Accounting Concepts for Contractors
Workshop Objectives <ul><li>To set up a new company file </li></ul><ul><li>To understand your chart of accounts </li></ul>...
Home Screen
Setting up a new company file
Exercise 1-1 Entering your company information
Exercise 1-1 Select your industry
Exercise 1-1 Select your business structure
Exercise 1-1 Select the first month of your fiscal year
Exercise 1-1 Set up your administrator password
Exercise 1-1 Name and save your company file
Exercise 1-1 Customizing QuickBooks for your business
Exercise 1-1 What do you sell?
Exercise 1-1 Do you charge sales tax?
Exercise 1-1 Do you want to create estimates in QuickBooks?
Exercise 1-1 Using sales receipts in QuickBooks?
Exercise 1-1 Using statements in QuickBooks?
Exercise 1-1 Using progress invoicing
Exercise 1-1 Managing bills you owe
Exercise 1-1 Do you print checks?
Exercise 1-1 Do you accept credit cards?
Exercise 1-1 Tracking time in QuickBooks
Exercise 1-1 Do you have employees?
Exercise 1-1 Using accounts in QuickBooks?
Exercise 1-1 Select a date to start tracking your finances
Exercise 1-1 Add your bank account
Exercise 1-1 Enter your bank account information
Exercise 1-1 Enter your bank account information
Exercise 1-1 Review bank accounts
Exercise 1-1 Review income and expense accounts
 
 
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity  4000 - 4999 Income or ...
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity  4000 - 4999 Income or ...
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity  4000 - 4999 Income or ...
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity   4000 - 4999 Income or...
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity  4000 - 4999 Income or ...
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity  4000 - 4999 Income or ...
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity  4000 - 4999 Income or ...
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity  4000 - 4999 Income or ...
Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity  4000 - 4999 Income or ...
Understanding Financial Statements <ul><li>Two of the most important reports for measuring the profitability of your busin...
<ul><li>A balance sheet is a financial snapshot of your company on one date.  It shows: </li></ul><ul><li>What you have (a...
A profit and loss statement, also called an income statement, shows your income, expenses, and net profit or loss (equal t...
Setting up your items
Setting up items if you generate estimates in QuickBooks   01 PLANS & PERMITS   01.1 Plans 01.2 Building Permits 01.3 City...
Exercise 1-2 Creating items for job phases
Exercise 1-3 Grouping related items
Setting up your customers and jobs
Setting up your vendors and subcontractors
Setting up and using class tracking
Exercise 1-4 Setting up class tracking
Estimates and Invoices
Here is an outline of the estimating and invoicing process in QuickBooks <ul><li>Create the estimate.   </li></ul><ul><li>...
Creating estimates   <ul><li>Follow these guidelines to plan and create estimates:  </li></ul><ul><li>Determine your estim...
Estimating Strategy   <ul><li>There are two basic strategies for handling your estimates:  </li></ul><ul><li>Create all yo...
Exercise 2-1   Turn on estimates and progress invoicing
Customizing the estimate form
Exercise 2-2   Customizing an estimate form
Exercise 2-3   Create an estimate
Creating an invoice
Common types of invoice methods include:  <ul><li>Set price  (usually a small and simple verbal contract)  </li></ul><ul><...
Creating a set price invoice
Exercise 2-4 Creating a set price invoice
Invoicing for cost plus or time and materials jobs
Creating a fixed price invoice
Exercise 2-5 Creating a new fixed fee billing item
Creating a progress invoice
Job Costing
To use job costing to its full advantage  <ul><li>Set up a Customer:Job for each of your jobs </li></ul><ul><li>Set up you...
Setting up your customers and jobs
Entering bills for job-related or overhead expenses <ul><li>Enter vendor bills for job or project-related costs as items <...
