Informing the public about immunisation by Jo Yarwood - Department of Health

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Informing the public about immunisation by Jo Yarwood - Department of Health

  1. 1. Informing the public about immunisation Jo Yarwood Department of Health
  2. 2. Frighten them – make them feel guilty!
  3. 3. Amuse/alarm them!
  4. 4. Congratulate and engage them
  5. 5. But first, find out what they think •tracking •health professionals •parents •strategic •developmental •pre-testing •evaluation
  6. 6. Perceived severity of diseaseHalf considered swine flu to be very serious. Little change in perceived severity ofother diseases over time for parents of 0-2s. 95% 95% 97% 95% 93% 93% 93% 92% 92% 91% Meningitis Septicaemia Pneumonia Polio Swine flu 51% Diphtheria Rubella * Tetanus 28% 28% 27% 27% 29% Hib 23% 24% 24% 19% 21% Measles MumpsNov 00 Nov 01 Nov 02 Nov 03 Nov 04 Nov 05 Nov 06 Nov 07 Nov 08 Feb 10 Base: Parents of 0-2s - 2010 (1142), previous years c.1000
  7. 7. Are immunisations safe?The swine flu vaccine is the main concern for parents now, with MMR on a par with others in terms of perceived safety 86% Slight risk 83% 83% 83% 82% 81% 81% Completely safe 79% 78% 68% 58% 48% 51% 52% 52% 51% 49% 46% 46% 29%Pre-school 2nd dose 5 in 1 Seasonal flu TB Men C MMR Pneumo Hib/Men C Swine flu booster MMR vaccine Base: 2010 - parents of 0-4s (1730)
  8. 8. Satisfaction with the immunisation processOverall levels of satisfaction are high. Parents are least likely to be totally satisfied with gettinginformation prior to the visit and how side effects are dealt with. Parents aged 16-24 were less satisfied, both overall and with getting information. Totally satisfied 41% 49% 66% 58% Fairly satisfied 69% Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied 36% Fairly dissatisfied 33% 33% 26% 10% 25% Very dissatisfied 8% 11% 3% 4% 4% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 2% 1% Getting information Making the The immunisation visit* How any side effects The immunisation before the appointment* were dealt with after process as a whole immunisation was due the visit* No differences Base: 2010 - parents of 0-4s by age of child
  9. 9. What influences them?
  10. 10. Wakefield AJ et al 1998 The Lancet 351: 637-41 “We did not prove an associationbetween measles, mumps and rubella and the syndrome described.”
  11. 11. MMR uptake at 16 months and proportion ofmothers believing in complete or almost complete safety of MMR vaccine Crohn’s paper Autism paper Sustained negative media reportage 90 80 MMR uptake % % mothers confident 70 60 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 -9 -9 -9 -9 -9 -9 -0 -0 -0 -0 pr pr pr pr pr pr pr pr pr pr A A A A A A A A A A Thanks to Professor Brent Taylor
  12. 12. TimesDailyMirror Daily Telegraph Daily Star
  13. 13. Attitudes towards vaccination• parents of 8 – 10 year old children (2005)• parents of 11 – 12 year old girls (2007)• 11 – 12 year girls (2007)• health professionals (2007)• ongoing developmental work (e.g. advertising)• pre-testing• evaluation
  14. 14. But . . . expect the unexpected• most girls didn’t know where their cervix was, and wherever it was, they certainly didn’t want the injection there! (The campaign strapline ‘arm against cervical cancer’ went a long way towards allaying this fear).• you can include too much information in a leaflet. Keep it short and clear. Use other platforms for more detailed information such a factsheet, Q&A and website.• layout and design of materials can make a big difference; we tested two leaflets with same text but different layout – some girls thought the content was different.
  15. 15. LeafletAbout fitness
  16. 16. Does communication matter?• 2008, Romania introduced an HPV vaccine programme• programme not supported by communications• cohort of 111,000, low acceptance• limited uptake to 2,615 doses• current plans in Romania – • implement an information campaign and then • re-launch the programme
  17. 17. What do parents want?• clarity• consistency• facts• openness• range of information/resources
  18. 18. Who do parents talk to?Most parents discussed 0-2s immunisations with a HP, but less so for 3-4s. HV in particular much less used by parents of 3-4s Any HV GP PN Midwife 85% 80% 79% 78% 79% 77% 77% 76% 74% 74% 13% 14% 13% 15% 15% 11% 10% 12% 9% 9% Nov 00 Nov 01 Nov 02 Nov 03 Nov 04 Nov 05 Nov 06 Nov 07 Nov 08 Feb 10 Base: Parents of 0-2s - 2010 (1142), previous years c.1000
  19. 19. Who do parents trust?Health professionals and the NHS remain the most trusted sources of advice on immunisation.Parents recognise that family and friends may not give them the most accurate information. GP, HV or PN 54% 92% NHS 42% 86% No Pharmacist 19% 66% difference by age of child Government 18% 58% Family/friends 14% 49% Strongly agree Slightly agree Media 4% 21% Base: 2010 - parents of 0-4s (1730)
  20. 20. "The irony of the Information Age is that it has given new respectability to uninformed opinion". John Lawson (reporter) to the American Association of Broadcast Journalists (1995).

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