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OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
OT Academic Portfolio Spreads
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  • 1. ’10 Fall ‘08 - Fall orkDrawing Meaning, Academic WConveying LinesOscar TenaSpring 2011
  • 2. 1-6 Architectural Representation: Perception Fall 2008 Instructor: Maria Gray 17-24 Architectural Representation: Abstraction Spring 2009 Instructor: Nicole RobertsonWhat’s in a line? 39-40 Special Topics in Architecture: Drawing the Line Fall 2009 Instructor: Donald ShillingburgThere is a telling binary in architecture: the desire to designwith clarity using base linear compositions and the often 41-52 Architectural Design II Spring 2010 Instructors: Kadambari Bamore pressing need to escape the orthogonal for the sake xi, Karen Fairbanks, Mark Kroeckel, Joeb Mooreof creative expression. In creating this portfolio, I pose thequestion;What isn’t creative about a line?Whether curved or straight, thin or thick, dashed or solid, 65-68 Altschul Atrium Renovation Workshopthere are inescapable and ineffable feelings of security and Spring 2011wonder embedded in our perception of lines.Lines can even go so far as to strive toward the infinite orimaginary. They can represent the limits of our visual field toevoke depth and perspective on a two dimensional surface. bari BaxiOften, what lines express are things we cannot see from ourown particular vantage point, operating in an invisible realm.There is also a subtle and provocative interplay between 53-64 Architectural Design III Fall 2010 Instructor: Kadammanual and computer drawn lines. One often necessitatesthe other in iterative processes for study and analysis.Final rendered images benefit greatly from the guidance ofdiagrammatic or connective arrows and other constructiontype lines .Among the following projects, the role of the line indetermining form or drawing conceptual links between ideasrelates to a given design challenge. What one discovers inrevisiting these projects is what more there is to be learned 29-38 Architectural Design I Fall 2009 Instructors: Nicole Robertson, David Smiley, Peter Zuspanabout the implications of graphically edifying ideas.Lines allow us to edit // explain // experience // discover sometimes we just lose sight of it
  • 3. 1 Architectural Representation: Perception Instructor: Maria Gray 2 MoMA P.S.1 “Home Delivery” Inspired Space Precedent: micro compact house (m-ch) 2001 Richard Horden, Lydia Haack, John Hopfner, Tokyo Institute of Technology Area: 76 sq ft The linearity of thought often governs the process of architecture. Some studios work within the confines of a strict process-driven sequence of steps to deduce form. In Perception, we explored conceptual terms derived from surveying MoMA’s 2008 “Home Delivery” exhibition featuring life-size examples of modern home construction. Challenge: Work through common notions regarding concept terms derived from your visit to distort potential occupants’ perceptions of and relation to space. Derive a form which facilitates multifarious levels of interaction, isolation, participation, inactivation, etc... Learning about lines: In the scope of model production, it is vital to understand the implicit visual and physical mechanisms of a design as it creates or distorts certain perspectives views. In this space, one’s line of vision as it disappears into space through the transparency of materials is constantly interrupted by interactions with other people. This seemingly unrealistic relationship between the infinite and the tangible (in others) can only be expressed with the consideration of lines.