Exercise 3-1 Entering a bill for items
Using purchase orders to track committed costs or subcontractor bids
Exercise 3-2 Enter a subcontractor’s bill checked against the original bid
Entering credit card charges for project-related costs
Exercise 3-3 Entering credit card charges for project-related costs
Handling petty cash
Exercise 3-4 Handling petty cash
Understanding job cost reports
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Profitability Summary and Detail </li></ul><ul><li>Job Estimates vs. Actuals Summary and Deta...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Profitability Summary and Detail </li></ul><ul><li>These reports give you a snapshot of your ...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Estimates vs. Actuals Summary and Detail </li></ul>Use these reports to see how accurate your...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Costs by Vendor and Job </li></ul>Use these four reports to make sure you don't overpay vendo...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Cost to Complete by Job Summary and Detail </li></ul><ul><li>Use these reports to calculate the e...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Costs Detail </li></ul>This report lists each individual transaction for each job you have se...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Unpaid Bill by Job and Unpaid Job Bills by Vendor </li></ul>These reports show what you owe to ve...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Expenses Not Assigned to Jobs </li></ul>Use this report to help identify costs that you may have ...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Progress Invoices vs. Estimates </li></ul>For each customer or job, this report shows whether...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Item Profitability </li></ul>This report summarizes how much money your company has made or lost ...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Item Estimates vs. Actuals </li></ul>This report summarizes how accurately your company estimated...
Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Profit and Loss by Job </li></ul>This report shows how much you are making or losing on each job....
Specialty Contractors
Handling reimbursable expenses
Using service items and subitems to track service rates  <ul><li>For example, if you are an electrician and you charge you...
Handling product sales and inventory  If you sell products as well as services, you may want to use the inventory feature ...
Tracking noninventory materials used on a job Generally this would apply to painters, electricians, or landscape contracto...
Exercise 4-1 Tracking noninventory materials used on a job
Commercial Contractors
Paying Union Benefits
Exercise 4-2 To see hours worked for each employee on a union job
Certified Payroll Reports
Exercise 4-3 Creating a certified payroll report
Tracking the costs of spec houses or developments
Tracking costs of construction
Entering costs
Recording the sale of a spec home <ul><li>The selling price of the home  </li></ul><ul><li>The pay-off of the construction...
Overview of steps when you sell a spec home   This method uses four separate transactions and a &quot;dummy&quot; checking...
Exercise 4-4 Recording the sale of a spec home
The End!
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QuickBooks Contractors Edition

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This QuickBooks Contractor 2007 Edition is a curriculum designed for Contractors by Intuit.

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QuickBooks Contractors Edition

  1. 1. Accounting Concepts for Contractors
  2. 2. Workshop Objectives <ul><li>To set up a new company file </li></ul><ul><li>To understand your chart of accounts </li></ul><ul><li>To understand how to generate and read financial statements (Balance Sheet and Profit & Loss) </li></ul><ul><li>To practice creating estimates </li></ul><ul><li>To understand various methods for invoicing customers </li></ul><ul><li>To understand your job cost reports </li></ul>By the end of this training, you should be able:
  3. 3. Home Screen
  4. 4. Setting up a new company file
  5. 5. Exercise 1-1 Entering your company information
  6. 6. Exercise 1-1 Select your industry
  7. 7. Exercise 1-1 Select your business structure
  8. 8. Exercise 1-1 Select the first month of your fiscal year
  9. 9. Exercise 1-1 Set up your administrator password
  10. 10. Exercise 1-1 Name and save your company file
  11. 11. Exercise 1-1 Customizing QuickBooks for your business
  12. 12. Exercise 1-1 What do you sell?
  13. 13. Exercise 1-1 Do you charge sales tax?
  14. 14. Exercise 1-1 Do you want to create estimates in QuickBooks?
  15. 15. Exercise 1-1 Using sales receipts in QuickBooks?
  16. 16. Exercise 1-1 Using statements in QuickBooks?
  17. 17. Exercise 1-1 Using progress invoicing
  18. 18. Exercise 1-1 Managing bills you owe
  19. 19. Exercise 1-1 Do you print checks?
