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Final pres
 

Final pres

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    Final pres Final pres Presentation Transcript

    • Rhett Bradbury Summer 2012 Prof. Tom Klinkowstein
    • This thesis presents the hypothesis that the use of wiki system, when applied to the day-to-day administration of the civic needs of an urban neighborhood, will produce a measurable improvement in the knowledge and involvement in civic matters by the residents of said neighborhood. In contrast, the current method of soliciting engagement from constituents through traditional media allows for a limited, one-way discussion between residents and their representatives. Such a hypothesis will lead to granular responses to constituents needs, with benefits to include global consideration for local issues, unambiguous policy deliberation, and lateral representation of citizens.Rhett Bradbury Summer 2012 Prof. Tom Klinkowstein Pratt Institute Grad ComD
    • Sections: 1. Brief Historical Clarifications 2. Implications of Technology (vis-a-vis Civic Management)Rhett Bradbury Summer 2012 Prof. Tom Klinkowstein Pratt Institute Grad ComD
    • a. How has government come to be? 1. “The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality” by Graham Burchell, Colin Gordon and Peter Miller b. What is to be a citizen? 1.“The Good Citizen: A History of American Civic Life” by Michael Schudson A. Overview of the US Citizen 1. “Men and Citizen’s: A Study of Rousseau’s Social Theory” by Judith N. Shklar c. What is Democracy? 1. “Democracy: A Very Short Introduction” by Bernard Crick 2. “ Democracy” by Charles TillyRhett Bradbury Summer 2012 Prof. Tom Klinkowstein Pratt Institute Grad ComD
    • a. The Internet & Democracy 1. “Web 2.0: New Challenges for the Study of E-Democracy” by Andrew Chadwick 2. “Deliberative Democracy: The Public Sphere and the Internet” by Antje Grimmier b. The Internet & Social Organization 1. Dave Parry, Assoc. Prof. of Emerging Tech., U of Texas (Dallas) profoundheterogeity.com 2. “Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations” by Clay ShirkyRhett Bradbury Summer 2012 Prof. Tom Klinkowstein Pratt Institute Grad ComD
    • c. Social Production 1. “The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom” by Yochai Benkler 2. “Cognitive Surplus: How Technology Makes Consumers” by Clay Shirky d. Open Source Economics 1. “The Penguin and the Leviathan: How Cooperation Triumphs Over Self-Interest” by Yochai Benkler e. Sustaining Civic Participation 1. “Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World” by Jane McGonigalRhett Bradbury Summer 2012 Prof. Tom Klinkowstein Pratt Institute Grad ComD
    • f. Wiki Systems 1. “Mediawiki: Wikipedia and Beyond” by Daniel J. Barrett 2. “Wikis: Tools for Information Work and Collaboration” by Jane E. Klobas 3. “WikiLeaks and the Age of Transparency” by Micah L. SifryRhett Bradbury Summer 2012 Prof. Tom Klinkowstein Pratt Institute Grad ComD
    • Rhett Bradbury Summer 2012 Prof. Tom Klinkowstein Pratt Institute Grad ComD