  • 4. 3 Architectural Representation: Perception Instructor: Maria Gray Architectural Representation: Perception Instructor: Maria Gray 4 MODULARITY MINIMALISM EXPANSION IMPRESSION REPETITION EXPANSION MINIMALISM MODULARITY REPETITION COMMERCIALISM interior experiences relate in the conception of individual and collective perceptions. limited spatial depth and narrow perspective conditions convey aspects of minimalism in respect MINIMALISM to modern living conditions. the nature of these rigidly designed MODULARITY modules almost contradicts the compactable flexibility of its REPETITION position in a place. the indeterminable range of experiences SIMULTANEITY EXPANSION and perceptions results in a “placeless” expression of minimalist and industrialized ideals. another precedent: Sequence Torque Torus Inversion Band by Richard Serra 2006 MoMA sculpture installation
  • 5. 5 Architectural Representation: Perception Instructor: Maria Gray 6
  • 6. 7 8 From 3D to 2D to 3D Architectural Representation: Abstraction it was observed that the degree of magnification caused by the Sometimes architecture involves contemplating the roles of smaller, everyday objects in our lives. Their micro-scale functionality and contributions double-curved glass of the magnifying glass is directly related to its distance away from its handle. In this case, the assembly of to task completion imply potential for investigation. For our own purposes, we delved into the mechanisms and inner workings of various trinkets. the height achieving device and disassembly of the object help to record the effect of the object’s structure. Employing methods of dissection, recombination, and documentation in a variety of media showed these objects in a new way that revealed their relation to architectural study. in 6 in. Instructor: Nicole Robertson 5 in. in 4 in 4 in. 3 in. in in 2 in. Challenge: Explore your object between in 1 in. dimensions. Create tech- nical pencil drawings of its anatomy to under- stand how it works. Import the tool into Rhino and distort it according to its functionality as an object of use. Physically export the model back into our environment in the form of a three dimensional constructInstructor: Nicole Robertson highlighting its trans- formation across virtual and spatial // material realities. x1 x 1.2 x 1.3 x 1.5 x 1.8 x 2.2 x1 x 1.2 x 1.3 x 1.5 x 1.8 x 2.2Architectural Representation: Abstraction Learning about lines: The relationship between built and digital models is as provocative as it is conceptually defying. Lines help to negotiate the transition between paper and computer by their portable nature and convenient reproducibility. The process of their transformation highlights both the delicate precision and wilful manipulation by the designer // space mediator.
  • 7. 9 10 Architectural Representation: Abstraction X 1.2 Instructor: Nicole Robertson drawing inspiration from the deconstructable nature of the magnifying glass, the X 1.8 apparent goal became to recombine its disconnected elements in some way. The primary issue of its function, that being scale, inspired the hybrid product of its analysis. Various enlarged or reduced parts connect in such a way as to reduce its conventional functionality.Instructor: Nicole Robertson X 1.5Architectural Representation: Abstraction X 2.2
  • 8. 11 12 Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson VIRTUAL to REAL 2D to 3D Another thought: What would happen to the object after extracting it from the computer back into the physical world? Speculations arise about the effects of gravity and if they would further distort theInstructor: Nicole Robertson object in its new environment. As a virtual hybrid preexisting in the weightlessness of modelling space (represented in two dimensions on the screen), the prospect of introducing more spatial conditions provokes further manipulation. connective elements adapted for sealmess joining of individually scaled partsArchitectural Representation: Abstraction a model of the hybrid’s handlepiece demonstrates potential materiality for representations of its anatomy. This specific part serves as the module for detail and proportion analysis for its variety of scale interventions.
  • 9. 13 14 Architectural Representation: Abstraction Bringing the transformed hybrid from the computer required a certain degree of reduciton and simplification. The outer cage corresponding to the textured handle of the magnifying glass posed an informative challenge. A wire frame becomes the deformed shape’s structure. Flat bristol paper strips conform to their guides, conveying the curvilinearity Instructor: Nicole Robertson of the cage.Instructor: Nicole Robertson The process for expressing the defining characteristics began with lines. Their extrusion between visual realms relates the entire performative process of architecture from conceptionArchitectural Representation: Abstraction to production.
