Union square

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  • Image: “Metronome” by Kristin Jones/Andrew Ginzel, Union Sq., NYC (1999) < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Unionsq_metronome.gif >
  • Union Square Park spans nearly 3.6 acres and is located between 14 th and 17 th Streets, between University and 4 th Avenue, at its south end, and between Broadway and Park Avenue South at its north end. Union Square was given it’s name because of the “union” that occurs there between two of the largest streets in the city. Image: “Union Square Park” by Noel Y.C. (2009) < http://nyclovesnyc.blogspot.com/2009/05/union-square-park.html >
  • The park sits directly above the transportation hub for the L, N, Q, R, W, 4, 5 and 6 trains, with multiple train entrances scattered around the park, not to mention having two train kiosks within the park itself. Over the years, Union Square has come to refer to more than just the park itself, but also to the bustling commercial and residential area that surrounds it.
  • Now, let us go through a little bit of the park’s history. In 1807, the area was designated as Union Place by the Commissioner’s Gridiron Plan, which was approved in legislature in 1811. In 1831, Union Square was authorized as a public place by the New York State Legislature. In 1833, the land was acquired by New York City. On July 19 th , 1839, the park was opened to the public. In 1872, the park’s plan was completety redesigned by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. On September 5 th , 1882, at least 10,000 workers paraded down Broadway to rally at Union Square during the first ever Labor Day celebration, before it even became a national holiday. Between 1928 and 1929, the park was demolished to allow for construction of the underground subway concourse. In 1976 the Greenmarket farmer’s market was first opened. And in 1997, the park was designated as a national historic landmark due to its significance as a part of labor history. Image: "The 'Union' mass meeting held in Union Square, New York on the 20th of April” by The Illustrated London News (1861) <http://www.printsoldandrare.com/newyorkcity/>
  • Over the years Union Square has developed and expanded in numerous ways. Within the park there is a dog run, playground, paths lined with benches, and lots of grassy area to sit on when the weather is nice. Various art vendors line up from the southwest corner of the park to about 16 th Street, making up Union Square’s artists market.
  • On Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays the artists’ tables make way for the Union Square Greenmarket, the city’s largest farmer’s market, which begins on 15 th Street and wraps around the north end of the park through the plaza, running on approximately 2 acres of parkland, and hosting over 140 producers every week. The selection of goods ranges from fruits and vegetables to meats, cheeses, baked goods, breads, wines, and much more. The Greenmarket also hosts occasional events such as book signings and food tastings. Opening up every year soon after thanksgiving is the Holiday Market, with over 100 vendors selling unique gift items for the holiday season…
  • … from red and white striped booths lining the south and west sides of the park. Image: “Union Square Holiday Market and Subway Station” by Karen Seiger (2009) < http://www.marketsofnewyork.com/2009/12/holiday-markets-%E2%80%93-union-square/comment-page-1/ >
  • This year will mark the market’s 14 th year. Image: “Union Square Holiday Market” by Maria (2009) < http://newyork.going.com/event-685918;Union_Square_Holiday_Market >
  • There are also oftentimes various celebrations, political demonstrations, or performers attracting a crowd at the west end of the park.
  • Union Square Park is run and maintained through a public/private partnership with the Union Square Partnership and the Department of Parks & Recreation. They work together to target the demands of park goers and set goals for the necessary improvements that need to be made. The Union Square Partnership makes targeted investments to ensure that the maintenance and beautification of the park is possible. The partnership arranges for painting of the railings and benches throughout the park when needed to maintain a fresh look. They employ a landscaping team that aerates and fertilizes soil on a regular basis to ensure that the lawns are always healthy, in addition to alloting funds for a gardener during the summer to maintain the plant life through the park. They plan to install a new irrigation system thorough the park and reseed the center, eastern, and southern lawns during this year.
