Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Mhatta hitotsubashi-20120221
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Mhatta hitotsubashi-20120221

207
views

Published on

Published in: Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
207
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Two modes of Product Development Head-oriented vs. Release-oriented Masayuki Hatta Faculty of Economics, Surugadai University [email_address] [email_address] @Tokyo OSS Workshop, hit-u Feb. 21, 2012
  • 2. Observations
    • Sometimes (software development) projects succeed
      • Gaining more users, popularity, developers
    • Sometimes projects fail
      • Losing more users, popularity, developers
  • 3. What's the difference?
    • Not promising?
      • Initial design flawed?
    • Developers not competent enough?
    • 4. No demands?
  • 5. How about the Linux kernel?
    • Not so promising at first
      • Tanenbaum vs. Torvalds dispute (1992)
      • 6. Not promising == not attracting developers/users
    • There are (better?) competitors in the F/OSS world
      • GNU/Hurd(promising architecture)
      • 7. *BSD(looser licensing)
  • 8. Linx is not rare case
    • e.g. KDE vs. GNOME
    • 9. Some projects suddenly gain momentum
    • 10. Some projects suddenly lose momentum
  • 11. Hypothesis
    • Mismatches between user/developer expectation?
      • User preference might be changed as time goes by
  • 12. Hypothesis
    • There seems to be two different “modes” of Software development
      • I call them “Release-oriented” and “Head-oriented”
    • Made it possible by technological advances (== lowering communication costs)
  • 13. Release-oriented
  • 14. Release-oriented
    • With QA(Quality Assuarance)
      • QA works don't add new features
      • 15. QA is boring, believe me
    • Stable(not so buggy, secure, etc), but not cutting-edge
    • 16. Good for stable environment
    • 17. Basically for users who appreciate “usable” projects
    • 18. Most products go this way
  • 19. Head-oriented
  • 20. Head-oriented
    • Continuously developed
      • No release, just “snapshots”
      • 21. “always beta” (O'Reilley 2008)
    • e.g. Wikipedia
    • 22. Users & developers share the same codebase
      • Version Control System
    • Good for rapidly changing environment
    • 23. For developers(and advanced users)
  • 24. Release vs. Head
    • Surely there are hybrid release pattern
  • 25. F/OSS development dilemma
    • Gaining momentum
    • 26. Gaining new users
    • 27. New users(e.g. Corporate users) appreciate stable releases
    • 28. Developers appreciate cutting-edge snapshots
    • 29. Conflict!
  • 30. KDE4 case (2008)
    • KDE4 was released in 2008
    • 31. Developers love it
      • A lots of new ambitious features
    • Users don't love it
      • Unstable, buggy
      • 32. However, KDE3 was also buggy
    • Release manager in trouble
  • 33. Other possible cases
    • Dead-line based release (Michlmayr 2009)
    • 34. Linux kernel?
      • Changed release pattern
    • Debian
      • vs. Ubuntu
    • Mozilla?
      • vs. Gnome Chrome
      • 35. Is there still “community” development?
        • Limited N of developers employed by limited N of corporations
  • 36. Further research
    • Is this only a change in software development?
      • e.g. Democratized innovation (von Hippel 2005)
      • 37. e.g. Open Hardware
      • 38. e.g. 3D printing
  • 39. Extra...
  • 40. FLOSS Survey 2012(or 2013)?
    • Almost 10 years since FLOSS Survey (2003)
    • 41. It would be nice if we could do it again this year (or next)
      • Comparision should be very interesting
    • I'm trying to convince FSF hosts it
    • 42. I'll talk at LibrePlanet 2012
  • 43. Thanks for listening [email_address] http://about.me/mhatta Twitter: @mhatta (in Japanese) Twitter: @masayukihatta (in English)

×