Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Flattening The Walls Of The Library
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Flattening The Walls Of The Library

  • 536 views
Published

How can our school library contribute to the school's journey towards being an information literate community in the 21st century? Do technology skills and familiarity with the web necessarily add …

How can our school library contribute to the school's journey towards being an information literate community in the 21st century? Do technology skills and familiarity with the web necessarily add up to ability to find, use and evaluate information? What is the relevance of the AASL document on the 21st century learner for our school?

Published in Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
536
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • After Kim Cofino’s visit, and QA’s commitment to elearning, we all have a vivid picture of the 21st century learner.
  • The next step is to look in more detail at the composition of 21st century learning, and its implications for teachers and librarians.
  • In The World is Flat Thomas Friedman speaks of the development of globalization. In keeping with WWW terminology, he refers to Globalization 1.0, Globalization 2.0 and Globalization 3.0. This same phenomenon is treated similarly in other contexts. A summary of this progression is reproduced in the following slides
  • 10 Minutes- group discussion of what is meant by 21st century learning. How does it differ from 20th century learning? What does it mean for our students at QA, and for us as faculty? What skills and abilities do we plan that our students will be equipped with at the end of Grade 5? How are we going to ensure that they have these?
  • The American Association of School Librarians has published a document entitled Standards for the 21st century learner. Predictably, many of the suggestions you have made are included in it, as it is not specifically for libraries but for educators in general. The full text of Standards for the 21st century learner is available on the QA e-learning wiki. Its contents tie in very closely with the mission statement of the IB programme and point towards an inquiry based programme, transdisciplinary in nature, as is the PYP programme.
  • Expanding on these are the skills, resources and tools that learners use:
  • Interesting research into the use of technology by the net generation – born after 1985 - is underway in UK, US and Australia. It reminds us that familiarity with technology and the internet does not necessarily imply expertise. Technology for the net generation is often more about connection, communication and entertainment than study. Students currently entering universities world-wide often do not have the required skills It has also been found that students who are at some stage introduced to information skills will appear to master them, but as soon as they are left to their own devices, they will revert to the methods they are accustomed to Gone are the days of “Projects” – rehashing information.
  • Our students will be constructing their own meanings, using higher order thinking skills, finding answers to essential questions, and to do that they need to be able to grapple with all the different literacies that now surround us. guided inquiry, as described by Ross Todd; Jamie McKenzie’s work on engaged learning and literacy; an appropriate information search process such as PLUS This is at the heart of 21st century learning, and is an area in which librarians and teachers can work together – not in a 20 minute slot during the library lesson – but from the planning of a unit, during the course of the unit itself, to the evaluation and reflection process.
  • the key element of that role is NOT instilling a love of reading or of literature You buy a drill because you want a hole. We have libraries, not in order to have a library, or a collection of resources, but in order to improve students learning and to support the teachers. School administrators, teachers and parents aren't interested in a good library because they want good libraries or good teacher-librarians. They're interested in libraries because they want students to read better, to research effectively, to discover new ideas, learn more, and to improve achievement. (Todd, 2003)