  • To maintain the cleanliness of the park, the partnership employs extermination services and sanitation efforts, such as washing garbage cans, in addition to the efforts of the Department of Parks & Recreation and Sanitation. Between April and October, the partnership also employs a special five-person sanitation team to clean the park and help manage the increased activity during the summer months. The partnership employs Public Safety officers to patrol the park daily, in addition to a Parks Enforcement Patrol Officer assigned by the Parks Department to patrol during the day and evening.
  • Starting out, the park was designed following the examples of London residential squares…
  • … with lots of foliage surrounding the paths within the park … Image: “Clapton Square, Hackney” by Danny Robinson (2007) < http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/402498 >
  • Image: “Golden Square” by Fin Fahey (2006) < http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Golden_square_1.jpg >
  • Image: “Students studying in Soho Square” by Ben Burris (2005) < http://travel.webshots.com/photo/1301195928066719319HpqwWr >
  • Image: “Kensington Gardens Square” by Kensington Gardens Square Garden Association (2007) < http://www.kgsgarden.org.uk/ >
  • The park was surrounded by iron fencing and its original focus was the large fountain located in its center. Renovations have been sporadic over the years since the park initially opened to the public and have been ongoing since 1986.
  • In the 1872 redesigning plan, landscape architects Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux removed the iron fencing, added a number of thick trees throughout the park, and widened the walkways within. In 1928 and 1929 when park was destroyed to build the subway concourse underneath it, many alterations were made to the park following the concourse completion including straightening of the paths and the construction of the colonnaded bandstand pavilion, which replaced the previous Ladies Pavilion, on the parks north end. In 1985, Mayor Edward Koch began overseeing renovations that included creating a new plaza at the south end of the park, reworking pathways within the park to make it more accessible, the planting of a central lawn, installing new lighting, and the building of two subway kiosks. In 1993 and 1994, two new playgrounds were constructed at the north end of the park. And in 1994 the open-air Luna Park restaurant was opened in the courtyard, behind the colonnaded pavilion. Finally in 2002, the park’s triangle at the southeast end was reconstructed and expanded.
  • The most recent phase of Union Square’s renovation began in the spring of 2008. This multi-faceted plan to revamp the north end of the park is scheduled to be completed in the winter of this year, with an estimated total cost of $20,000. The restoration plan was designed by landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburg… Image: “Union Square 1” by Michael Van Valkenburgh Association < http://www.mvvainc.com/#/PROJECTS/7/79/ >
  • … who has worked on areas like the Hudson River Park and Brooklyn Bridge Park. Image: “Hudson River Park” by Pine & Swallow Environmental < http://www.pineandswallow.com/landscape-science/ >
  • Image: “Hudson River Park Sculpture” by Charlotte (2005) < http://www.flickr.com/photos/charlottewebgal/18286956/ >
  • Image: “Brooklyn Bridge Park 7” by Michael Van Valkenburgh Association < http://www.mvvainc.com/#/PROJECTS/7/89/ >
  • The first part of the plan, which was completed last September, was the restoration of the plaza. The plaza was elevated to sidewalk level and re-paved, to feature a multi-tonal geometric pattern. Another addition to the plaza was a strip of trees planted along the north edge of the park serving as a barrier between 17 th Street traffic and the plaza. The trees are each surrounded by two vertical posts, containing an electric feed designed for use by Union Square’s Greenmarket vendors …
  • … in efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions produced by generator usage.
  • The playground part of the plan was completed in October of last year, and was opened to the public in early January. Previously, Union Square contained two small playgrounds on either side of the pavilion and seasonal Luna Park restaurant. The renovation plans called for the demolishing of these two parks to build a 15,000 square-foot state of the art playground, spanning the north end of the park.
  • The playground features SofSurfaces rubber tiles, which prevent cuts and scrapes caused by cement. Japanese cryptomeria trees are planted throughout the playground…
  • … to provide an almost forest-like feel…
  • … in addition to the greenery planted on the periphery of the playground. There is a “Tot Lot” area designed especially for toddlers…
  • … various futuristic structures for climbing, and spinning…
  • … like the huge metal dome mountain, the Icarus carousel swing…
  • … the teacup-like spinning dish …
  • … and the human-sized cattails that sway kids in the wind …
  • … and of course the playground essentials like swings and slides.