  • 10. 15 16 Disposable Pavilions site: west 117th street and broadway sidewalk // transitional node Architecture can embody dynamism. Trajectories through a space often provide a basis for analyzing more pragmatic details. This entirely public area of pedestrian traffic represents a space of high practical use. Situated between Barnard College and Columbia University campuses, what on its surface shows no significant institutional influence actually represents an important transitional node for the schools’ affiliates. It’s mere location presupposes a relation to everyday activity, and one can begin to peel away the layers of daily crossings and interactions to discover its implicit and // or unseen characteristics. Challenge: Using an everyday, inexpensive, and disposable object, construct a site- specific pavilion for the Manhattan streetscape. Address the circulation of moving bodies through the space to somehow confront or adapt to existing environmental conditions and traffic patterns. Learning about lines: A static representation of change over time is ultimately faciliated by the dynamic use of lines. Path lines recorded throughout the day are overlayed to show how densely charged the site is at the day’s end. What we gain from lines is an ultimate understanding of usage relative to movement in order to conceive possible interventions to express the sidewalk’s inherent, invisible dynamism. main entrances site other entrances street axis Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson
  • 11. 17 18 One basis for analysis was to track paths traversed by various strangers. To imbue even more information into these lines, the amount of footsteps taken along a person’s corresponding path was recorded to gauge a general conception of the time that person spent occupying the site. The significance of the path lines not only became that they represented trajectories but also an n reflects personal ctio important change over time that se engagement with this area. ter t in ee str 0th 12 to ac ros sB roa dw ay, to Ba rna rd en tra nc ea t 11 7th west to east, east to west str ee stairs t in ter se ctio n to Ea rl H all, Co lum bia ca north to south, south to north mp us sidewalk crossing west to east, east to west crosswalk n tio ec ers west to east, east to west int sidewalk crossing ete str 6th a t 11 cen tra en ia mb olu north to south, south to north C sidewalk crossing to Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson
  • 12. 19 20 GLAD SANDWICH BAG GLAD SANDWICH BAG 2 3 zippers 1 2 3 1 4 5 6 26 2 87 24 25 27 8 23 9 44 47 10 46 29 11 45 48 12 4 67 49 30 68 50 31 13 7 7 14 90 69 0 71 2 74 51 32 15 91 73 53 33 18 92 52 34 16 17 20 55 35 19 93 75 56 36 38 76 54 39 21 57 37 58 22 94 957 80 7 59 40 5 A sequence of 60 78 81 83 overlapping pathways 79 62 4 82 1 reveals the most densely 96 84 61 traversed areas of the sidewalk, 98 99 85 97 100 43 6 transitioning into the crosswalk 63 6 42 86 4 and the peripheral entrance to 65 Columbia campus. 87 66 7 88 8 9 embedded in the materiality of this product are qualities which contribute to analytical study transparency - more clear perception of density self-adhesion - additive structuring system translation to physical model flexibility - responds to environmental conditions choosing a flexible material capable previous page: the suggested area of each area of conveying and interacting with the idea corresponds to a specific grade of color density of travel density was the criterion. The series of 100 areas of grayscale shading results from visually left: the degree of aperture and vertical position follow the segmenting the overlapping pathway scheme. Each same hierarchical organization. segment, in turn, became an individual member of the model made of disposable plastic. areas of highest density (darkest) would have corresponding members that are biggest, closest to the ground, and most present in the midst of pedestrian traffic Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson
  • 13. 21 22 C D A B A B A B C D C D Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson
  • 14. 23 24 Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson Architectural Representation: Abstraction Instructor: Nicole Robertson
  • 15. IXELSA LINE IS MADE UP OF POINTS,
  • 16. BUT THAT IS ANOTHER MATTER...
