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Usp2003 ud sfsu Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Developmentof aSustainableUniversal DesignMethodologyProfessor Ricardo GomesDepartment of Design and Industry
  • 2. Universal Design Establishing and Inclusive Agenda:Designing for a Wider Range of Users and ApplicationsThe design of products and environmentsto be usable by all peopleto the greatest extent possible,without adaptation or specialized designRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 3. Universal Design Establishing and Inclusive Agenda:Designing for a Wider Range of Users and Applications2 Key Goals:> Broaden students awareness of Product Design that developsan inherent appreciation & value of how Universal Design principlescan enhance a competitive Product Development methodology> Establish a foundation in a Product Development scheme in whicha student can identify a viable market need, or desire that can becomprehensive & inclusive in satisfying the student’s inspirationRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 4. PROPOSA L FORORG ANIZING A ND ED UCATIONI NITIATIVE ONUNIVERS AL DES IGNI N LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEANProject Background and JustificationThe policy basis for the Organizing and Educ ation Initiative is theWorld Programme of Action concerning Disabled Pe rsons, w hichaddresses accessibility issues in its Ōequalization of opportunitiesÕobjective. The objective focuses on mean s by w hich generalsystems of society are made Ōaccessible to all.Õ
  • 5. The Initiative focuseson Latin America and the CaribbeanThe Organizing and Education Initiative will be convened byCVI-Rio Š Centro de Vida Independente do Rio de Janeiro incollaboration with a Brazilian Host Co mmittee and in cooperationwith the US-based educational non-governmen tal organization,Adaptive Environments. Adaptive Environments is the primarySponsor of Designing for the 21stCentury III, An InternationalConference on Universal Design. That event is scheduled forDecember 8 though 12, 2004 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is thefirst time that the entire conference w ill focus on building bridgesof dialogue, information sharing and collaboration betweendeveloping and developed economies.
  • 6. Universal Design:QuickTime™ and aPhoto - JPEG decompressorare needed to see this picture.Principle 1: Equitable UseGuidelines1a. Provide the same means of use for all users: identical whenever possible;equivalent when not.1b. Avoid segregating or stigmatizing any users.1c. Provisions for privacy, security, and safety should be equally available to allusers.1d. Make the design appealing to all users.Examples * Power doors with sensors at entrances that are convenient for all users* Integrated, dispersed, and adaptable seating in assembly areas such assports arenas and theaters1
  • 7. Universal Design:QuickTime™ and aPhoto - JPEG decompressorare needed to see this picture.2Principle 2: Flexibility in UseGuidelines2a. Provide choice in methods of use.2b. Accommodate right- or left-handed access and use.2c. Facilitate the users accuracy and precision.2d. Provide adaptability to the users pace.Examples* Scissors designed for right- or left-handed users* An automated teller machine (ATM) that has visual, tactile,and audible feedback, a tapered card opening, and a palm rest
  • 8. Universal Design:Principle 3: Simple and Intuitive UseGuidelines3a. Eliminate unnecessary complexity.3b. Be consistent with user expectations and intuition.3c. Accommodate a wide range of literacy and language skills.3d. Arrange information consistent with its importance.3e. Provide effective prompting and feedback during and aftertask completion.Examples* An instruction manual with drawings and no text* A moving sidewalk or escalator in a public space3
  • 9. Universal Design:QuickTime™ and aPhoto - JPEG decompressorare needed to see this picture.Principle 4: Perceptible InformationGuidelines4a. Use different modes (pictorial, verbal, tactile) for redundantpresentation of essential information.4b. Provide adequate contrast between essential information and itssurroundings.4c. Maximize "legibility" of essential information.4d. Differentiate elements in ways that can be described (i.e., make iteasy to give instructions or directions).4e. Provide compatibility with a variety of techniques or devices usedby people with sensory limitations.Examples* Tactile, visual, and audible cues and instructions on a thermostat* Redundant cueing (e.g., voice communications and signage) inairports, train stations, and subway cars4