  • Still in construction on the east side of the pavilion, will be a family bathroom with entry only from within the park…
  • … as a part of a comfort station with separate men and women’s bathrooms.
  • This part of the plan is not yet complete, but is estimated to be finished by this winter. The colonnaded pavilion will be completely restored. An elevator and sets of stairs will provide access to the basement level of the pavilion. A comfort station will be built on the east side of the pavilion and will include restroom facilities. The pavilion will be lit to glow during the nighttime. Plans for its use are undecided as there has been much debate over the original plan to have the upper-level house an open-air restaurant concession.
  • However, despite all of the improvements that have been made over the past 170 years since the park was opened to the public, room for improvement still remains. Each year the Union Square Partnership emails a Community Opinion Survey to local residents, businesses, and other stakeholders of the area to gain feedback about the current state of the area as well as to target areas of concern or in need of improvement. Based on the responses to these surveys over the past two years, the community desires an increased sense of safety and more of an artistic identity in the park.
  • In the 2008 Community Opinion Survey, 43% of those who responded believed that the most important issue facing Union Square was pedestrian congestion and safety.
  • In the 2009 Community Opinion Survey, the number dropped to 27%, however, it was still the issue with the highest percentage and therefore improvements still need to be made.
  • In 2008, the Community Opinion Survey found that 30% of people wished to see an increased programming of musical, theater and dance performances. 12% said they desired art and horticultural installments and events.
  • In the 2009 Community Opinion Survey, although there was no question about the programming people would like to see increased, when asked what kinds of subjects they would like to receive more information about, 23% said events in the park, and 21% said arts and entertainment, showing that there is still a high demand for a more prevalent artistic identity in the park.
  • As was mentioned earlier, the Union Square Partnership employs public safety officers to patrol the area in addition to a Parks Enforcement Patrol Officer assigned by the Parks Department. When asked, 8 out of 10 people stated that the presence of public safety officers did not effectively increase their sense of safety. The common reasons given were that the officers do not patrol past park operating hours, which are generally around dusk, and that they have a limited amount of power and authority when compared to an NYPD officer. A few people I spoke to said that they felt safe knowing that there was an NYPD precinct in the train station right below Union Square. However, that so-called precinct is really just the District 4 Transit Police Bureau…
  • … meaning that their presence is solely underground.
  • To improve the overall sense of safety in Union Square, an above ground NYPD presence is necessary. The best way to create this police presence is to build a police booth by the park. The ideal place for this booth to be situated is on Union Square East between 14 th and 15 th Streets…
  • … Here is a picture of the proposed area… Image: “Subway as Intermediary Public Space” by Jay Shuffield < http://www.urbanresidue.com/theory/subway.html >
  • … And here is a picture of what a police booth, like the one at the Broadway-Nassau train station in Brooklyn, would look like when placed in the area. Although this booth pictured is sized for one officer … Image: “PMSC NYPD Police Booth, Broadway-Nassau Street Subway Station, New York City” by Jag9889 < http://www.flickr.com/photos/jag9889/2913115099/ >
  • … the booth in Union square will be expanded to fit two officers, ensuring the presence of at least two officers in the park at a given time. In addition officers will make rounds through the park.
  • Now, on to the next issue: arts and entertainment. Union Square currently contains five bronze statues throughout the park. There is the Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi statue …
  • … located on the west side of the park, by 14 th Street …
  • … the old drinking fountain …
  • … also on the west side of the park, between 15 th and 16 th Streets …
  • … the Abraham Lincoln Statue …
  • … which sits at the north end of the park…. Image: “Union Square: Abraham Lincoln Statue” by wallyg (2007) <http://www.flickr.com/photos/wallyg/432660194/>
  • … directly in front of the playground …
  • … the Marquis de Lafayette statue …
  • … on the east side of the park on 15 th street …
  • … and finally the George Washington statue …
  • … which serves as a sort of centerpiece at the park’s west end on 14 th Street …
  • However, not always very noticeable among the trees and plants, something aside from these statues needs to be introduced to increase an artistic identity within the park.
