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The Us Academic Book Market
 

The Us Academic Book Market

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    The Us Academic Book Market The Us Academic Book Market Presentation Transcript

    • The US Academic Book Market: Selling to the Trade Publishing Workshop, Beijing, September 4, 2007 H. Dirk Koehler, Publisher, The World Bank, Washington, DC This presentation is based on a presentation by Jose de Buerba, Distribution Manager, The Office of the Publisher, The World Bank, Washington, DC
    • Overview
      • Market Characteristics
      • New Title Data Dissemination
      • Wholesale
      • Retail
      • Sales Representatives
      • Distributors
      • Events and Exhibitions
      • Useful Links
    • Market Characteristics
      • Two very clearly defined seasons:
        • Fall: July to December
        • Spring: January to June
      • The importance of the catalogue
        • Strongly recommend publishing two per year
        • Should mostly include new and forthcoming titles (as far as six months in advance)
        • OK to include popular backlist, clearly indicating that fact, e.g. by “previously announced”
        • Different catalogues for different audiences: library market, trade accounts, individual and other direct customers
    • Market Characteristics (ctd.)
      • Not only/mostly for the trade, but important:
      • Web presence is absolutely crucial (“If it can’t be found on the web, it doesn’t exist”); most people now consider full text online as supporting – not cannibalizing -- print sales
      • Direct marketing through mail and phone has become less important in the last few years
      • Email, RSS, and other e-promotion very important
    • New Title Data Dissemination
      • Very important for trade accounts and very time consuming for publishers (but can be outsourced, e.g. see below)
      • Important to have good supporting systems for data retrieval (data should be ONIX compliant)
      • Trade accounts usually request data 6 months in advance
      • Each company has different specifications and asks for data in different formats
      • Bowker also feeds data to trade accounts (but publisher has to feed Bowker)
    • Screenshot BowkerLink
    • Screenshot Editeur: ONIX
    • The Wholesale Market: Baker & Taylor
      • Largest US academic wholesaler, includes YBP and Majors
      • Main customers: academic libraries, international sales, trade
      • Visit buyer at least twice a year (New Jersey)
      • Important to prepare sales analysis
      • Metadata VERY important (two files), include three BISAC subject codes for each book plus other bibliographic information
      • Submit data at least 3 months in advance of publication date, and make sure all titles are in system when mailing catalogue
      • Orders received via EDI (publishers warehouse EDI compliant)
      • Co-Operative marketing opportunities available (recommended)
      • Active continuations department for standing orders
      • TitleSource3 & Pub Alley (more expensive) allows publishers to track demands, upload data, compare sales of related titles…
    • The Wholesale Market: Ingram
      • Main customers: bookstores and other trade accounts, also strong in the library market (less so than B&T)
      • Also requires metadata, different format than B&T
      • Visit buyer at least once a year (Tennessee)
      • Strong in trade market: returns usually high (for WB they supply Borders)
      • Co-Op marketing mandatory (minimum $1,200)
      • Lightning Source part of the group and located down the road. Automatic supply of POD titles
      • Online web for publishers also available (I-page)
    • The Wholesale Market: Blackwell’s Book Services
      • Specialized in library sales
      • Funded in 1879
      • HQ in UK, USA and Australia
      • Very strong export market and library tenders
      • No electronic title feed required, send information via e-mail, catalogues and sales kits
      • Publisher Online Service (POS) available
    • Other Wholesalers / Jobbers
      • Follet Library Services (also retail)
      • The Book House
      • Emery Pratt
      • Brodart (public libraries)
      • Eastern Books
      • Rittenhouse (health titles)
      • Matthew’s Book Company (health titles)
    • The Retail Market: Barnes & Noble
      • 820 stores in the US nationwide
      • Need to submit metadata to their distribution center
      • Four different store categories:
        • National Chain, Academic Stores, Academic Text Services, online store ( www.barnesandnoble.com )
      • National Chain
        • Visit buyers twice a year (usually at the beginning of each season)
        • Small presses / niche publishers get to see only one buyer for all subjects
        • Need to persevere and have at least a few good trade titles to get to subject buyers
        • For each title need to submit a “new buy sheet” (in paper)
        • Present titles 3 to 6 months in advance
    • The Retail Market: Barnes & Noble (ctd.)
      • Academic stores (around 30)
        • Separate buyers, same process
      • Academic / text services
        • No brick and mortar stores, only fulfill textbook orders by universities
      • Online store:
        • Need to provide metadata, upload digital covers for each title
        • Sales usually much lower than Amazon.com
    • Screenshot Barnes&Noble Publisher & Author Guidelines
    • The Retail Market: Others
      • Borders Inc. (HQ in Ann Arbor, Michigan)
        • Buys for US, Latin American, and Asian stores
      • Follets
        • Mainly academic stores (e.g. Stanford University)
        • Also provide text book services to universities
      • Other independently run university book stores (e.g. NYU)
      • Powell’s
      • Independent Bookstores:
        • E.g., Politics and Prose, Olsson’s, Cody’s, Modern Times
      • For online stores, particularly amazon, see separate session
    • Sales Representatives (“Reps”)
      • Sales reps are a good option to cover the retail (also call on wholesalers)
      • Call on all stores, including national chains
      • Biannual sales conference to present new titles, sales kit VERY important (blurb, key selling points, cross-marketing opportunities, audience, recommended stores, etc…).
      • Commission anywhere from 5 to 10% depending on customer (no commission on text book orders)
    • Distributors
      • The distributor should sell direct and to the trade, and do marketing. For publishers based outside the US he should also do fulfillment and keep adequate stock.
      • Downsides:
        • An additional intermediary reduces margins for publishers
        • Marketing efforts have to be spread across other publishers distributed
        • Risk that he does not cover the retail market well
      • Upsides:
        • Lower operational costs for publishers
        • Cross marketing opportunities with other lists
      • Active North American distributors include NBN, RENOUF, BERNAN, Stylus, Boskage, etc….
    • Important Events and Meetings
      • Book Expo America
        • Strong trade focus, less relevant for academic market
      • Meetings of
        • ALA (American Library Association)
        • SLA (Special Libraries Association)
        • ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)
      • Co-Operative stands are a good option to attend the above meetings plus other more specialized ones
    • Useful Links
      • Baker and Taylor Publisher’s Services
      • http://www.btol.com/inf_details.cfm?id=193
      • Ingram Publisher’s Services
      • http://www.ingrampublisherservices.com
      • Blackwell’s Publishers Information
      • http://www.blackwell.com/publisher_information
      • Barnes and Noble Information for Publishers
      • http://www.barnesandnobleinc.com/for_publishers/for_publishers.html
      • Borders Information for Publishers & Artist
      • http://www.bordersgroupinc.com/artists/publishers.htm