  • 17. 29 Architectural Design I Instructor: David Smiley Architectural Design I Instructor: David Smiley 30 La Ashokan Reservoir Pa lom Often times, modern urban interventions demonstrate a lack of cultural, social, political aS up erm awareness regarding general public issues. In New York City, there has been an increase Food for Thought: ark et in public interest regarding more economically and environmentally viable methods of local food processing and distribution. Simultaneously, through the proliferation of ol Rainwater Harvesting Education Center ho Sc the community garden movement in various neighborhoods throughout the city, h many more people now realize the potential benefits of urban farming. By Hig Croton Tunnel, 1893 30 million gallons per day engaging the space and politics of the city, a food and water conservation- i de tS C based education and community center brings these issues to the forefront of the s We a em d y ca t of A immediate public’s consciousness. rts nA s nia k rai Water Tunnel No. 1, 1917 520 million gallons per day i Challenge: By engaging the location’s surrounding context of public schools, local markets, and health Uk l 1 l 6 centers, create a hub of interaction and involvement with ideas of sustainable agriculture. Provide A 3 sufficient programming for various necessities, including classrooms, information booths, 10 q m 0th Str kitchens, a food bar, and an experimental garden maintained by community members. u ee Water Tunnel No. 2, 1936 550 million gallons per day i t Hopefully by engaging large groups under one common thread of activism and e l Richmond Tunnel, 1970 d e awareness this intervention would add social inequity and public health to the u s public consciousness. c t Water Tunnel No. 3 (stage 1), 1996 Learning about lines: New York City receives its water supply 1 9 via gargantuan pipelines extending to upstate reservoirs. 1 St. Rainwater harvesting devices utilize a similar Mic 7 ha el’s channeling system to acquire runoff from (usually) h urc Anticipated completion of all 4 Ep isc rooftop locations. By focusing the visual Ch stages of Water Tunnel 3, ~2020 < 1.1 billion gallons per day op al emphasis of the building around the community gardens with harvesting planes, lines acquire a Rondout Reservoir rainwater harvesting D new significance as symbols systems in NYC e of widespread efforts to l C a project a mindset of r sustainability. w Blo o y rar a om t 8 ing Lib r da o 5 le n e e u 4 New Croton Reservoir en A m Av A 1 i m q q l rda u m u e ste e i e s Am l d d e u u s Lake Gleneida c c t Jo t on Kensico Reservoir ’s W 1 es 1 tsid e 8 9 Fis 9 4 h 990 million gallons per day rate of leakage from Delaware Aqueduct 0 Ma 3 63 (scaled x 200) 25 million gallons per day s rke l1 Jerome Park Reservoir Wh o ole t ho enough for one person to eat 3 daily Fo od Sc 110 million gallons real dimensions of tank per day meals for 36 years sM blic 245’ x 245’ x 245’ (scaled x 200) ark et Pu real dimensions of tank 510’ x 510’ x 510’ Age 13 Age 49 1,912 gallons New York City Water Tunnel System to make food for a day
  • 18. 31 Architectural Design I Instructor: David Smiley Architectural Design I Instructor: David Smiley 32 EXPERIMENTAL GARDEN 1000 sq ft Conceptual Program Layouts CLASSROOMS (2) 1500 sq ft The following represent diagrammatic explorations into various possible designs for the center’s program. Below: abstraction of programmatic elements related to different concept terms derived from water-related actions. KITCHENS (2) 500 sq ft connections between terms reflect a hierarchical organization of spaces specific to each concept situation. Next Page: relating concept layouts to gravity-induced rainwater flow channels. OFFICE 250 sq ft these are designed to extend to all reaches of the experimental garden that could occur on multiple levels of the building. FOOD BAR 250 sq ft NET 3500 sq ft
  • 19. 33 Architectural Design I Instructor: David Smiley Architectural Design I Instructor: David Smiley 34 proposed rainwater harnessing surfaces utilizing both the garden and second storey roof, the exposed surface area afforded by the floorplan maximizes volume of stored rainwater and rainwater used for irrigation. roof structure: 3250 sq ft for collecting and transporting rainwater cisterns: 720 cb ft for storing rainwater garden surface: 2850 sq ft for collecting and irrigating three cylindrical rainwater cisterns perforate the rooftop structure. they appear to be structural as they frame the entryway and address the sidewalk. they are also located at key recesses along the catching surface along one side to receive more rainwater. direction of water flow rainwater catching surface based on grid layout multiple vertices are extruded upward to maximize surface area available for harvesting, resulting in a distinctive and functional form. topographic study of rainwater catching surface -an enclosing skin that functions as both shelter and harvesting as pictured above, the downward slope of the glass structure mechanism invades the second floor educational space. as the building’s experimental garden area based on grid layout centerpiece, it interacts with occupants while informing them as rainwater would trickle through the space under the right conditions. closer vertices extruded to form miniature peaks create the glass also permits light to brighten the austere interior, while its conditions for downflow irrigation. the overall height achieved supporting surfaces function as abstract space dividers. by the garden’s slope allows for different planting conditions depending on the needs of participating members of the community. meeting point of two directional flow where the harvester and garden rainwater flow is further directed toward the center to ensure physically touch to allow more irrigation an even irrigation distribution across levels. from the roof.