  • 10. Universal Design:QuickTime™ and aPhoto - JPEG decompressorare needed to see this picture.5Principle 5: Tolerance for ErrorGuidelines5a. Arrange elements to minimize hazards and errors: most usedelements, most accessible; hazardous elements eliminated, isolated,or shielded.5b. Provide warnings of hazards and errors.5c. Provide fail-safe features.5d. Discourage unconscious action in tasks that require vigilance.Examples*An "undo" feature in computer software that allows the user to correct mistakeswithout penalty* A double-cut car key easily inserted into a recessed keyhole in either of two ways
  • 11. Universal Design:6Principle 6: Low Physical EffortGuidelines6a. Allow user to maintain a neutral body position.6b. Use reasonable operating forces.6c. Minimize repetitive actions.6d. Minimize sustained physical effortExamples* Lever or loop handles on doors and faucets* Touch lamps operated without a switch
  • 12. Universal Design:7Principle 7: Size and Space for Approach & UseGuidelines7a. Provide a clear line of sight to important elements for any seated orstanding user.7b. Make reach to all components comfortable for any seated orstanding user.7c. Accommodate variations in hand and grip size.7d. Provide adequate space for the use of assistive devices orExamples* Wide gates at subway stations that accommodate all users* Controls on the front and clear floor space around appliances,mailboxes, garbage dumpsters, and other building elements
  • 13. Universal Design “Seamless” MarketingRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 14. Universal Design “Seamless” MarketingRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityBrian Donnelly
  • 15. Universal Design “Seamless” MarketingRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 16. Universal Design “Seamless” MarketingRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 17. Universal Design…
  • 18. Universal Design…… “NOT!”
  • 19. Universal Design
  • 20. Universal Design
  • 21. Universal Design
  • 22. Universal Design
  • 23. Universal Design:
  • 24. Universal Design:
  • 25. Universal Design:
  • 26. Universal Design Japan
  • 27. Universal Design JapanRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 28. Universal Design JapanRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 29. Universal Design Outdoor EnvironmentsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 30. Universal Design Outdoor EnvironmentsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityPhil Evans, Director of Campus Buildings & Grounds, SFSU
  • 31. Universal Design Outdoor EnvironmentsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 32. Universal BenchDAI 300RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 33. Universal Design Outdoor Environments
  • 34. Universal Design Outdoor Environments
  • 35. Universal Design Outdoor Environments
  • 36. Universal Design Outdoor Environments
  • 37. Universal Design Outdoor Environments
  • 38. Universal Design Outdoor Environments
  • 39. Universal Design Outdoor Environments
  • 40. Universal Design Outdoor EnvironmentsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityTish Brown, ADA CoordinatorLegion of Honor Museum, San FranciscoSITE OBSERVATIONS
  • 41. Universal Design Outdoor/Public EnvironmentsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 42. Universal Design Outdoor/Public EnvironmentsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 43. Universal Design Outdoor/Public EnvironmentsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 44. What is Urban Upgrading?Upgrading - or slum improvement as it is also called - inlow income urban communities is many things, but at itssimplest it has come to mean a package of basic services:access, clean water supply and adequate sewage disposalto improve the well-being of the community.Universal Design Urban UpgradingRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 45. Universal Design Urban UpgradingFundamentally it is legalizing and ‘regularizing’ urbanenvironmental properties in situations of insecure orunclear tenure.San Salvador, El Salvador. Streets and drainageare a part of a basic package.Tondo Project, Philippines. Pride of place!RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 46. Universal Design Urban