  20. 20. Exercise 1-1 Do you accept credit cards?
  21. 21. Exercise 1-1 Tracking time in QuickBooks
  22. 22. Exercise 1-1 Do you have employees?
  23. 23. Exercise 1-1 Using accounts in QuickBooks?
  24. 24. Exercise 1-1 Select a date to start tracking your finances
  25. 25. Exercise 1-1 Add your bank account
  26. 26. Exercise 1-1 Enter your bank account information
  27. 27. Exercise 1-1 Enter your bank account information
  28. 28. Exercise 1-1 Review bank accounts
  29. 29. Exercise 1-1 Review income and expense accounts
  30. 32. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  31. 33. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  32. 34. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  33. 35. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  34. 36. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  35. 37. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/ Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  36. 38. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  37. 39. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  38. 40. Understanding your chart of accounts 1000 - 1999 Assets 2000 - 2999 Liabilities 3000 - 3999 Equity 4000 - 4999 Income or Revenue 5000 - 5999 Job Costs/Cost of Goods Sold 6000 - 6999 Overhead Costs or Expenses 7000 - 7999 Other Income 8000 - 8999 Other Expense
  39. 41. Understanding Financial Statements <ul><li>Two of the most important reports for measuring the profitability of your business are the balance sheet and the profit and loss statement (also called an income statement) </li></ul>
  40. 42. <ul><li>A balance sheet is a financial snapshot of your company on one date. It shows: </li></ul><ul><li>What you have (assets) </li></ul><ul><li>What people owe you (accounts receivable) </li></ul><ul><li>What your business owes to other people (liabilities and accounts payable) </li></ul><ul><li>The net worth of your business (equity) </li></ul>The Balance Sheet
  41. 43. A profit and loss statement, also called an income statement, shows your income, expenses, and net profit or loss (equal to income minus expenses). The Profit and Loss Statement
  42. 44. Setting up your items
  43. 45. Setting up items if you generate estimates in QuickBooks 01 PLANS & PERMITS 01.1 Plans 01.2 Building Permits 01.3 City/County Licenses & Fees
  44. 46. Exercise 1-2 Creating items for job phases
  45. 47. Exercise 1-3 Grouping related items
  46. 48. Setting up your customers and jobs
  47. 49. Setting up your vendors and subcontractors
  48. 50. Setting up and using class tracking
  49. 51. Exercise 1-4 Setting up class tracking
  50. 52. Estimates and Invoices
  51. 53. Here is an outline of the estimating and invoicing process in QuickBooks <ul><li>Create the estimate. </li></ul><ul><li>If the customer needs adjustments to the bid, edit the estimate and present a final estimate including the change order to your customer. </li></ul><ul><li>If you require an upfront job deposit, record the deposit. </li></ul><ul><li>Enter bills for job costs. </li></ul><ul><li>Create an invoice. </li></ul><ul><li>If you get a bank draw, instead of receiving payment from the customer, create an invoice (even if you don't need to send one). </li></ul><ul><li>Receive payments and make deposits to your bank account. </li></ul>
  52. 54. Creating estimates <ul><li>Follow these guidelines to plan and create estimates: </li></ul><ul><li>Determine your estimating strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Turn on estimates and progress invoicing </li></ul><ul><li>Customize the estimate form </li></ul><ul><li>Include boilerplate text on an estimate </li></ul><ul><li>Create items for you estimate </li></ul><ul><li>Create an estimate </li></ul>
  53. 55. Estimating Strategy <ul><li>There are two basic strategies for handling your estimates: </li></ul><ul><li>Create all your estimates using QuickBooks. </li></ul><ul><li>Create detail estimates using a spreadsheet or another estimating program, and then bring a summary estimate into QuickBooks. </li></ul>