  • 20. 35 Architectural Design I Instructor: David Smiley Architectural Design I Instructor: David Smiley 36 E F C D G A B A B E F C D E G F A B C D G A B C D Classroom E F Kitchen C D Storage // Crawl Space G A Storage B Kitchen Experimental Garden Reception // Entry Classroom Bathrooms Office Food Bar G E F
  • 21. 15 16
  • 22. 39 40 Drawing the Line: Barnard Mailroom Hallway creating additional display and seating surface area on one continuous undulating wall unavailable display surface space available display surface space
  • 23. 41 42 Architectural Design II NYC iSchool Instructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi In New York City, modern educational initiatives are attempting to broaden the conventional boundaries of school sanctioned space so Proposed iSchool extension site the neighborhood becomes a 202 Avenue of the Americas classroom. The existing iSchool goes even further, with high-tech teaching tools centered around three learning methodologies they describe as the module; self-paced individualized instruction; and field work. Coursework is adapted to facilitate interdisciplinary learning through international video conferencing and internships related to each student’s specific interests, which they moderate themselves via the school’s online server.Instructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi Challenge: Investigate the spatial implications of an active learning style through the study of different architectural systems. Begin by constructing a program Current iSchool location detail model of the scale of those architectural systems to the on top floor of Chelsea Vocational infrastructure of the city and the (im)materiality of information H.S. 131 Avenue of the Americas and the materiality of architecture. Translate patterns of use, and organizational and building systems to interpret the seen and unseen features of this area to help define a site. Learning about lines: The process of circulating through a space lends insight into physical and conceptual connections a building makes to design conditions. A sequence of study models serves as the basis for considering the plan, sectional, and elevational details of the building beforeArchitectural Design II recording it two dimensionally. Lines break down these objects of study to reveal their innermost operations to convey more ideas and information. The exchange between representational dimensions again helps to organize conceptual and physical connections.
  • 24. 43 44 Architectural Design II Beginning with the system of entering or crossing a threshold, this model works with ideas of physi- cal and visual access to different parts of the same Instructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi space and beyond. The main circulation system serves as a framework for the structure. This system creates different moments where the activities of participating and watching focus on the idea of threshold as a unifying device. Built members obstruct and expand perspective views into the central cavity or on to infinity. Whether perception is reduced or exploded determines an experience which implicitly transmits the concep- tual framework of this device. P R O G R A MInstructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi M A T I C D E T A I LArchitectural Design II M O D E L s
  • 25. 45 46 Architectural Design II Instructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi base square scored and extruded straight upwardInstructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi self-supporting structural spine above: in its entirety, the model illustrates an extended instance in programmed threshold. it serves as the building block for a more complex spatial system.Architectural Design II right: study models of circulation speculate about the ratio between vertical and horizontal circulation and the scale of the human body to the system. circulation systems are derived from an expansion or extension of the same unit of measure; in this case, a square and a circle.
