Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Jung by Anthony Storr
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Jung by Anthony Storr

3,186

Published on

The presentation of the book 'Jung' by Anthony Storr.

The presentation of the book 'Jung' by Anthony Storr.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,186
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Jung<br />By:<br />Anthony Storr<br />Presented by:<br />Mehdi Hassanian esfahani GS22456<br />July 2009 - UPM<br />Storr, Anthony. Jung. Fontana: Great Britain, 1979.<br />
  • 2. Chapter 1 (the personal background)<br />Carl Gustav Jung was born July 26th, 1875.<br />
  • 3. Chapter 1 (the personal background)<br />Carl Gustav Jung was born July 26th, 1875.<br />His father was kind, tolerant and liberal, conventional to accept system of religious belief =&gt; weak, powerless.<br />
  • 4. Chapter 1 (the personal background)<br />Carl Gustav Jung was born July 26th, 1875.<br />His father was kind, tolerant and liberal, conventional to accept system of religious belief =&gt; weak, powerless.<br />His mother was more powerful & dynamic figure. Mother? two personality (12) problematic, moody, hospitalized (marriage problems). (7) <br />
  • 5. Chapter 1 (the personal background)<br />Carl Gustav Jung was born July 26th, 1875.<br />His father was kind, tolerant and liberal, conventional to accept system of religious belief =&gt; weak, powerless.<br />His mother was more powerful & dynamic figure. Mother? two personality (12) problematic, moody, hospitalized (marriage problems). (7) <br />Jung was concert with the efforts of the developing personality to extricate itself from the toils of maternal encirclement. (8)<br />
  • 6. Chapter 1 (the personal background)<br />Carl Gustav Jung was born July 26th, 1875.<br />His father was kind, tolerant and liberal, conventional to accept system of religious belief =&gt; weak, powerless.<br />His mother was more powerful & dynamic figure. Mother? two personality (12) problematic, moody, hospitalized (marriage problems). (7) <br />Jung was concert with the efforts of the developing personality to extricate itself from the toils of maternal encirclement. (8)<br />A good deal of Jungian psychology can be seen as part of Jung’s attempt to find a substitute for the orthodox faith in which he was reared.<br />
  • 7. Chapter 1 (the personal background)<br />Carl Gustav Jung was born July 26th, 1875.<br />His father was kind, tolerant and liberal, conventional to accept system of religious belief =&gt; weak, powerless.<br />His mother was more powerful & dynamic figure. Mother? two personality (12) problematic, moody, hospitalized (marriage problems). (7) <br />Jung was concert with the efforts of the developing personality to extricate itself from the toils of maternal encirclement. (8)<br />A good deal of Jungian psychology can be seen as part of Jung’s attempt to find a substitute for the orthodox faith in which he was reared.<br />Jung’s mental hospital experience continued from 1900 to 1909 when he resigned to pursue his private psychotherapeutic practice. (16)<br />
  • 8. Chapter 1 (the personal background)<br />Freud undoubtedly attributed supreme value to the organic release of sex, whereas Jung found supreme value in the unifying experience of religion. Hence Freud tended to interpret all numinous and emotionally significant experience as derived from or substitute for sex: whereas Jung tended to interpret even sexuality itself as symbolic; possessing ‘numinous’ significance, in that it represented an irrational union of opposites, and was thus a symbol of wholeness (19).<br />
  • 9. Chapter 2 (Jung’s early work)<br />his need? reconcile ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ (25).<br />
  • 10. Chapter 2 (Jung’s early work)<br />his need? reconcile ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ (25).<br />Objective: word-association test (19th century: they wanted to study the way in which mental contents are linked together by similarity, contrast or contiguity in space and time…another usage? detecting emotional preoccupations) (25) If husband & wife / mother & daughter have identical responses to stimulus words: not a healthy state of affair &gt; one or both of the parties had failed to attain sufficient individuality. (26)<br />
  • 11. Chapter 2 (Jung’s early work)<br />his need? reconcile ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ (25).<br />Objective: word-association test (19th century: they wanted to study the way in which mental contents are linked together by similarity, contrast or contiguity in space and time…another usage? detecting emotional preoccupations) (25) If husband & wife / mother & daughter have identical responses to stimulus words: not a healthy state of affair &gt; one or both of the parties had failed to attain sufficient individuality. (26)<br />complex: is a collection of associations linked together by the same feeling-tone. when complexes are touched upon, the person concerned shows evidence of emotional disturbance.(27) they show the dynamic effects of forgotten, ‘repressed’ mental contents (28).<br />