UpgradingIt is a “Universal” approach to the overall andsustainable improvement of the environment for all.Upgrading customarily provides a package ofimprovements in streets, footpaths and drainage aswell.RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 47. Universal Design Urban UpgradingThe physical improvement is only the beginning:Facilities programming are offered to increase incomeearning opportunities and the general economic health ofa community. Upgrading is the start to becoming arecognized citizen.RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 48. What is needed to make Upgrading work?The most important element for success is commitmentby all: the city, the community, and the families. A senseof partnership must be developed among them.Secondly upgrading must meet a real need -people must want it and understand the value.RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 49. What is needed to make Upgrading work?Implementation will require getting the institutionalarrangements right:> give incentives for agencies to work with the poor,> keep everyone informed and coordinate betweenstakeholders> define clearly the roles of the various agencies.> keep upgrading going, sustainability concerns mustbe a priority in financing, institutions, and regulations.RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 50. What are the benefits of Upgrading?The benefits are simply that people obtain an improved,healthy and secure living environment without being displaced.Recognizing title and security of tenure makes a positivecontribution to both the economic prospects of the poor, as wellas to the national economy.Experience has shown that urban upgrading projects areassociated with social and economic benefits that areparticularly high.RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 51. Universal Design Family Health & WelfareRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 52. Universal Design in Small-Scale BusinessesRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 53. Universal Design Small-Scale BusinessesRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 54. UD thru Family Health & WelfareUniversal Design Family Health & WelfareRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 55. Universal Design Whirlwind Wheelchair InternationalRalph Hotchkiss
  • 56. Universal Design Whirlwind Wheelchair International
  • 57. Universal Design Whirlwind Wheelchair International
  • 58. Universal Design Whirlwind Wheelchair International
  • 59. Whirlwind Wheelchair International:ZambiaRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 60. Whirlwind Wheelchair International:ZambiaRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 61. Whirlwind Wheelchair International:ZambiaRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 62. • Symposium• Focus Group• Workshop• PresentationUniversal Design at San Francisco State UniversityRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 63. Lecture and demonstrationmaterials3 Primary Components For ImplementingUniversal Design Curriculum Are As Follows:Professional review andcritiqueResearch/workshops andfocus group sessions
  • 64. Universal Design Assessment ParadigmDr. James Bebee
  • 65. Universal Design Assessment Paradigm
  • 66. Universal Design Assessment Paradigm
  • 67. Universal Design Assessment Paradigm
  • 68. Lecture and demonstrationmaterials3 Primary Components For ImplementingUniversal Design Curriculum Are As Follows:Professional review andcritiqueResearch/workshops andfocus group sessionsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 69. • Symposium• Focus Group• Workshop• PresentationUniversal Design Research/Focus GroupRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 70. Institute on Aging: On-Lok Senior Health CenterUniversal Design Research/Focus GroupRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 71. • Symposium• Focus Group• Workshop• PresentationUniversal Design Workshop San Francisco State University
  • 72. Lecture and demonstrationmaterials3 Primary Components For ImplementingUniversal Design Curriculum Are As Follows:Professional review andcritiqueResearch/workshops andfocus group sessions
  • 73. Universal Design Whirlwind Wheelchair International
  • 74. Universal Design Whirlwind Wheelchair InternationalRalph Hotchkiss
  • 75. Ralph HotchkissUniversal Design Whirlwind Wheelchair International