  54. 56. Exercise 2-1 Turn on estimates and progress invoicing
  55. 57. Customizing the estimate form
  56. 58. Exercise 2-2 Customizing an estimate form
  57. 59. Exercise 2-3 Create an estimate
  58. 60. Creating an invoice
  59. 61. Common types of invoice methods include: <ul><li>Set price (usually a small and simple verbal contract) </li></ul><ul><li>Cost plus, or time and materials (to charge for time and reimbursable costs) </li></ul><ul><li>Fixed price (usually a contract requiring a certain amount to be paid when a certain percentage of the work has been completed or when a milestone has been reached) </li></ul><ul><li>Progress (invoicing in stages, based on estimate) </li></ul>
  60. 62. Creating a set price invoice
  61. 63. Exercise 2-4 Creating a set price invoice
  62. 64. Invoicing for cost plus or time and materials jobs
  63. 65. Creating a fixed price invoice
  64. 66. Exercise 2-5 Creating a new fixed fee billing item
  65. 67. Creating a progress invoice
  66. 68. Job Costing
  67. 69. To use job costing to its full advantage <ul><li>Set up a Customer:Job for each of your jobs </li></ul><ul><li>Set up your items to optimize for job costing </li></ul><ul><li>Assign all your expenses to jobs. </li></ul><ul><li>Enter your estimates in QuickBooks </li></ul><ul><li>Create invoices in QuickBooks, and select the right Customer:Job on the invoice form </li></ul><ul><li>Use the QuickBooks job cost reports to learn how your business is doing on a job-by-job basis. </li></ul>
  68. 70. Setting up your customers and jobs
  69. 71. Entering bills for job-related or overhead expenses <ul><li>Enter vendor bills for job or project-related costs as items </li></ul><ul><li>Enter bills for overhead expenses (for things such as telephone, electricity, office supplies, and so on) as expenses </li></ul>
  70. 72. Exercise 3-1 Entering a bill for items
  71. 73. Using purchase orders to track committed costs or subcontractor bids
  72. 74. Exercise 3-2 Enter a subcontractor’s bill checked against the original bid
  73. 75. Entering credit card charges for project-related costs
  74. 76. Exercise 3-3 Entering credit card charges for project-related costs
  75. 77. Handling petty cash
  76. 78. Exercise 3-4 Handling petty cash
  77. 79. Understanding job cost reports
  78. 80. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Profitability Summary and Detail </li></ul><ul><li>Job Estimates vs. Actuals Summary and Detail </li></ul><ul><li>Job Costs by Vendor and Job </li></ul><ul><li>Cost to Complete by Job Summary and Detail </li></ul><ul><li>Job Costs Detail </li></ul><ul><li>Unpaid Bill by Job and Unpaid Job Bills by Vendor </li></ul><ul><li>Expenses Not Assigned to Jobs </li></ul><ul><li>Job Progress Invoices vs. Estimates </li></ul><ul><li>Item Profitability </li></ul><ul><li>Item Estimates vs. Actuals </li></ul><ul><li>Profit and Loss by Job </li></ul>
  79. 81. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Profitability Summary and Detail </li></ul><ul><li>These reports give you a snapshot of your jobs so you can see which jobs are making money—and which are not. </li></ul><ul><li>The Summary report shows revenue, cost, and profit for each of your jobs. </li></ul><ul><li>The Detail report drills down into a job, and shows revenue, cost, and profit by item for that job. </li></ul>
  80. 82. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Estimates vs. Actuals Summary and Detail </li></ul>Use these reports to see how accurate your estimates are and to improve your future estimates. This might be the most important use of job costing information.
  81. 83. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Costs by Vendor and Job </li></ul>Use these four reports to make sure you don't overpay vendors. These reports show you exactly how much you have spent with each supplier or subcontractor for each job..