  • To achieve this increased artistic identity, at least two art exhibits or sculptures must be installed each year: one during the spring months between March and May, and one during the summer months between June and August. …
  • … There are plenty of open areas throughout the park where art can be installed… Sculpture image distored from: “177” by Rebecca Fox < http://fineartamerica.com/featured/9215-177-rebecca-fox.html >
  • Sculpture image distored from: “177” by Rebecca Fox < http://fineartamerica.com/featured/9215-177-rebecca-fox.html >
  • Sculpture image distored from: “177” by Rebecca Fox < http://fineartamerica.com/featured/9215-177-rebecca-fox.html >
  • Sculpture image distored from: “177” by Rebecca Fox < http://fineartamerica.com/featured/9215-177-rebecca-fox.html >
  • The Union Square Partnership will also coordinate free events in the park through the spring and summer in the south and north plazas, such as art classes for adults and children, yoga, plays, musical performances, and more. In addition, legislation needs to be passed to prevent the pavilion from becoming an open-air concession restaurant, ensuring that there is a venue in which to hold these community events for the public.
  • There are a number of free events currently offered around the Union Square area, in addition to many for-cost activities and events, and can be found on Union Square’s Partnerships website…
  • … where things like plays, author events, and yoga classes are listed…
  • … However, there is no way to know about the website unless you stumble across it on the web or from word of mouth. There is no advertising within the area to inform the public that the site exists, like that seen…
  • … in Madison Square Park….
  • There need to be signs placed strategically through the park in high traffic areas to notify the public about the USP website’s existence.
  • Over the years “Union Square” has come to refer to not just the park itself, but to the bustling community around it. Union Square Park has developed, expanded and improved drastically through numerous renovations and has come one step closer to perfection every time. Setting the proposals in this presentation in motion is the key to moving Union Square yet another step closer.
  • Union square

    1. 2. About Union Square Park <ul><li>3.59 acres large </li></ul><ul><li>Located between 14 th and 17 th street and between University and 4 th Avenue /Broadway and Park Avenue South </li></ul><ul><li>Given it’s name because it is the </li></ul><ul><li>“ union of the two principal thoroughfares of the island.” </li></ul><ul><li>– Stephen Jenkins, The Greatest Street in the </li></ul><ul><li>World: The Story of Broadway, Old and New </li></ul>
    2. 4. History <ul><li>1807- Area was designated as Union Place by the Commissioner's Gridiron Plan </li></ul><ul><li>1831- Union Square was authorized as a public place by the New York State Legislature </li></ul><ul><li>1833- Land was acquired by New York City </li></ul><ul><li>1839- The park was opened to the public </li></ul><ul><li>1872- Park’s plan was completely redesigned by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux </li></ul><ul><li>1882- At least 10,000 workers paraded down Broadway to rally at Union Square during the first ever Labor Day celebration </li></ul><ul><li>1928-29- Park was demolished to allow for the building of the underground subway concourse </li></ul><ul><li>1976- Greenmarket farmer’s market opens </li></ul><ul><li>1997- The park was designated a national historic landmark due to its significance as a part of labor history. </li></ul>
    3. 5. Union Square Today <ul><li>Within there is a dog run, playground, paths lined with benches, and lots of grassy area. </li></ul><ul><li>Art vendors line up around the park making up the artists market. </li></ul>
    4. 7. Union Square Today <ul><li>Within there is a dog run, playground, paths lined with benches, and lots of grassy area. </li></ul><ul><li>Art vendors line up around the park making up the artists market. </li></ul><ul><li>Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays the Greenmarket, the city’s largest farmer’s market, is open. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Goods range from fruits and vegetables to meats, cheeses, breads, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Greenmarket also hosts occasional events. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Every year after Thanksgiving the Holiday Market opens up with over 100 vendors selling unique gift items for the holiday season. </li></ul>
