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Google Policy Primer 2013
 

Google Policy Primer 2013

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NET303 Policy Primer on Google and new Terms of Service and Privacy Policy

NET303 Policy Primer on Google and new Terms of Service and Privacy Policy

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  • @lucidimagery

    Hi! Adam,

    How are you today? Thank you for your comments. I appreciated your point comparing subscription fees versus free service. Including concerns for privacy relating to Google’s “free with advertising” model (Mitchell, 2009). It is quite a scary thought that we “become the product” (Goodson, 2012). Makes you wonder how much we could be changed, rearranged, tweaked and discarded! It is interesting to note deviantART collects user information anonymously for advertisers. This proves your point on restrictions for subscriber sites on the use of personal information, compared to free services like Google. I agree users are linked in many ways to Google through other companies terms. Francesca found an alternative service called Opera. However, I found in Opera’s Privacy statement there is a clause on transfer. “Opera software cooperates with Google, Inc (“Google”)” (Opera, 2013). For example, as part of Opera privacy policy contract users are also subject to Google’s privacy policy.

    When you see the Gmail case I do hope as you do that our information is treated securely and with respect. However, Google has already lost the trust of thousands or even millions of users due to the Gmail case. Another example is the NSA spying on international leaders and people in general. If trust is broken it is very hard to believe they will respect and secure our personal and private information. There is one thought arising from this debate, if the majority of the people around the world believe in God and that He sees all and they accept this as an unavoidable truth and act appropriately, why would people care what man or machine sees? If there was a competitor of Google’s that came in the market place that offered similar free services, not linked to Google in any way and placed more restrictions as deviantART does, would you change over or stay with Google? If you decided to use both, how would your search habits change?

    Reference

    Goodson, S. (2012). If You’re Not Paying For It, You Become The Product. Retrieved November 04, 2013, from http://www.forbes.com/sites/marketshare/2012/03/05/if-youre-not-paying-for-it-you-become-the-product/

    Mitchell, R. (2009). What Google knows about you. Retrieved November 04, 2013, from http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/337791/What_Google_Knows_About_You

    O’Connor, A. (2013). Net 303 Policy Primer Terms of Service of DeviantART. [Presentation]. Curtin University. Retrieved November 04, 2013, from http://www.slideshare.net/lucidimagery/net303-policy-primer-27396546

    Opera. (2013). Privacy Policy. Retrieved October 31, 2013, from http://opera.com/privacy/
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  • @jhexpress

    Hi! Judith,

    Thank you for your great comments about my policy primer on Google. Greatly appreciated. It is very difficult to navigate online without agreeing to terms by default too. Further research found “users are generally unaware and/or unconcerned with protecting their privacy on social networking sites” (Goettke & Christiana, 2007, p. 9). Or people are fairly concerned but do not do anything about it. This is partly why as you point out Ms Arnold was able to be recognised by her search words and phrases. Francesca researched an alternative to Google search and that was Opera. As we both discovered Opera users are subject to the same Google privacy policy.

    For further interest as discussed with Francesca, all of our information is gathered and monitored. According to Lawrence (2013, para. 1) the “NSA has ‘direct access’ to the systems of the majority of the most popular online services on the planet, including Google (including YouTube), Facebook, Hotmail, Yahoo!, Apple and Skype.” This allows “the NSAs PRISM to access your content in real-time and share this information with foreign powers” (K. Murphy, personal communication, October 31, 2013). Therefore, questions arise, whether it is inevitable all our information will be made accessible due to evolving technologies and in the end would we really mind?

    Reference

    Goettke, R., & Christiana, J. (2007). Privacy and Online Social Networking Websites. Computer Science 199r: Special Topics in Computer Science Computation and Society: Privacy and Technology. Retrieved September 14, 2013, from http://www.eecs.harvard.edu/cs199r/fp/RichJoe.pdf

    Lawrence, Jon. (2013, May 28). Conroy calls for transparency on s313 website blocking. Electronic Frontiers Australia. Retrieved September 13, 2013, from https://www.efa.org.au/2013/05/28/conroy-transparency-on-s313/
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  • Hi Kylie,

    Thank you for your policy primer on Google Kylie, it was very informative. As Google is such a major player on the Internet it was interesting to see some of the key terms of service. I am interested in the balance Google tries to keep by affording certain protections to users private information on one hand, while at the same time using that information to generate income through its various advertising techniques. Google offers most of its services like YouTube and Google+ and its search engine for free and generates revenue through advertising placed within those services. Google is increasingly using users private information that it gathers from across its range of services, to target users with specific types of advertising. While this seems to be a fairly straightforward way of increasing advertising revenue, many users are obviously not that happy about their information being used in this manner.