  82. 84. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Cost to Complete by Job Summary and Detail </li></ul><ul><li>Use these reports to calculate the expected cost to complete your jobs. Consider reviewing this information on a regular basis to find out which jobs—or which phases of a specific job—are over or under estimate while there's still time to make adjustments. </li></ul><ul><li>The Cost to Complete by Job Summary report gives you a snapshot of the expected cost to complete all your jobs. </li></ul><ul><li>The Detail report shows you the expected cost to complete each item of a specific job. </li></ul>
  83. 85. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Costs Detail </li></ul>This report lists each individual transaction for each job you have set up in QuickBooks. It will come in handy if you need a report that breaks out all material supplier purchases, all subcontractor bills, and all labor costs (including labor burden) for each job. .
  84. 86. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Unpaid Bill by Job and Unpaid Job Bills by Vendor </li></ul>These reports show what you owe to vendors, grouped by vendor or job. Use these reports to manage your cash flow and make sure you pay your bills on time.
  85. 87. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Expenses Not Assigned to Jobs </li></ul>Use this report to help identify costs that you may have forgotten to pass along to your customers. It is important that all job-related costs get assigned to a job. Otherwise, your job cost reports will not accurately reflect all costs, making your jobs look more profitable than they really are.
  86. 88. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Job Progress Invoices vs. Estimates </li></ul>For each customer or job, this report shows whether or not the estimate is active, the estimate total, the total invoiced from the estimate on progress invoices, and the percentage of the estimate already invoiced on progress invoices.
  87. 89. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Item Profitability </li></ul>This report summarizes how much money your company has made or lost on each item (service or inventory item) that your company sells. .
  88. 90. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Item Estimates vs. Actuals </li></ul>This report summarizes how accurately your company estimated costs and revenues for the items you sell. The report compares estimated cost to actual cost and estimated revenue to actual revenue for all items.
  89. 91. Job Cost Reports <ul><li>Profit and Loss by Job </li></ul>This report shows how much you are making or losing on each job. The report includes subtotals for each type of income or expense so you can see where money is coming in and where you are spending it
  90. 92. Specialty Contractors
  91. 93. Handling reimbursable expenses
  92. 94. Using service items and subitems to track service rates <ul><li>For example, if you are an electrician and you charge your customers $80 an hour for a journeyperson electrician and $45 an hour for an apprentice, you might want to set up items and subitems like these: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Electrician Labor ( Item ) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Journeyperson ( Subitem of Electrician Labor) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Apprentice ( Subitem of Electrician Labor) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  93. 95. Handling product sales and inventory If you sell products as well as services, you may want to use the inventory feature to track the products you buy and sell.
  94. 96. Tracking noninventory materials used on a job Generally this would apply to painters, electricians, or landscape contractors who purchase materials in bulk (like paint brushes, masking tape, electrical tape, switch plates, and so on) and who want to allocate portions of the materials (perhaps a paint brush or two) to a specific job.
  95. 97. Exercise 4-1 Tracking noninventory materials used on a job
  96. 98. Commercial Contractors
  97. 99. Paying Union Benefits
  98. 100. Exercise 4-2 To see hours worked for each employee on a union job
  99. 101. Certified Payroll Reports
  100. 102. Exercise 4-3 Creating a certified payroll report
  101. 103. Tracking the costs of spec houses or developments
  102. 104. Tracking costs of construction
  103. 105. Entering costs
  104. 106. Recording the sale of a spec home <ul><li>The selling price of the home </li></ul><ul><li>The pay-off of the construction loan or note </li></ul><ul><li>Other closing costs for items such as real estate commissions, title fees, credits to the seller, credits to the buyer, and so on </li></ul><ul><li>The transfer of the capitalized costs of the home out of an asset account (Development Costs) to a cost of goods sold account </li></ul>
  105. 107. Overview of steps when you sell a spec home This method uses four separate transactions and a &quot;dummy&quot; checking account named Closing Account. The dummy account keeps dummy entries out of your real checking account and helps you avoid confusion when reconciling your real account. The balance in the dummy account will be zero if you properly enter all transactions dealing with the sale of a home.
  106. 108. Exercise 4-4 Recording the sale of a spec home
  107. 109. The End!
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