    5. 10. Union Square Today <ul><li>Within there is a dog run, playground, paths lined with benches, and lots of grassy area. </li></ul><ul><li>Art vendors line up around the park making up the artists market. </li></ul><ul><li>Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays the Greenmarket, the city’s largest farmer’s market, is open. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Goods range from fruits and vegetables to meats, cheeses, breads, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Greenmarket also hosts occasional events. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Every year after Thanksgiving the Holiday Market opens up with over 100 vendors selling unique gift items for the holiday season. </li></ul><ul><li>There are oftentimes various celebrations, political demonstrations, or performers at the west end of the park. </li></ul>
    6. 11. Union Square Partnership <ul><li>Union Square Park is run through a public/private partnership with the Union Square Partnership and the Department of Parks & Recreation. </li></ul><ul><li>USP targets the demands of park goers and sets goals for the necessary improvements to be made. </li></ul><ul><li>Beautification: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>USP arranges for the painting of railings and benches. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employs a landscaping team that aerates and fertilizes soil on a regular basis and allot funds for a gardener during the summer. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan to install a new irrigation system and reseed the center, eastern, and southern lawns this year. </li></ul></ul>
    7. 12. Union Square Partnership <ul><li>Cleanliness: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>USP employs extermination services and sanitation efforts, such as washing garbage cans. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Also employs a five person sanitation team to clean the park and help manage the increased activity during summer months. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan to install a new irrigation system and reseed the center, eastern, and southern lawns. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Safety: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>USP employs Public Safety officers to patrol the park daily. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There is also a Parks Enforcement Patrol Officer assigned by the Parks Department to patrol in the day and evening </li></ul></ul>
    8. 13. Renovations <ul><li>Park was designed following examples of London’s residential garden squares. </li></ul>
    9. 14. Clapton Square, London
    10. 15. Golden Square, London
    11. 16. Soho Square, London
    12. 17. Kensington Gardens Square, London
    13. 18. Renovations <ul><li>Park was designed following examples of London’s residential garden squares. </li></ul><ul><li>Park was surrounded by iron fencing. </li></ul><ul><li>Park’s original focus was its large fountain. </li></ul><ul><li>Renovations have been sporadic over the years. </li></ul><ul><li>Have been ongoing since 1986. </li></ul>
    14. 19. <ul><li>1872: Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux removed the iron fencing, added a number of thick trees, and widened the walkways. </li></ul><ul><li>1948-49: Park was destroyed to build the subway concourse, followed by many alterations— straightening of the paths and the construction of the colonnaded bandstand pavilion. </li></ul><ul><li>1985: Mayor Edward Koch began renovations that included creating a new plaza at the south end of the park, reworking pathways within the park, planting a central lawn, installing new lighting, and building of two subway kiosks. </li></ul><ul><li>1993-94: Two new playgrounds were constructed. </li></ul><ul><li>1994: The open-air Luna Park restaurant was opened. </li></ul><ul><li>2002: Park’s triangle at the southeast end was reconstructed and expanded. </li></ul>Renovations
    15. 20. <ul><li>Most recent phase of renovation began in Spring 2008. </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-faceted plan to revamp the north end of the park. </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduled to be done by Winter 2010. </li></ul><ul><li>Estimated total cost: $20,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Designed by landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburg. </li></ul>North End Restoration Project