    For my policy primer I chose Deviantart (http://www.slideshare.net/lucidimagery/net303-policy-primer-27396546), who are able to generate much of their revenue through subscription fees. I feel this partly explains why there are such concerns about privacy with Google, who rely more on users privacy information to generate income and therefore have has less restrictions on how they use that private information. The Google, “free with advertising” model is much more invasive in that it collects user activity, such as search queries, clicked links and location, to target users with specific advertising (Mitchell, 2009). An interesting theory around this model states, “If you’re not paying for it, you become the product”(Goodson, 2012) While Deviantart does collect such information it is done anonymously without any links back to individual users and the data is used only to inform advertisers of general user habits and to “improve the offerings and performance of the site” (Deviantart Privacy, 2013). As it is very difficult to participate on the Internet without using Google’s pervasive services, most of us are now more or less beholden to Google’s recently combined (Mills, 2012) terms of service whether we like it or not. One can only hope that Google treats our information both securely and with respect, as it would be very difficult to opt out of all Google owned services.

    Adam O’Connor


    Deviantart: Privacy. (2013) Deviantart: Privacy Policy. Retrieved from
    http://about.deviantart.com/policy/privacy/

    Goodson, S. (2012) If You’re Not Paying For It, You Become The Product. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/marketshare/2012/03/05/if-youre-not-paying-for-it-you-become-the-product/

    Mills, E. (2012) Google wants ability to ‘combine’ your user data. Retrieved from http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-57365195-281/google-wants-ability-to-combine-your-user-data/

    Mitchell, R. (2009) What Google knows about you. Retrieved from http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/337791/What_Google_Knows_About_You
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  • Thank you Kylie,
    Your presentation was great!
    The format and the use of brand colour were exceptional.
    Your analysis on the issues surrounding privacy is paramount.
    Further there is little chance of maintaining anonymity if this is one of the benefits that first coaxed you into online sharing.

    As noted by Barbaro and Zeller information gathered from online behaviour can easily be added to other data to provide a comprehensive profile of the person.
    No 4417749 otherwise known as Ms Arnold was recognised by her search words and phrases (2006) however Google takes this a step further scanning email content (Murphy,2013).

    Barbaro, M., & Zeller, T. (2006, August 9th). A Face Is Exposed for AOL Searcher No. 4417749. New York Times: Retrieved October 10, 2013 from http://w2.eff.org/Privacy/AOL/exhibit_d.pdf
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  • Hi Kylie

    Thanks for posting a well written and researched policy primer on Google. It is probably the most important privacy policy which needs to be monitored by its users because so many people use it's services.

    The area of particular interest to me is the scanning of emails. It is a source of personal iritation to see advertising which targets me based on the contents of my emails. I notice it time and again that I see ads which relate to keys words from my emails. Even though it is a ro[bot] scanning my email and not a real person - I still find this is an invasion of my privacy.

    Thanks again for an informative policy primer.
    Jennifer
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    Google Policy Primer 2013 Google Policy Primer 2013 Presentation Transcript