  • 76. RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityChart Concept: Centro de Estudios de Diseno Universal, Estudio S+F, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • 77. RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityUniversal Design at San Francisco State UniversityTTTHHHEEEMMMAAATTTIIICCC AAARRREEEAAASSSDesign Area Design Methodology relative to Product, People & Process(Functional to Transgenerational Design) Design Collaboratives in the Product Development Process Orientation to Universal Design Principles & Methodology Domestic/Personal Environment: Housewares – “Hand-held”Utensils & Appliances Existing Product Profile , Analysis & Comparative Research Target Market Environment, Approach and Analysis User Profile/Character Analysis/Mood Board User-Centered Design Interface(observation, focus groups) Life-Cycle Assessment/Sustainability Product Development Management
  • 78. TTTHHHEEEMMMAAATTTIIICCC AAARRREEEAAASSSHealth Area Gerontology, Aging & the “Baby Boomers” Re-Definition of Old Age Mature Marketplace Dependence and self-sufficiency Stereotypes and Assumptions Parameters and CriteriaRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityUniversal Design at San Francisco State UniversityBridgePoint Retirement Community
  • 79. TTTHHHEEEMMMAAATTTIIICCC AAARRREEEAAASSSSocial Area Optimizing Independent Living and Lifestyles Growth & Flexibility in the Domestic Environment Universal Design as a Social Phenomena Linking Inter-Generational BenefitsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityUniversal Design at San Francisco State UniversityGene Chelberg, Disability Resource Center, SFSUBridgePoint Retirement Community
  • 80. TTTHHHEEEMMMAAATTTIIICCC AAARRREEEAAASSSLegal Area Dismantling Discrimination by Design Social Policies and the Quality of Life The Overall Benefits of Disability Rights, Regulations & Policies for AllRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityUniversal Design at San Francisco State UniversityDr. Paul Longmore, Institute on Disability, SFSU
  • 81. TTTHHHEEEMMMAAATTTIIICCC AAARRREEEAAASSSEconomics Area Inclusive Target Market Benefits Marketing the Affordable and Feasible Benefits of U niversal Design Quantifying the Value-Added Appeal, Desire & Usability of Universal Design Optimizing Product Development & Management in the Life-Cycle Design factorsRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityUniversal Design at San Francisco State UniversityProf. Josiah Kahane, Design Dept, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Israel
  • 82. 11METHODOLOGYPHASE IDISCOVERY UNDERSTANDING Takes you out of your comfort zoneSTAKEHOLDERS “Go There !”1.1 Orientation to UD Principles & Methodology1.2 Existing Product Review, Profile & Analysis1.3 Comparative Market Research ReviewINTERVIEWS OBSERVING User-Centered Research & InteractionFOCUS GROUPS “Be There !” (Participation/Engage/Document)ARTIFACT REVIEWS 2.1 User Profile & ObservationsEXISTING MARKET 2.2 Site Observations2.3 InterviewsPRODUCT ANALYSIS INTERPRETING Translating Research Data“Be Vuln e ra b le! ” (You are not the expert)3.1 Development of Basis of Interest/Project Proposal3.2 Inspiration/Theme/Branding Strategy3.3 Development of Character/User Profile analysis and character boardEXPLORATION VISUALIZING/REALIZING Concepts & Solutions“Be Surpri s e d !” (Keep track of what is surprising you)4.1 Visual Brainstorming/Initial Design Sketches4.2 Preliminary Design Guide/Conceptual Fra mework4.3 Life-Cycle Assessment & Material ConsiderationsUSER TESTING EVALUATING/REFINING Test & Refine Ideas & Solutions“Be Ho ne s t & Bra ve !”5.1 Simulations5.2 Usability Testing5.3 Activity GroupsTANGIBLE SOLUTION IMPLEMENTING Final Product Resolution relative to UD“Be Re a d y !”6.1 Universal Design Product Evaluation(CUD)6.2 Product Development & Management Review6.3 Marketing Plan ImplementationMETHODOLOGYPHASE IPHASE IIMARKETING OPPORTUNITIES134526RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 83. DISCOVERY UNDERSTANDING Takes you out of your comfort zoneSTAKEHOLDERS “Go There !”1.1 Orientation to UD Principles & Methodology1.2 Existing Product Review, Profile & Analysis1.3 Literature Reviews1.4 Comparative Market Research Review1.5 Content Analysis1.6 Simulation Analysis1.7 Initial Interviews, Focus Groups & Workshops1RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityBridgePoint Retirement Community