    16. 21. Hudson River Park
    17. 22. The Apple, Hudson River Park
    18. 23. Brooklyn Bridge Park
    19. 24. North End Restoration: Plaza <ul><li>Completed in September 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>Plaza was elevated to sidewalk level and re-paved, to feature a multi-tonal geometric pattern. </li></ul><ul><li>A strip of trees was planted along the north edge of the park. </li></ul><ul><li>Vertical posts with electric feeds for Greenmarket </li></ul>
    20. 25.  Electric feed posts
    21. 26.  Electric feed posts  
    22. 27. North End Restoration: Playground <ul><li>Completed in October 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>Opened to the public in early January 2010. </li></ul><ul><li>Park previously contained two small playgrounds which were demolished to build a new a 15,000 square foot playground. </li></ul>
    23. 28. North End Restoration: Playground <ul><li>Features: </li></ul><ul><li>SofSurfaces rubber tiles </li></ul><ul><li>Japanese cryptomeria trees planted throughout </li></ul>
    24. 29.  Japanese cryptomeria
    25. 30. North End Restoration: Playground <ul><li>Features: </li></ul><ul><li>SofSurfaces rubber tiles </li></ul><ul><li>Japanese cryptomeria trees planted throughout </li></ul><ul><li>Greenery planted on the periphery of the playground </li></ul><ul><li>A “Tot Lot” area designed especially for toddlers </li></ul>
    26. 31. Tot Lot  sandbox
    27. 32.  Tot Lot jungle gym
    28. 33. North End Restoration: Playground <ul><li>Features: </li></ul><ul><li>SofSurfaces rubber tiles </li></ul><ul><li>Japanese cryptomeria trees planted throughout </li></ul><ul><li>Greenery planted on the periphery of the playground </li></ul><ul><li>A “Tot Lot” area designed especially for toddlers </li></ul><ul><li>Various futuristic structures for climbing and spinning </li></ul>
    29. 34.  The Mountain   Icarus 
    30. 35.  Spinning Dish
    31. 36.  Life-sized swaying cattails
    32. 37. North End Restoration: Playground <ul><li>Features: </li></ul><ul><li>SofSurfaces rubber tiles </li></ul><ul><li>Japanese cryptomeria trees planted throughout </li></ul><ul><li>Greenery planted on the periphery of the playground </li></ul><ul><li>A “Tot Lot” area designed especially for toddlers </li></ul><ul><li>Various futuristic structures for climbing and spinning </li></ul><ul><li>Playground essentials like swings and slides </li></ul>
    33. 38. Tunnel Slide 
    34. 39. Another slide 
    35. 40. North End Restoration: Playground <ul><li>Features: </li></ul><ul><li>SofSurfaces rubber tiles </li></ul><ul><li>Japanese cryptomeria trees planted throughout </li></ul><ul><li>Greenery planted on the periphery of the playground </li></ul><ul><li>A “Tot Lot” area designed especially for toddlers </li></ul><ul><li>Various futuristic structures for climbing and spinning </li></ul><ul><li>Playground essentials like swings and slides </li></ul><ul><li>Still in construction is a family bathroom </li></ul>
    36. 41.  Comfort Station in progress
    37. 42. North End Restoration: Pavilion <ul><li>Estimated completion: Winter 2010. </li></ul><ul><li>To be completely restored. </li></ul><ul><li>Will have an elevator and stairs for access to the basement level. </li></ul><ul><li>A comfort station will be built, including restroom facilities. </li></ul><ul><li>The pavilion will be lit to glow during the nighttime. </li></ul><ul><li>Plans for use are undecided. </li></ul>
    38. 43. More Improvements <ul><li>Despite all of the improvements that have been made over the years, room for improvement still remains. </li></ul><ul><li>Each year USP emails a Community Opinion Survey to local residents, businesses, and other stakeholders in the area. </li></ul><ul><li>Based on the responses to these surveys over the past two years, the community desires an increased sense of safety and more of an artistic identity in the park. </li></ul>
    39. 48. Safety <ul><li>USP employs public safety officers to patrol the area, in addition to a Parks Enforcement Patrol Officer. </li></ul><ul><li>8 out of 10 people stated that the presence of public safety officers did not effectively increase their sense of safety. </li></ul><ul><li>They do not patrol past park operating hours. </li></ul><ul><li>They have a limited amount of power and authority. </li></ul><ul><li>The NYPD presence in the Union Square subway station is only the District 4 Traffic Bureau. </li></ul>
    40. 49.