  • 12. Chapter 2 (Jung’s early work)<br />his need? reconcile ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ (25).<br />Objective: word-association test (19th century: they wanted to study the way in which mental contents are linked together by similarity, contrast or contiguity in space and time…another usage? detecting emotional preoccupations) (25) If husband & wife / mother & daughter have identical responses to stimulus words: not a healthy state of affair &gt; one or both of the parties had failed to attain sufficient individuality. (26)<br />complex: is a collection of associations linked together by the same feeling-tone. when complexes are touched upon, the person concerned shows evidence of emotional disturbance.(27) they show the dynamic effects of forgotten, ‘repressed’ mental contents (28).<br />Subjective study: his experience at Burgholzli … came to realize the psychotic fantasies (phantasies) were very similar to dreams.<br />
  • 13. Chapter 2 (Jung’s early work)<br />his need? reconcile ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ (25).<br />Objective: word-association test (19th century: they wanted to study the way in which mental contents are linked together by similarity, contrast or contiguity in space and time…another usage? detecting emotional preoccupations) (25) If husband & wife / mother & daughter have identical responses to stimulus words: not a healthy state of affair &gt; one or both of the parties had failed to attain sufficient individuality. (26)<br />complex: is a collection of associations linked together by the same feeling-tone. when complexes are touched upon, the person concerned shows evidence of emotional disturbance.(27) they show the dynamic effects of forgotten, ‘repressed’ mental contents (28).<br />Subjective study: his experience at Burgholzli … came to realize the psychotic fantasies (phantasies) were very similar to dreams.<br />collective unconscious: a myth creative level of mind. (35)<br />
  • 14. Chapter 2 (Jung’s early work)<br />keystone of Jungian thought: 1.there was experimental confirmation for his notion that the mind was, or could be, divided into different parts which he tended to personify. 2. the idea occurred to him that there was a substratum of mind common to all men which was the source of mythological, cosmogonic notion. 3. he conceived that this mythological material has a positive function in giving meaning and significance to man’s existence; perhaps as a compensation for his actual insignificance., just as the grandiose delusions of schizophrenics compensated for their failure in life. 4. the idea that such material was not only compensatory, but prospective; that is, forward-looking in its application. A myth might be an attempt on the part of the mind itself as self-healing: that is, at creating a better adaptation in the future. 5. this point of view implied that not all dreams, phantasies and similar material could be interpreted in term of the subject’s infantile past, as Freud would have it. Nor could it be maintained that the creative energy of the mind –the libido- was wholly sexual. Whilst hysterical neuroses were generally connected with a sexual disturbance, schizophrenia was concerned with a more general failure in adaption to external reality. The connection between the inner world of the subject and his whole view of the external world could not be thought of as merely a sexual phenomenon. (38)<br />
  • 15. Chapter 3 (archetype and the collective unconscious)<br />archetype – anima – animus (positive and negative points)<br />
  • 16. Chapter 3 (archetype and the collective unconscious)<br />archetype – anima – animus (positive and negative points)<br />shadow: In dreams of Europeans, the shadow habitually appears as a figure of the same sex as the dreamer, but usually dark-skinned, ‘devilish, or in some sense felt to be evil. (58)<br />
  • 17. Chapter 3 (archetype and the collective unconscious)<br />archetype – anima – animus (positive and negative points)<br />shadow: In dreams of Europeans, the shadow habitually appears as a figure of the same sex as the dreamer, but usually dark-skinned, ‘devilish, or in some sense felt to be evil. (58)<br />wise old man: represents ‘the factor of intelligence and knowledge’ or ‘superior insight’ (but it is not obvious, from Jung’s account, in what way this figure differs from the father-figure, or even from the image of God) (59-60) [it may be the second personality in each one, who helps during problems in dreams and so, when you get hints from above conscious – what Jung experienced himself.]<br />
  • 18. Chapter 3 (archetype and the collective unconscious)<br />archetype – anima – animus (positive and negative points)<br />shadow: In dreams of Europeans, the shadow habitually appears as a figure of the same sex as the dreamer, but usually dark-skinned, ‘devilish, or in some sense felt to be evil. (58)<br />wise old man: represents ‘the factor of intelligence and knowledge’ or ‘superior insight’ (but it is not obvious, from Jung’s account, in what way this figure differs from the father-figure, or even from the image of God) (59-60) [it may be the second personality in each one, who helps during problems in dreams and so, when you get hints from above conscious – what Jung experienced himself.]<br />persona: term derived from the Latin for the mask assumed by the actors, and is used by Jung to designate the role played by an individual in accordance with the expectations of society, as opposed to what the person is in reality … The persona is sometimes contrasted with the shadow, anima or animus. (60)<br />
  • 19. Chapter 4 (psychological types, and the self-regulating psyche)<br />The unconscious is compensatory (67) [Jung was criticized for this].<br />