Transcript

  • 1. Flattening the walls of the school library Qatar Academy Primary School, August 2008
  • 2. 21st century learner Kim Cofino E-Learning E-Learning4life Web 2.0 Integrating technology One laptop per child http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/
  • 3. 21 st Century Learning implications for teachers and librarians
  • 4. The World is Flat Thomas Friedman Development of globalization
  • 5. Term Globalization 1.0 Historical Context 1492– 1800 Description Columbus and the age of exploration Society Strength depended on muscle, brawn – wind power, later steam power Level of Collaboration Countries collaborating Implication for education Non formal education – tutors, aristocracy, self taught.
  • 6. Term Globalization 2.0 Historical Context 1800-2000 Description Industrial age/Modern age Society Strength depended on transport, communication, mass production Level of Collaboration Companies collaborating Implication for education Factory model of education – standardized testing/ one size fits all/ Facts are indisputable, knowledge is truth. Education extends through school, and possibly college or university. Classrooms have rows of desks – teacher is at the front – chalk and talk.
  • 7. Term Globalization 3.0 Historical Context 21st century Description Postmodern age/ information age/ Knowledge economy Society Strength depends on the individual – focus is on individuals collaborating and competing globally Level of Collaboration Individuals collaborating Implication for education Knowledge is no longer simply imparted from teacher to pupil; the learner is actively engaged in constructing his or her own learning. Success is measured in terms of outcomes statements rather than formulated as goals. The focus is less on the digestion of facts and more on ‘learning how to learn’. Education implies life-long learning. (Lonsdale & McCurry, 2004)
  • 8. What is meant by 21st century learning? How does it differ from 20th century learning? What does it mean for our students at QA, and for us as faculty? What skills and abilities do we plan that our students will be equipped with at the end of Grade 5? How are we going to ensure that they have these?
  • 9. Standards for the 21st century learner ties in closely with the IB ideals – they pre-suppose an inquiry based programme, transdisciplinary in nature, as is the PYP programme.
  • 10.
    • There are 9 common beliefs:
    • Reading is a window to the world
    • Inquiry provides a framework for learning
    • Ethical behavior in the use of information must be taught
    • Learning has a social context
    • Technology skills are crucial for future employment needs
    • Equitable access is a key component for education.
    • The definition of information literacy has become more complex as resources and technologies have changed
    • The continuing expansion of information demands that all individuals acquire the thinking skills that will enable them to learn on their own.
    • School libraries are essential to the development of learning skills.
  • 11.
    • The skills, resources and tools that learners use
      • Inquire, think critically and gain knowledge
      • Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new situations, and create knowledge.
      • Share knowledge and participate ethically and productively as members of our society
      • Pursue personal and aesthetic growth.
  • 12. Techno savvy or just techno oriented? How do the Net Generation search for information? Barbara Combes Familiarity with technology and the internet does not necessarily imply expertise. Technology for the net generation is often more about connection, communication and entertainment than study Do our students have the skills to find information, to evaluate it, to store it for later use, or to organize it?
  • 13. This is at the heart of 21st century learning, and is an area in which librarians and teachers can work together. The challenge for the primary school
  • 14. The role of a school librarian: the library’s contribution to teaching and learning in the school. James Herring (2008) Ross Todd (2003) uses the analogy of a drill:
  • 15. You buy a drill because you want a hole. We have libraries, not in order to have a library, or a collection of resources, but in order to improve students learning and to support the teachers. School administrators, teachers and parents aren't interested in a good library because they want good libraries or good teacher-librarians. They're interested in libraries because they want students to read better, to research effectively, to discover new ideas, learn more, and to improve achievement. (Todd, 2003)
  • 16.
    • The question is how can we do that?
    • incorporating the standards for 21st century learners into the PYP planners,
    • meaningful collaboration,
    • adequate allocation of time to reflect on and review the units of inquiry,
    • commitment and willingness by each grade level team so that together we can meet the needs of our learners in the 21st century.
    • full acceptance of Web 2.0 – moving from Web 1.0 which was the use of the internet for research, for finding information, to Web 2.0 with its promise of creativity and collaboration, the read write web, where students will use information, construct their own knowledge, share their ideas globally
    • flattening the walls of the library – using the library as a teaching and learning space, not just a repository for resources, and having the librarians as members of the grade level teams..
  • 17. Supporting articles on the QA elearning wiki: AASL , Standards for the 21st century learner. Asselin, M & Doiron, R (2008) Towards a Transformative Pedagogy for School Libraries 2.0 a framework for the work of school libraries in new times based on research in new literacies, today’s learners, and emerging concepts of knowledge. Lonsdale, M., & McCurry, D. (2004), Literacy in the new millennium. National Centre for Vocational Education Research . Multiple literacies must be taken into account for the 21st century learner. McKenzie, J fno.org Todd, R (2003), School libraries – Making them a class act
  • 18. Bibliography AASL , (2007) Standards for the 21st century learner. Asselin, M & Doiron, R (2008) Towards a Transformative Pedagogy for School Libraries 2.0, School Libraries Worldwide – Volume 14, Number 2, July 2008, retrieved August 8, 2008, from http://schoollibrariesworldwide-vol14no2.blogspot.com/ Combes, B (2008) Techno savvy or just techno oriented? How do the the Net Generation search for information? ASLA Online III Virtual Conference 2008 – Under construction: A world without walls Herring, J (2008), Expectations and reality: The role of the teacher librarian in the digital age, ASLA Online III Virtual Conference 2008 – Under construction: A world without walls Lonsdale, M., & McCurry, D. (2004), Literacy in the new millennium. National Centre for Vocational Education Research . http://www.ncver.edu.au/research/proj/nr2L02.pdf?%20PHPSESSID=88003e027abcca2d3f0c8937c08a6cca Todd, R (2003), School libraries – Making them a class act, School Library Conference, WA, retrieved August 12, 2008, from http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~rtodd/WA%20School%20Libraries%20A%20Class%20Act.ppt