    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 NET 303 New Privacy & Terms November 11, 2013 (Slatten, 2010). POLICY PRIMER Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 1
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 Google states, “We are committed to improving your security, protecting your privacy, and building simple tools to give you choice and control.” (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University How??? (CyberApps, 2013). 2
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 provides their Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for you to stay safe and secure online.(Slatten, 2010). “Google helps to protect you, your computer and the Internet from cybercrime.” By using Google Services, “you are agreeing to these terms.” Including any changes or additional terms that come into effect. (Google, 2013). (Ms. Smith, 2010). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University (Google, 2013). (Villasenor, 2013). 3
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 If you have used any of Products and Services like Web Search Chrome Drive Scholar Calendar YouTube (Surf Context, 2010). (Slatten, 2010). Google Play News Translate Mobile (Google+, Wallet and Offers) Android (Google Maps) (Google, 2013). You have accepted Google’s terms of service. Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 4
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 The Terms of Service users agree to consist of: Ownership and intellectual property Copyright and privacy protections Responsibilities Reason for account suspension or termination Software rights Modification or termination of services Disclaimer Liability Business indemnity Jurisdiction Additional terms and changes New terms as of 11/11/13 Shared endorsements Mobile devices Passwords (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 5
    • NET303 Politics & Power (Slatten, 2010). SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 ‘s New Privacy & Terms go live November 11, 2013 There are 3 changes: 1. Your profile name and photo may appear in reviews and advertising. 2. Reminder to use your mobile devices safely. 3. Details on the importance of keeping your password confidential. (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 6
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 The Privacy Terms users agree to consist of: Information collected -Personal information -Use of services How information collected is used Deletion of personal information Information Google shares Information security Application Transparency and choice Enforcement Information shared between users Changes (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 7
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 What do the Terms of Service mean? You retain intellectual property rights of your content. Content is your sole responsibility. If your content is illegal or violates Google’s terms it is removed and you may face legal consequences. Copyright infringement results in the termination of your account under “US Digital Millennium Copyright Act” (Google, 2012). This stops you accessing your account, files and emails. (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 8
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 What do the Terms of Service mean? Google can use, reproduce, modify, host, store, publish or distribute your content. Google can use your information to develop new products without paying you. Google offers no commitment to reliability, or availability of their services. If you do not agree with Google’s TOS you can discontinue using the service. (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 9
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 What do the Terms of Service mean? Google administration requires users to be over 13 years and to verify by providing your birth date, otherwise the account is suspended and disabled (Google, 2013). COPPA (1998) does not allow personally identifiable information of a minor to be collected. Ages between 13 and 17 require parental consent (The Meyer Brown Practices, 2013). You can “now control whether your image and name appear in ads via the shared endorsements setting” and permits you to opt-out of the new program (Google, 2013). Under 18’s will not appear on endorsement ads. Google expects you to use mobile devices safely when driving and avoid distractions. Google expects you to be careful of sharing passwords. Kylie Murphy – Curtin University (Google, 2013). 10
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 Privacy – What is collected? Google collects your information to provide better services and target ads. You give Google personal information like your name, email, address, telephone number or credit card and photo. Google gathers information from your devices like hardware, model, operating system version, unique device identification, mobile network and phone number. (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University (Lunduke, 2010). 11
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 Privacy – What is collected? Log information like search queries, telephone logs, IP address, and browser cookies stored locally even when you visit. When you visit (search or navigate) you are subject to Google’s terms of service and privacy policies. Location information, GPS signals sent by your mobile device, Wi-Fi access points and cell towers. (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University (Lunduke, 2010). 12
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 How is the information collected used? To tailor your content, search results and ads and improve service quality. Google does not use your information to place you in a category, i.e. race, religion, sexual orientation or health. Kylie Murphy – Curtin University Used for showing your profile information, name and photo. Information you share publicly will be listed on search engines. (Google, 2013). 13