  • 26. 47 48 Architectural Design II Instructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi final massing study technology hubs -higher opacity to both encase and display areas of highest active learningInstructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari BaxiArchitectural Design II ribbon walls create liminal thresholds
  • 27. 49 50 Architectural Design II Basement Recycling and Study Space High-Tech High-Tech High-Tech Beginning/ Composting Center/ Classroom Bathrooms Classroom Classroom Reception Lockers/Library/Display Advanced Maintenance Bathrooms Bathrooms Half-Pipes Street Level Study Study Instructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi Gallery Space Work Space High-Tech Space High-Tech High-Tech Space Classroom Classroom Classroom Art Bath- Lab Flexible Gym/ rooms Performance Guidance Math/ Space Main Art Class- Art Math/ Math/ Science Office Lab room Lab Science Science Lab Lab Lab Admin. built aspects of liminality transparent structural elevator shafts human circulation ramps floor levels and rooftop garden liminal walls technology hub classrooms a transparent waste pipe runs from the green roof garden area to the recycling and compostingInstructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi center in the basement. the public is allowed access from the street to the basement via a ramp. students maintain the garden on the roof and dispose of plant waste through the waste pipe. this gesture forms a spectacle of activism by relating sustainable practices to those progressive elements of the students’ education related to modern working conditions and skill sets.Architectural Design II flexible skate ramp // performance space LIMINAL WALLS // LIMINAL LEARNING these walls enhance visual perception of the surrounding neighborhood by becoming unique space dividers and privacy walls which do not detract from the building’s overall transparency
  • 28. 51 52 Architectural Design II private rooftop garden contributes to the public composting center in the basement. travelling waste operates as a signifier of the active contributions of students to recycling efforts. instances of waste disposal down the pipe occur throughout the day, Instructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi engaging spectators’ attention through a variety of spaces and programs. The new iSchool of downtown Manhattan identifies with the progressive teaching philosophy of its educators and promotes a culture of knowledgeInstructors: Joeb Moore and Kadambari Baxi and activism amongst its students. With state- of-the-art technology built into the classrooms, budding entrepeneurs and social agents are allowed access to a variety of resources. The school’s relationship to the surrounding community calls attention to the students’ roles in field work through internship or other opportunities. Glass encased interdisciplinary learning classrooms project from the building to stand out as high-tech hubs of communication and collaboration. Cultural exchange created by community involvement in the basement recycling and composting center relates to the exchange of ideas and information embodied by the revolutionary curriculum. PublicArchitectural Design II circulation and a high degree of transparency allow for awareness of the educational endeavors of the iSchool and student involvement.
  • 29. 53 54 Art // Architecture Currency Redesigning the Chinese Yuan to reflect the modern Chinese landscape Elements of Chinese Identity The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution 1966-1976 or simply the Cultural Revolution was a Era of Reconstruction 1976-1989 In September 1976, after Mao Zedong’s death, the 1989-2002 The 1990s saw healthy economic development, 5 fen violent mass movement that resulted in PRC was left with no central authority figure, either but the closing of state-owned enterprises and ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE social, political, and economic upheaval symbolically or administratively. The Gang of Four increasing levels of corruption and unemployment, in the People’s Republic of China starting was dismantled, but Hua Guofeng continued to along with environmental challenges continued to in 1966 and ending officially with Mao’s persist on Mao-era policies. After a bloodless power plague China, as the country saw the rise to 2 fen death in 1976. It resulted in nation-wide struggle, Deng Xiaoping came to the helm to reform materialism, crime, and new-age spiritual-religious chaos, economic disarray, and stagnation. the Chinese economy and government institutions in movements such as Falun Gong. The 1990s also their entirety. saw the peaceful handover of Hong Kong and Macau to Chinese control under the formula of One 1 fen Nationalist Buildings Country, Two Systems. China also saw a new surge of nationalism when facing crises abroad. 