  • 20. Chapter 4 (psychological types, and the self-regulating psyche)<br />The unconscious is compensatory (67) [Jung was criticized for this].<br />Since the time of the physiologist Claude Bernard, scientists have been perfectly used to accepting the idea that the body is the self-regulating entity. … in psychology, the tendency to seek equilibrium is known as ‘homeostasis’. (69)<br />
  • 21. Chapter 4 (psychological types, and the self-regulating psyche)<br />The unconscious is compensatory (67) [Jung was criticized for this].<br />Since the time of the physiologist Claude Bernard, scientists have been perfectly used to accepting the idea that the body is the self-regulating entity. … in psychology, the tendency to seek equilibrium is known as ‘homeostasis’. (69)<br />left, in Jungian terminology, is the side of unconscious. (79)<br />
  • 22. Chapter 5 (the process of individuation)<br />Mandalas seemed to symbolize his achievement of a new balance within his own psyche; a balance in which there was some reconciliation between the opposite forces (the journey called the process of individuation; whereas mandala patterns symbolized a new center within the psyche, which was neither conscious nor unconscious but partook of both, and called Self) (81)<br />
  • 23. Chapter 5 (the process of individuation)<br />individuation takes place in the second half of life, and it is an esoteric process which engages only the few (not all people). (81) It is appropriate only in those cases where consciousness has reached an abnormal degree of development and has diverged too far from the unconscious. This is the sine qua non of the process. Nothing would be more wrong than to open this way to neurotics who are ill on account of an excessive predominance of the unconscious. For the same reason, this way of development has scarcely any meaning before the middle of life (normally between the ages of 35 and 40), and if entered upon too soon can be decidedly injurious (82)<br />
  • 24. Chapter 5 (the process of individuation)<br />Psychoanalysis has always been chiefly concerned with neurotics who in Jung’s phrase, suffer from ‘an excessive predominance of the unconscious’ or to say the same thing in different words, suffer from a weak ego. (82)<br />
  • 25. Chapter 5 (the process of individuation)<br />Psychoanalysis has always been chiefly concerned with neurotics who in Jung’s phrase, suffer from ‘an excessive predominance of the unconscious’ or to say the same thing in different words, suffer from a weak ego. (82)<br />In Jung’s view, the individual’s task during the first half of life was to establish himself in the world, sever the childhood ties which bound him to his parents, gain himself a mate, and start a new family (what Jung called ‘fulfilling one’s obligations’) (83)<br />
  • 26. Chapter 5 (the process of individuation)<br />Psychoanalysis has always been chiefly concerned with neurotics who in Jung’s phrase, suffer from ‘an excessive predominance of the unconscious’ or to say the same thing in different words, suffer from a weak ego. (82)<br />In Jung’s view, the individual’s task during the first half of life was to establish himself in the world, sever the childhood ties which bound him to his parents, gain himself a mate, and start a new family (what Jung called ‘fulfilling one’s obligations’) (83)<br />Jung constantly reiterated that Freudian psychology, or Adlerian for that matter, were perfectly applicable to the problems of most young persons. (and not satisfactory for problems of the second half of life) (83)<br />
  • 27. Chapter 5 (the process of individuation)<br />Psychoanalysis has always been chiefly concerned with neurotics who in Jung’s phrase, suffer from ‘an excessive predominance of the unconscious’ or to say the same thing in different words, suffer from a weak ego. (82)<br />In Jung’s view, the individual’s task during the first half of life was to establish himself in the world, sever the childhood ties which bound him to his parents, gain himself a mate, and start a new family (what Jung called ‘fulfilling one’s obligations’) (83)<br />Jung constantly reiterated that Freudian psychology, or Adlerian for that matter, were perfectly applicable to the problems of most young persons. (and not satisfactory for problems of the second half of life) (83)<br />In Jungian terms, the tasks of the first half of life are symbolized by the mythologem [=A mythological is a single element or motif within the mythology] of the hero. (84)<br />
  • 28. Chapter 5 (the process of individuation)<br />supreme value for Adlerians? power / Freudians? sex / Jungians? the integration, or ‘wholeness’ (86-7) The person who has achieved this goal possesses, in Jung’s words, ‘an attitude that is beyond the reach of emotional entanglements and violent shocks – a consciousness detached from the world’ (87) In Jung’s view, such an attitude, achieved only in the second half of life, is a preparation for death. (87) <br />
  • 29. Chapter 6 (the concept of the Self)<br />In Freud’s view, religion should and could be replaced by science. In Jung’s belief, this was quite impossible. Man had always needed, and would continue to require, some kind of religion or myth by which to live …. The soul must contain in itself the faculty of relation to God, i.e. the correspondence, otherwise a connection could never come about. This correspondence is, in psychological term, the archetype of the God-image. (97)<br />
