Lenten Lamentations (Gorzkie Zale) English translation

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English translation of traditional Polish Lenten devotion - Gorzkie Zale (Lenten Lamentations) based on 1986 Polish American Liturgical Center, Orcahard Lake, Michigan, USA publication. Additional …

English translation of traditional Polish Lenten devotion - Gorzkie Zale (Lenten Lamentations) based on 1986 Polish American Liturgical Center, Orcahard Lake, Michigan, USA publication. Additional brief history of the devotion at the end of the presentation.

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  • Thank you for english translation of this beautiful song! My dad plays it every Lent in our church . I love listen and sing it :)
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Transcript

  • 1. LENTENLAMENTATIONS “Gorzkie Zale” (English text)
  • 2. GORZKIE ŻALE ENGLISH TRANSLATION by S.M. Consuela, CSSF S.M. Lucentia, CSSF melody revised by S.M. Evangeline, CSSF© 1986 by SS.Ciril and Methodius Seminary, St. Mary’s College and St. Mary’s Preparatory, Orchard Lake, Michigan
  • 3. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS
  • 4. PART ONEFIRST & FOURTH SUNDAY OF LENT
  • 5. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 1
  • 6. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 1
  • 7. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 1
  • 8. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 1
  • 9. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 1
  • 10. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 1
  • 11. PART TWOSECOND & FIFTH SUNDAY OF LENT
  • 12. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 2
  • 13. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 2
  • 14. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 2
  • 15. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 2
  • 16. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 2
  • 17. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 2
  • 18. PARTTHREETHIRD SUNDAY OF LENT &PALM SUNDAY
  • 19. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 3
  • 20. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 3
  • 21. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 3
  • 22. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 3
  • 23. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 3
  • 24. LENTEN LAMENTATIONS - 3
  • 25. about Gorzkie Zale“GORZKIE ŻALE” (Bitter or Lenten Lamentations) is traditional Polish devotion during the Lent. It originates in early 18th century in the Holy CrossChurch in Warsaw, Poland. Primarily it was a collection of popular songs and melodies used by people in villages around Warsaw to reflect onPassion of Christ. In 1707 Fr. Lawrence Benik CM published in print a booklet titled in Polish “Snopek Myrry z Ogroda Gethsemańskiego albożałosne Gorzkiey Męki Syna Bożego [...] rospamiętywanie” (A bunch of Myrrh from Garden of Gethsemane or sorrowful crying over Bitter Passion ofSon of God). Myrrh was one of the gifts the Three Wise Men brought to newborn Jesus as he announcement of the passion and the redemptivedeath of Christ. This publishing is considered as beginning of Gorzkie Zale devotion. For years this baroque multi-word phrase was used as title ofthe devotion. Then, with passing time, a title derived from first words of the initial song (Gorzkie Żale przybywajcie, serca nasze przenikajcie) wasused more and more frequent. However the original old-Polish language is preserved until now.Fr. Bartholomew Tarlo CM, pastor of Holy Cross Parish and first Visitor of Province of Poland acknowledged importance of this devotionalmelodies on Passion of Christ. He ordered to rearrange the songs into structured liturgical order. The confreres used the structure of baroque Liturgyof Hours as pattern. They based the devotion on morning hour of Breviary prayers, then called Matutinum (nowadays it might be similar to Office ofReadings) and Laudes prayer (present Lauds). Fr. Benik looked at old gregorian chorales to arrange music, but he kept original folklore character ofmelodies. Specialists can find similarities to gregorian hymnals and chorales.Author, Fr. Lawrence Benik CM described how the devotion should be celebrated. Since the beginning it took place on Sundays of the Lent aftereither High Mass or Vespers. In late 18th century some liturgical elements were added making the structure very much like the present one:presentation of the Holy Sacrament at the beginning; next, three parts of the hymnals and songs were sang; following was occasional sermon calledPassion Sermon. Next, there was procession with candles around the church. Finally the celebrant blessed worshippers with the Holy Sacrament.The devotion of Gorzkie Zale spread around territory of Kingdom of Poland and Lithuania very fast. Wherever Vincentian missioners went andpreached recollections and popular missions they brought Gorzkie Zale with them and planted the devotion in all these places. Soon, Gorzkie Zalebecame the central and most traditional Lenten celebration in Polish churches.During three centuries of its history some changes in the melody line were introduced. There were also some attempts to translate the text intoother languages, e.g. English. But after 300 years Gorzkie Zale remained typical, traditional Polish Lenten devotion piously celebrated in Poland andin most Polish communities abroad. In 2007 there were numerous events in Vincentian locations in Poland, especially in Holy Cross Church inWarsaw, commemorating 300 years of this Lenten devotion.Modern Gorzkie Zale is not as rich in structure as the original version. It starts with Presentation of the Holy Sacrament. Wake-up (Pobudka) songfollows. Next, one part (three melodies like psalms in the Lauds) is performed (the same part in every third Sunday of Lent). Passion sermon ispreached next. The celebration is concludes with the blessing with Holy Sacrament. In some parishes, all three parts of Gorzkie Zale are sang as onecelebration on Good Friday.
  • 26. Text scanned from LENTEN LAMENTATIONS by © Polish-American Liturgical Center, Orchard Lake, Michigan, 1986 Additional text, graphic design and layout Thomas Zielinski © 2011 for this presentation: Congregation of the Mission, Province of New England; http://cmnewengland.org