100 50 20 10 5 Large-Scale Construction POLITICAL SYMBOLS 2 1 The 3rd edition of Chinese currency Gaoshan and Manchu men The 4th edition of Chinese currency The fifth edition of Chinese currency 5 jiao (released on April 20, 1962) (released on April 27, 1987) (released on Oct. 1, 1999) 2 jiao Buyei and Korean 1 jiao Xihu Lake in Hangzhou girls Working Class Taishan Mountain: in Miao and Zhuang Shandong province girls in red UNESCO world natural and cultural heritage site Dong and Yao girls in red Uyghur and Yi (Nuosu) girls in Great Wall of China South China Sea Three Gorges Landscapes Ethnic Minority Groups Communism green Lijiang River Tibetan girl and Yangtze River, the longest Hui elder in China Potala Palace in Lhasa Han and Mongol men Great Hall of the People Working Individuals Hukou Waterfall on An intellectual, a the Yellow River Chairman Mao Zedong farmer, and an industrial worker, NATURAL LANDMARKS characteristic Jinggangshan Mountain Chinese communist in South China PEOPLE AND CULTURE images INDIVIDUALS VS. GROUPS Mao Zedong, Zhou Evolution of the YUAN Enlai, Liu Shaoqi, 1962-present and Zhu Be, four important men to the Political Propaganda, International Influence, Functional Security founding of the People’s Republic of China [Working Class (12 font, 2 images)<Nationalist Buildings (18 font)=Communism (3 images)=Working Individuals<Large-Scale Architecture (24 font, font, 7 images)<Landscapes (60 font, 10 images)] (42 font, 7 images)<Landscapes (60 font, 10 images)] 6 font [Working Class (12 font, 2 images)<Nationalist Buildings (18 font)=Communism (3 images)=Working Individuals<Large-Scale Architecture (24 font, 4 images)<Ethnic Minority Groups (42 4 images)<Ethnic Minority Groups 6 font Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi
  • 30. 55 56 Advertisement Artistic Expression Considering the modern Landscape of China Political Propaganda Political Subversion New goals: -collaborating with internationally renowned architects (multinational) National International -recognizing modern Chinese artists for their cross-cultural // temporal influence Lessons in Redesigning Currency: Special edition of Chinese currency for the Summer Olympic Games in Beijing (released in 2008) National Stadium Yue Minjun Elements of redesign: iconic buildings “Bird’s Nest” The Symbolic Smile Beijing National Stadium Herzog and de Meuron HK Bank of China Tower historical // cultural symbols doric column discus thrower National Aquatics The special edition Beijing Olympic currency shows a certain affinity for Center Zhang Huan’s “1/2.” “Water Cube” works by or references to international figures - artists and architects. PTW Architects By advertising the importance of widespread acclaim on an equally distributive element such as money, China effectively acknowledges the potential for a different graphic expression of its own identity. proposing a modern symbology according to the hierarchy of terms derived from the previous historical analysis Beijing Capital International Airport Cai Guo-Qiang Terminal 3 Gunpowder drawing Foster and Partners 100 50 20 Ai Weiwei Descending Light National Centre for 156” by 180” by 268” Performing Arts glass crystals/stain- Opera House less brass, “The Egg” electric lights Landscapes 2007 Ethnic Minority Groups Large-Scale Construction Zhang Xiaogang CCTV Headquarters A Big Family OMA 1995 Oil on canvas 179 x 229 cm 10 -2 1 Forbidden City Yang Shaobin the legacy of the Forbidden City remains a defining aspect of China’s historical and cultural perseverance Working Individuals Communism Nationalist Buildings Working Class Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi
  • 31. 57 58 Engines of Diplomacy: Water Diplomacy in Amman sacred water space statue niche site division wall ancient well location underground passage entrance proposing a distinctive water feature for local fruit vendors to utilize ruins of the Nymphaeum - Roman fountain in the ancient city of Philadelphia (built 191 C.E.) As a city, Amman is greatly affected by the water shortage historical symbol of the sanctity of water crisis in Jordan and throughout the Middle East. Wasteful agriculture irrigation plays a large part in depleting both regional and local water supplies. This project intervenes on the small scale urban fabric of Amman to introduce a functional spectacle to bring water practice issues to the public view. By analyzing the chosen site’s surroundings and proposing an alternative irrigation system for locally produced crops, the goal is to arrive at an architecture that addresses ideas regarding the diplomacy of water sharing and distribution in the Middle East. Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi
  • 32. 59 60 providing extended space for the local fruit market across the street Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi
  • 33. 61Architectural Design IIIInstructor: Kadambari Baxi saltwater transportation truck entrance ramp to access underground passage- way ideal access to feed water into the large storage tankArchitectural Design IIIInstructor: Kadambari Baxi 62
  • 34. 63 64 Amman A colossal water tank occupies a majority of the site. The form derivation according to receding Dead Sea water levels relationship between the tube field condition and input from the Dead Sea is twofold: the vessels hold excess saltwater retrieved from Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and their vertical contours are embedded with information about the water body. Lines representing receding water levels over time form a contour line topography when extruded upwards. This method of conveying information is accompanied by the excavation of the ground one proposal for planters: plane by the storage tank. Descending circulation allows for inverted saltwater hydroponic planting method an intimate encounter with the inner mechanism of the system. by lifting the garden in the air, the ground is left for public engagement with the tube field while protecting the integrity of Ideally, water pumps would distribute a specified amount of planting and harvesting initiatives water into each tube according to the amount provided by officials delegating this resource. Recent efforts to save the Dead Sea include the multinational cooperative construction of a pipeline from the Red Sea to planter scoops harness wind to airate increase the incoming supply of saltwater. The evaporation root water and promote healthy plant growth ponds service salt manufacturers at the expense of conservation efforts. This site would have the potential to harness this salt water before it is wasted to use it for local farming purposes in Amman. Of course, this is also dependent on the amount of water exchange taking place between countries as it affects how much water reaches the Dead Sea. The success of the installation would therefore respond to the diplomatic exchanges of a precious resource governed by political bodies in the Middle East. Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi Architectural Design III Instructor: Kadambari Baxi
  • 35. 65 Oscar Tena (in collaboration with Wen Wen CC’12) Work Sample: Altschul Atrium Renovation Re-envisioning Altschul Atrium Spring 2011 Design Workshop Led by: Charles Curran and Shanshan Qi 66 proposal: Performative Grid N stage condition precedent: Engine Group Offices, London Jump Studios 2008 default condition lounge condition Altschul Science Building passage lines N view lines This workshop gave Columbia and Barnard students of all class standings the opportunity to Diana Center experiment with interior design to create a new hub of campus life for Barnard’s campus. The given project location is ideally situated across from the new student center, the Diana, in an almost program conditions circulation intervention visual connectivity abandoned ex-coffeeshop // lounge space in various programmatic layouts depict students and faculty are part of the new furniture system Alstchul. To recapture the congregational vitality of the furniture system adapted to the to circulate around and is to extend out of the atrium this space required a number of compositional and primary student activities of lounging experience Altschul in new onto the patio, and will serve taxonomical investigations in multiple iterations. and performing. the superimposed ways through the introduction as a new visual attraction in grid transforms from its default of a flexible furniture system. addition to the LED-gridded current page: inspired by the precedent, the new Altschul atrium could use position over time to accommodate interior. iconic and innovative furniture as a programmatic and functional device these functions. preliminary collaging study
  • 36. 67 Oscar Tena (in collaboration with Wen Wen CC’12) Work Sample: Altschul Atrium Renovation Spring 2011 Design Workshop Led by: Charles Curran and Shanshan Qi 68 floor: LED light display chair rubik’s couch stage default condition lounge condition stage condition display content LED-gridded interior drawing our inspiration from the pixelation of an LED screen, we propose to convert the interior into a 2’X2’ per square MEDIA grid of LED screens. furniture taxonomy IA ED in accordance with the LED M mix grid, the new furniture system consists of a basic modular INFO cubic form, with LED patterns to indicate the units’ respective functions. their transformative nature also provides the flexible programs that ultimately result from users’ INF participation. O plus CO L OR GU IDE
  • 37. Oscar TenaColumbia Col l e ge ‘11

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