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 How is the information collected used? You can remove your content, but it may not delete completely as residual copies remain in Google’s back up system. Google shares and processes your personal information with Affiliates outside your country. Google does not share your information unless you consent or if it is applicable by law or government request. Google works with regulatory authorities and local data protection authorities to resolve complaints. (Google, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 14
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 So, what is Google really doing with your personal information ? (Ruscoe & Lenssen, 2008) Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 15 10
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 "Despite their stated concern for individual privacy, online consumers are in many cases very quick to provide significant amounts of personal information.“ (Brown & Muchira, 2004, p.68). Studies have shown “people don’t seem to value their privacy as much on the Internet.” (Goettke & Christiana, 2007, Introna, 1997). Is this really the case? Kylie Murphy – Curtin University (Reisinger, 2013). 16
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 Consumer’s Five Primary Concerns of Privacy • Collection: the perception that too much data are being collected. • Unauthorized secondary use: personal data collected for one purpose are used for another without permission. • Errors: personal data are accidentally or deliberately altered, corrupting the integrity of a database. • Improper access: unauthorized individuals access personal data. • Invasion: unsolicited and unwanted communications to consumers. (Waxer, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University (Brown & Muchira, 2004). 17
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 Are these consumer concerns on privacy justified??? (Waxer, 2013) Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 18
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 “Google Is Being Sued For Reading Gmail In Order To Target Ads” Google allegedly has “violated several laws, such as federal antiwiretapping laws” (Bort, 2013). Google CEO Larry Page (Bort, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 19
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 US District Court judge Lucy Koh, “ruled that the Google practice of using software to mine data from emails for advertising purposes could constitute a violation of federal wiretap laws” (Price, 2013). (Price, 2013). “Judge Koh referenced Google’s Terms of “Judge Koh referenced Google’s Terms of Service and Privacy Polices in a ruling that Service and Privacy Polices in a ruling that stated that the corporation did not stated that the corporation did not adequately inform users about the Gmail adequately inform users about the Gmail interceptions” (Price, 2013). interceptions” (Price, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 20
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 QUESTION??? (The McCrindle Blog, 2012). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University If Google added email interceptions in their terms and services and privacy policies, would you remain with Google and accept their terms or discontinue with their services? 21
    • NET303 Politics & Power (Sahagian, 2013). (Lunduke, 2010). SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 “Google Insists It Has the Right to Read Your Emails” (Sahagian, 2013). “Google is seeking to appeal a “Google is seeking to appeal a ruling that it broke wiretapping ruling that it broke wiretapping laws when the company scanned and laws when the company scanned and read Gmail users’ personal emails in read Gmail users’ personal emails in order to promote advertising and order to promote advertising and build user profiles” (Sahagian, build user profiles” (Sahagian, 2013). 2013). (Niedermayer, 2012). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 22
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 (Tate, 2011). 28/10/13 “Google lawsuit stirs debate over email privacy rights” (Munroe, 2013). Marc Rotenberg, a Privacy Lawyer Marc Rotenberg, a Privacy Lawyer states regarding this lawsuit states regarding this lawsuit that “It’s alarming for the that “It’s alarming for the world’s largest email service world’s largest email service provider to say they don’t have provider to say they don’t have an obligation to protect an obligation to protect privacy.” privacy.” (Munroe, 2013). (CBC News, 2013). Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 23
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 Conclusion I hope this presentation has helped you understand Google’s Terms of Service and Privacy Policies and how it relates to your privacy and security. Thank you for your time… Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 24