  • 30. Chapter 6 (the concept of the Self)<br />In Freud’s view, religion should and could be replaced by science. In Jung’s belief, this was quite impossible. Man had always needed, and would continue to require, some kind of religion or myth by which to live …. The soul must contain in itself the faculty of relation to God, i.e. the correspondence, otherwise a connection could never come about. This correspondence is, in psychological term, the archetype of the God-image. (97)<br />He does seem to have believed that his visions, dreams and phantasies were direct revelations from God. He once said, referring to dreams, ‘Every night, one has the chance of the Eucharist’. (101)<br />
  • 31. Chapter 6 (the concept of the Self)<br />In Freud’s view, religion should and could be replaced by science. In Jung’s belief, this was quite impossible. Man had always needed, and would continue to require, some kind of religion or myth by which to live …. The soul must contain in itself the faculty of relation to God, i.e. the correspondence, otherwise a connection could never come about. This correspondence is, in psychological term, the archetype of the God-image. (97)<br />He does seem to have believed that his visions, dreams and phantasies were direct revelations from God. He once said, referring to dreams, ‘Every night, one has the chance of the Eucharist’. (101)<br />[in works of arts] form, as well as content, is largely determined by unconscious forces. (102)<br />
  • 32. Chapter 6 (the concept of the Self)<br />The production of mandala patterns became for Jung a symbolic expression of having reached a new synthesis within himself, a conjunction of conscious and unconscious, of phantasy and external reality, of thought and feeling. Because this experience was so intensively important to him, he felt obliged t o describe it in religious terms and so the mandalas became a kind of symbolic representation of the archetype of God. (102)<br />
  • 33. Chapter 6 (the concept of the Self)<br />Jung, in describing the process of individuation and the reconciling of opposites was calling attention to a symbolic process of healing which is of great importance and interest … He referred to religion as psychotherapeutic system. He might equally well have used the same phrase about works of art. (104)<br />
  • 34. Chapter 6 (the concept of the Self)<br />Jung, in describing the process of individuation and the reconciling of opposites was calling attention to a symbolic process of healing which is of great importance and interest … He referred to religion as psychotherapeutic system. He might equally well have used the same phrase about works of art. (104)<br />One rather odd consequence of Jung’s preoccupation with the union of the opposites is his notion of synchronicity. Throughout his life, Jung was preoccupied with what he called ‘meaningful coincidences’, and, as we have seen, with the relation between the inner world of the psyche and the external world. (105)<br />
  • 35. Chapter 7 (Jung’s contribution to psychotherapy)<br />People find Jung difficult to grasp. As he said ‘Nobody reads my books’ and ‘I have such a hell of a trouble to make people see what I mean.’ (106)<br />
  • 36. Chapter 7 (Jung’s contribution to psychotherapy)<br />People find Jung difficult to grasp. As he said ‘Nobody reads my books’ and ‘I have such a hell of a trouble to make people see what I mean.’ (106)<br />Jung regarded the language of dreams as a natural, symbolic language which might be difficult to understand, but which was not an attempt to conceal anything. (109)<br />
  • 37. Chapter 7 (Jung’s contribution to psychotherapy)<br />People find Jung difficult to grasp. As he said ‘Nobody reads my books’ and ‘I have such a hell of a trouble to make people see what I mean.’ (106)<br />Jung regarded the language of dreams as a natural, symbolic language which might be difficult to understand, but which was not an attempt to conceal anything. (109)<br />‘amplification’: Jung’s practice of supplying analogies and comparisons. (111)<br />
  • 38. Chapter 7 (Jung’s contribution to psychotherapy)<br />Unlike Freud, Jung understood the difference between a sign and a symbol. ... Freud alleged that all weapons and tools are used as symbols for the male organ, he might equally well have used the word ‘sign’ instead of symbol. In Jung’s view, a symbol was more than this. A true symbol always possesses overtones, so that its full significance cannot be grasped intellectually, at least immediately. If it becomes fully definable in rational terms, it is no longer a living symbol. ex? Christian Cross for St. Paul and for the early mystics, the Cross stood for something which could not be clearly defined, but which was of immense importance. As time went on, the Cross no longer bore the same significance. … A work of art is a true symbol in Jungian sense, in that it is pregnant with meaning, (112) partakes of both ‘conscious’ and ‘unconscious’ and yet cannot be sharply defined in purely intellectual terms. (113)<br />
  • 39. Chapter 7 (Jung’s contribution to psychotherapy)<br />Jung was more particularly interested in the kind of phantasy which comes to people when they are neither awake nor asleep, but in a state of reverie in which judgment is suspended, but consciousness is not lost. (115-116)<br />
  • 40. Thank You<br />

×