around thecanyons here in San Diego.Riparian- Areas surrounding thecreeks and rivershere in San Diego. Think: waterCity/Urban-Areas that are dominated byhumans. San Diego is special because ofthe canyons. Even urban areas havenative wildlife!Back
  • Now it‟s your turn Drag habitat type to its picture. Urban Riparian ChaparralBack
  • Now it‟s your turn Drag habitat type to its picture. Urban Good Job! You know your San Diego Riparian habitats! ChaparralBack
  • Native vs. Non-native You will need to know what native and non-native species are. NativeNon-Native species can in andbig effects on Diego. Species-Naturally lives have evolved in San Wasn‟tecosystems. They take space, use brought in by humans. resources and/or pollute environments to the point that native species can‟t live there Non-Native-Does not naturally live in San anymore. Diego. Was brought in by humans.Back
  • Urban Ecosystems Let‟s go to Paradise Hills here in San Diego to look at some of the plants and animals that live in the urban environment! Look at each plant and animal on your own.Back
  • Welcome to Paradise!Back
  • American Crow The American Crow is found throughout San Diego. • Native Species • Extremely intelligent • Gets energy from plants, scavenges, and hunts small mammals and insects • Can remember where food is and strategically hunt • Very social birds (and loud!)Back
  • Black Mustard Black Mustard is found throughout San Diego County. • Non-Native Species • Rapidly spreads, chokes out native plants • Mustard seeds were used to make mustard • Has become an important base of many food chainsBack
  • House Mouse There are many species of mice in San Diego. Many are native, but the most common in homes is the House Mouse. House mice are found throughout San Diego County in populated areas and in homes. • Non-Native Species • Gets energy from human trash, plants and hunts insects and spiders • Natural enemy of the Black Widow! • Click here to see all the species of mice here in San DiegoBack
  • Species of mice foundin San Diego.List provided by SanDiego Natural HistoryMuseum.Note: This does notinclude Pocket Mice (17more species!)Back
  • Coyote Coyotes are amazingly adaptable animals. Found throughout San Diego, they have found ways to co- exist well with humans. • Native Species • Gets energy from hunting individually, or in pairs • Favorite food sources are rabbit, snakes, other small reptiles and rodents • Intelligent, social mammalsBack
  • California Sunflower California sunflower is a lovely plant which grows throughout San Diego County. • Native Species • Part of the chaparral community • Flowers once yearly • Seeds eaten by many rodents in the ecosystem • Leaves eaten by insectsBack
  • Brush Rabbit The California Brush Rabbit is abundant in San Diego county. • Native Species • Gets energy from plants in the chaparral • One to seven young are born per litter, reproduces fast! • The brush rabbit is a type of cottontail rabbitBack
  • California Buckwheat California buckwheat is found throughout San Diego and is found in canyons as well as in urban areas • Native Species • Native Americans used as a grain • Blooms once yearly • Tolerates extremely low water conditions • Seeds and and flowers support a wide variety of animalsBack
  • Grasshopper Grasshoppers are common in San Diego • Native Species • Many species of grasshoppers • Eat green parts of plants • Can become problematic when populations increase • Can be a food source for lizards, spiders, snakes, mice, birds and other animalsBack
  • Black Widow The Black Widow spider is a common arachnid which lives throughout San Diego, often in people‟s yards and garages. • Native Species • Preys on insects • Most venomous spider in North America, but deaths are rare • Injects very little venom • Very shy animals • Spin webs that lack shape and form. Webs look erratic in appearance.Back
  • Hummingbird Hummingbirds are very common in San Diego • Native Species • Coexist well with humans • 12 species in San Diego • . Feeds on nectar from flowers • Preys on insects and spiders as well • Can hover in mid-air by rapidly flapping their wings up to 90 times per secondBack
  • Cockroaches Cockroaches are common throughout San Diego county in inhabited areas. They are not often found without humans. • Non-Native Species • Eat human trash, food droppings, pantry foods • Coexist with humans • 3 species are most common • American, Oriental, German • German cockroaches are most common in homes in San Diego. • Click here to see each type of roachBack
  • Back
  • Show How Energy Flows in a Food Chain Drag and drop your energy sources to the correct position. Click here to review food chains. Good Job, you showed how energy flows in the food chain!Back
  • Show How Energy Flows in a Food Chain Drag and drop your energy sources to the correct position. Click here to review food chains. Ooops! Remember what you learned about how energy flows in a food chain! Try againBack
  • What would happen if you removed one link from the chain? The black widow populationthe coyote. due to mouse WithThe spiders gonegrasshopper population the uncontrolledpopulation explodes TheLet‟s remove grasshopper population mouse the decreases because there are no coyotes. devastates the plants. overpopulation. expands.Back
  • Now it‟s your turn. What will happen when you remove the mouse?  A. The black widow population will go down.  B. The coyote population will go up. ✔  C. The grasshopper population will go down. That‟s right! With the  D. The sunflower population will go up. mice gone, the spider population will grow and the grasshoppers will decrease!Back
  • Click on the Chapparal/Sage scrub organism Sage Broom bacchus Owl Coyote Mouse Ground squirrel California Sagebrush Cooper‟s HawkBack
  • Click on the Riparian organism Cottonwood Tree Mulefat Raven Coyote Mule deer Bee fly Willow Benthic insects DragonflyBack
  • Vocabulary Food chain Arachnid Urban Coexist Riparian Exotic species Chaparral Habitats Native species Inhabited Non-native speciesBack