  • 84. INTERVIEWS OBSERVING User-Centered Research & InteractionFOCUS GROUPS “Be There !” (Participation/Engage/Document)ARTIFACT REVIEWSEXISTING MARKET2.1 User Profile2.2 Site Observations2.3 User Observations2.4 Media Documentation2.5 Interviews2.6 Shadowing2RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 85. PRODUCT ANALYSIS INTERPRETING Translating Research Data“Be Vuln e ra b le! ” (You are not the expert)3.1 Development of Basis of Interest/Project Proposal3.2 Comparative Design Research and Examples3.3 Inspiration/Theme/Branding Strategy3.4 Development of Character/User Profile analysis and character board3.5 Key Selling Points, Features and Specifications3RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityUniversalDesignatSanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 86. EXPLORATION VISUALIZING/REALIZING Concepts & Solutions“Be Surpri s e d !” (Keep track of what is surprising you)4.1 Visual Brainstorming/Initial Design Sketches4.2 Preliminary Design Guide/Conceptual Fra mework4.3 Life-Cycle Assessment & Material Considerations4.4 Development of Concept Sketches, Design Direction and Exploration4.5 User Participation4Susan Goltsman, Moore, Iacafano & Goltsman, Berkeley, CAUniversalDesignatSanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 87. USER TESTING EVALUATING/REFINING Test & Refine Ideas & Solutions“Be Ho ne s t & Bra ve !”5.1 Simulations5.2 Usability Testing5.3 Activity Groups5.4 Environmental Testing5BridgePoint Retirement CommunityUniversalDesignatSanFranciscoStateUniversityIRicardoGomes
  • 88. TANGIBLE SOLUTION IMPLEMENTING Final Product Resolution relative to UD“Be Re a d y !”6.1 Universal Design Product Evaluation(CUD)6.2 Product Development & Management Review6.3 Marketing Plan Implementation6Universal Design at San Francisco State University
  • 89. Universal Design Pre-Tollgate I: Concept & Basis of InterestScreens & Selects Projects for DevelopmentIdentify/Document:• Product Idea• User Need• Competitive Marketing Information• Potential Benefits
  • 90. Universal Design Tollgate I - Preliminary Product DesignDevelop Design Guide, Marketing Plan & Design ConceptsDocuments:• Product Description• Competitive Analysis• Features/Specifications• Design Constraints• Key Selling Points• Marketing Plan Outline• Target Costs & Estimated Volume• Initial Concept Sketches & Form Studies• User-interaction/Critique
  • 91. Universal Design Tollgate II - Design ApprovalFinalize Design Guide & Develop Product Design ApproachDocuments:• User-Centered Design Interface/Workshops• Focus Group Sessions/Product Review• Establish Design Approach/Documents• Update Design Guide• Life-Cycle Assessment/Mfg. Feasibility
  • 92. Universal Design Tollgate III - Product DevelopmentDesign “Freeze” & ImplementationDocuments:• Working & Appearance Model• Design Review• Focus Group Sessions: User Testing• Final Design Guide• Prototype & Production Plan
  • 93. Universal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed UseJohnny Venida
  • 94. Johnny VenidaUniversal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed Use
  • 95. Johnny VenidaUniversal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed Use
  • 96. Johnny VenidaUniversal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed Use
  • 97. Johnny VenidaUniversal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed Use
  • 98. Johnny VenidaUniversal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed Use
  • 99. Johnny VenidaUniversal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed Use
  • 100. Universal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed UseJohnny Venida
  • 101. Universal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed UseJohnny Venida
  • 102. Johnny VenidaUniversal Design Stationary Roller Peeler: For Manual One-Handed UseFocus Group Product Review
  • 103. • Symposium• Focus Group• Workshop• PresentationUniversal Design Studio Focus GroupRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity
  • 104. Universal Design Mobile Hot Food ContainerAvrind Gupta
  • 105. Universal Design Faucet Friend Water Temperature IndicatorRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityCharles FloydCharles Floyd
  • 106. Universal Design Lotus Laundry Sorter: Stationary/Transport BagRicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversityTuyet Tran
  • 107. Ricardo GomesChair/Associate ProfessorSan Francisco State UniversityDesign Center for Global Needsricgomes@sfsu.edu(415) 338-2229RicardoGomesISanFranciscoStateUniversity