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 28/10/13 References Bort, J. (September 27, 2013). Google Is Being Sued For Reading Gmail In Order To Target Ads. Business Insider. Retrieved October 23, 2013, from http://www.businessinsider.com.au/google-is-being-sued-for-reading-email-to-targetads-2013-9 Bort, J. (September 27, 2013). Google Is Being Sued For Reading Gmail In Order To Target Ads. [Image]. Business Insider. Retrieved October 23, 2013, from http://www.businessinsider.com.au/google-is-being-sued-for-reading-emailto-target-ads-2013-9 Brown, M., & Muchira, R. (2004). Investigating the Relationship between Internet Privacy Concern and Online Purchase Behavior. Journal of Electronic Commerce Research, 591), 62-70. Retrieved October 25, 2013, from http://www.csulb.edu/web/journals/jecr/issues/20041/Paper6.pdf CBC News. (August 14, 2013). No privacy for Gmail users. [Image]. CBC News. Retrieved October 25, 2013, from http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Technology+and+Science/ID/2401260676/ CypherApps. (2013). Securing Google Docs. [Image]. Retrieved October 21, 2013, from http://www.cipherapps.com/ Google. (2013). Age requirements for Google+. Retrieved October 25, 2013, https://support.google.com/a/answer/1645514?hl=en Google. (2013). Google Products. Retrieved October 21, 2013, from http://www.google.com/about/products/ Google. (2013). Privacy Policy. Retrieved October 20, 2013, from https://www.google.com.au/intl/en/policies/privacy/ Google. (2013). Terms of Service. Retrieved October 20, 2013, from https://www.google.com.au/intl/en/policies/terms/regional.html Google. (2013). Terms of Service update. Retrieved October 20, 2013, from https://www.google.com.au/intl/en/policies/terms/regional.html Goettke, R., & Christiana, J. (2007). Privacy and Online Social Networking Websites. Computer Science 199r: Special Topics in Computer Science Computation and Society: Privacy and Technology. Retrieved September 14, 2013, from http://www.eecs.harvard.edu/cs199r/fp/RichJoe.pdf Introna, L. D. (1997). Privacy and the computer: why we need privacy in the information society. Metaphilosophy, 28(3), 259275. Lunduke, B. (2010). Google Hates Linux and Video Games. [Image]. Retrieved October 24, 2013, from http://lunduke.com/?p=1129 Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 25
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 References 28/10/13 Lunduke, B. (2010). Google Hates Linux and Video Games. [Image]. Retrieved October 23, 2013, from http://lunduke.com/?p=1129 Ms. Smith. (June 10, 2010). Microsoft Proposes Each PC Needs A Health Certificate or No Net Access Allowed. [Weblog]. Retrieved October 21, 2013, from http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/microsoft-proposes-each-pcneeds-health-certi Munroe, I. (August 16, 2013). Google lawsuit stirs debate over email privacy rights Critics condemn internet giant over 'no legitimate expectation of privacy' argument. CBC News. Retrieved October 24, 2013, from http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/google-lawsuit-stirs-debate-over-email-privacy-rights-1.1413906 Niedermayer, C. (2012). Court of Appeal, CA – Opinions. [Image]. Retrieved October 24, 2013, from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.cniederm.coasearch Price, J. (September 27, 2013). Google Email Practices Dealt Setback In Federal Privacy Dispute. ID Radar. Retrieved October 23, 2013, from https://www.idradar.com/news-stories/digital-privacy/Google-Gmail-Practices-Could-ConstitutePrivacy-Violation Price, J. (September 27, 2013). Google Email Practices Dealt Setback In Federal Privacy Dispute. [Image]. Retrieved October 23, 2013, from https://www.idradar.com/news-stories/digital-privacy/Google-Gmail-Practices-Could-ConstitutePrivacy-Violation Reisinger, D. (2013). Google slapped with lawsuit over man's salacious images. [Image]. Retrieved October 23, 2013, from http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-57601483-83/google-slapped-with-lawsuit-over-mans-salacious-images/ Ruscoe, T. & P. Lenssen. (February 18, 2008). Winner of the Google Logo Redesign Contest. [Weblog]. Retrieved October 22, 2013, from http://blogoscoped.com/archive/2008-02-18-n61.html Sahagian, J. (October 10, 2013). Google Insists It Has the Right to Read Your Emails. Retrieved October 23, 2013, from http://wallstcheatsheet.com/stocks/google-insists-it-has-the-right-to-read-your-emails.html/ Sahagian, J. (October 10, 2013). Google Insists It Has the Right to Read Your Emails. [Image]. Retrieved October 23, 2013, from http://wallstcheatsheet.com/stocks/google-insists-it-has-the-right-to-read-your-emails.html/ Slatten, D. (2013). NEW Google Logo: High-quality PNG Image with Transparent Background. [Image]. Retrieved October 21, 2013 from http://www.seomofo.com/orm/new-google-logo.html Surf Context. (2013). Fast and easy access for 1 million users. [Image]. Retrieved October 22, 2013, from http://www.surfnet.nl/en/Thema/coin/voorcloudproviders/Pages/default.aspx Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 26
    • NET303 Politics & Power SP3/2013 A2 References 28/10/13 Tate, R. (November, 05, 2011). How Google Spies on Your Gmail Account (And How To Stop It). [Image]. Retrieved October 24, 2013, from http://gawker.com/5800868/how-google-spies-on-your-gmail-account-and-how-to-stop-it The McCrindle Blog. (November 14, 2012). The most asked questions in Australia according to Google search suggestions. [Weblog, Image]. Retrieved October 25, 2013, from http://www.mccrindle.com.au/themccrindleblog/most_asked_questions_australia_google_search_suggestions The Mayer Brown Practices. (July 29, 2013). FTC’s Recent Revisions to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”). Meyer Brown. Retrieved October 25, 2013, from http://www.mayerbrown.com/FTCs-RecentRevisions-to-theChildrens-Online-Privacy-Protection-Act-COPPA-07-29-2013/ Waxer, C. (January 01, 2013). Navigating the Murky Boundaries of Privacy. [Image]. Retrieved October 26, 2013, from http://www.dmnews.com/navigating-the-murky-boundaries-of-privacy/article/273190/ Wright, C. (October, 24, 2013). Kissing Google goodbye. Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved October 24, 2013, from http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/digital-life-news/kissing-google-goodbye-20131023-2vzso.html Villasenor, J. 2013. Google Glass and the Demise of Ownership What the restrictions on resale of the gadget mean for consumers. [Image]. Retrieved October 22, 2013 from, http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2013/04/google_glass_terms_of_service_restrictions_on_r esale_are_bad_for_consumers.html Google Policy Primer by Kylie Murphy is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Kylie Murphy – Curtin University 27