    41. 50. <ul><li>The best way to create an above ground NYPD presence is to build a police booth by the park. </li></ul><ul><li>Proposed location: Union Square East between 14 th and 15 th street. </li></ul>Proposals for Change
    42. 53. <ul><li>The best way to create an above ground NYPD presence is to build a police booth by the park. </li></ul><ul><li>Proposed location: Union Square East between 14 th and 15 th street. </li></ul><ul><li>Booth will be adequately sized to fit two officers. </li></ul><ul><li>Officers will make rounds through the park. </li></ul>Proposals for Change
    43. 54. <ul><li>Statues: </li></ul><ul><li>Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi </li></ul>Arts & Entertainment
    44. 56. <ul><li>Statues: </li></ul><ul><li>Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi </li></ul><ul><li>Union Square Drinking Fountain </li></ul>Arts & Entertainment
    45. 58. <ul><li>Statues: </li></ul><ul><li>Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi </li></ul><ul><li>Union Square Drinking Fountain </li></ul><ul><li>Abraham Lincoln </li></ul>Arts & Entertainment
    46. 61. <ul><li>Statues: </li></ul><ul><li>Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi </li></ul><ul><li>Union Square Drinking Fountain </li></ul><ul><li>Abraham Lincoln </li></ul><ul><li>Marquis de Lafayette </li></ul>Arts & Entertainment
    47. 63. <ul><li>Statues: </li></ul><ul><li>Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi </li></ul><ul><li>Union Square Drinking Fountain </li></ul><ul><li>Abraham Lincoln </li></ul><ul><li>Marquis de Lafayette </li></ul><ul><li>George Washington </li></ul>Arts & Entertainment
    48. 65. <ul><li>Statues: </li></ul><ul><li>Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi </li></ul><ul><li>Union Square Drinking Fountain </li></ul><ul><li>Abraham Lincoln </li></ul><ul><li>Marquis de Lafayette </li></ul><ul><li>George Washington </li></ul><ul><li>But what else… </li></ul>Arts & Entertainment
    49. 66. <ul><li>At least two art exhibits or sculptures must be installed each year: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One during the spring months: March – May </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One during the summer months: June – August </li></ul></ul>Proposals for Change
    50. 71. <ul><li>At least two art exhibits or sculptures must be installed each year: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One during the spring months: March – May </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One during the summer months: June – August </li></ul></ul><ul><li>USP must coordinate free events such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Art classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Yoga </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plays </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Musical Performances </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Etc… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Legislation must be passed preventing the pavilion from becoming an open-air restaurant concession so it can be used to host free community events. </li></ul>Proposals for Change
    51. 72. <ul><li>A number of free events are currently offered in the Union Square area. </li></ul><ul><li>Information can be found on the USP website. </li></ul>Proposals for Change
    52. 74. <ul><li>A number of free events are currently offered in the Union Square area. </li></ul><ul><li>Information can be found on the USP website. </li></ul><ul><li>No advertising within the area to inform the public that the site exists. </li></ul>Proposals for Change
    53. 77. <ul><li>A number of free events are currently offered in the Union Square area. </li></ul><ul><li>Information can be found on the USP website. </li></ul><ul><li>No advertising within the area to inform the public that the site exists. </li></ul><ul><li>Signs need to be placed strategically throughout the park in high traffic areas to notify the public of the USP website. </li></ul>Proposals for Change
    54. 79. <ul><li>Over the years “Union Square” has come to refer </li></ul><ul><li>to not just the park itself, but to the bustling </li></ul><ul><li>community around it. Union Square Park has </li></ul><ul><li>developed, expanded and improved drastically </li></ul><ul><li>through numerous renovations and has come </li></ul><ul><li>one step closer to perfection every time. Setting </li></ul><ul><li>the proposals in this presentation in motion is the </li></ul><ul><li>key to moving Union Square yet another step </li></ul><ul><li>closer… </li></ul>Conclusion

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