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Gestalt & Design
 

Gestalt & Design

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GESTALT = whole > parts ...

GESTALT = whole > parts

Figure / Ground (positive space / negative space)
Similarity (rhythm, hierarchy)
Proximity (grouping)
Closure (mind the gap)
Continuity (implied direction)

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    Gestalt & Design Gestalt & Design Presentation Transcript

    • G E S T A L T = w h ole i s g r eater tha n sum of I ts p arts
    • G E S T A L T = w h ole i s g r eater tha n sum of Its p arts
    • G E S T A L T = w h ole i s g reater tha n sum of Its p arts
    • G E ST A L T = w h ole i s g reater tha n sum of Its p arts
    • GESTALT = whole is greater than sum of its parts
    • Intro: GESTALT = whole > parts 1) Figure / Ground (positive space / negative space) 2) Similarity (rhythm, hierarchy) 3) Proximity (grouping) 4) Closure (mind the gap) 5) Continuity (implied direction)
    • FIGURE / GROUND perceptual tendency to separate whole figures from their backgrounds >The focus at any moment is the figure. >Everything else is the ground. (positive / negative)
    • M.C. Escher
    • Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
    • Similarity shared visual characteristics such as shape, size, color, texture, or value will be seen as belonging together in the viewer’s mind
    • Bridget Riley
    • Proximity / Grouping objects or shapes that are close to one another appear to form groups - Tone / Value - Color - Shape - Size - etc.
    • Thomas P. Anshutz, The Ironworkers’ Noontime
    • Closure suggesting a visual connection or continuity between sets of elements which do not actually touch each other in a composition
    • Tauba Auerbach
    • Michelangelo, Creation of Adam, c. 1510. Sistine Chapel, Rome (detail)
    • Continuity arrangement of various elements so that a characteristic continues a direction from one element to another creates an implied continuation
    • Review: GESTALT = whole > parts 1) Figure / Ground (positive space / negative space) 2) Similarity (rhythm, hierarchy) 3) Proximity (grouping) 4) Closure (mind the gap) 5) Continuity (implied direction)