Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Skilled newcomers to canada
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Skilled newcomers to canada

1,097
views

Published on

Challenges that skilled newcomers to Canada may have when trying to integrate into this Country. Tips to obtain a job in Canada

Challenges that skilled newcomers to Canada may have when trying to integrate into this Country. Tips to obtain a job in Canada

Published in: Career, Business

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,097
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. SKILLED NEWCOMERS TO CANADAWHAT TO EXPECT, WHAT TO DOJose Laredo June 2013
  • 2. “But then I came to the conclusion that no, while there may be an immigration problem, it isnt really a serious problem. The really serious problem is assimilation.”Samuel P. Huntington quotes USA, 1821‐19002
  • 3. Content Introduction Reasons for immigration How are immigrants performing in their new environment Labour market: two sides of the story What is behind the scenes? About the culture Ok, there are issues in finding a job, what can you do? Conclusion Annex ‐ Job search method used by Canadian born and Immigrants 3
  • 4. IntroductionThe purpose of this presentation is to provide prospective or recent skilled newcomers with an overview of the problems they may face when trying to find a job in Canada, and to give some advice on how to overcome some of these challenges. It is mainly oriented to those people who have no relatives, friends or connections in this country. In other words, for those who are willing to start a "new" life in a new environment.The decision to migrate is not an easy one, and as you will see in the following slides, the integration process could be harder than you expect. I believe that getting informed and prepared before coming to Canada is a must. A lack of planning could result in a high price to pay.How fast/slow you succeed in your goals will be based on many decisions you have to make during your adaptation journey in your new country. Here you will find information and knowledge obtained through experience that could help speed up your professional life in Canada. There is no easy path to integrate you in a new reality, but with good attitude and perseverance you can make it. You and your close ones may receive the benefits and rewards.If you need to obtain more information about this topic, refer to the citations mentioned throughout the presentation.Note: Skilled newcomer/newcomer in this presentation is based on CICs definition of "Economic Class Immigrants". It includes people selected as permanent residents for their skills and ability to contribute to Canadas economy such as skilled workers, business people and provincial nominees (CIC, 2004)4
  • 5. Canada’s reasons to promoteimmigration1. Baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) are retiring; they need to be replaced2. Aging population: in 1971 there were 6.6 people/senior, in 2036 there could be 2:1 3. Need of skilled workforce for a knowledge economy4. High‐skilled immigrants — are great for innovation.5. Diversity generates economic advantage6. Newcomers may expand international trades both ways7. immigrant workers are more willing to move to find work than native‐born workers8. Motivation to succeed and to obtain achievements for themselves and for their offspring9. Immigrants attract more foreign investment10. Children of immigrants obtain more educational attainments than Canadian‐bornSource: Rethinking Immigration – The Globe and Mail  ‐ May 4, 2012Conference Board of Canada Report October 2010 – Immigrants as innovatorsJ.Reitz, H.Zhang, N.Hawkins, 2011, “Comparisons of the success of racial minority immigrant offspring in the United States, Canada and AustraliaCanada requires highly‐educated, highly‐skilled immigrants each year to meet labour demand or to fill skills gaps 5
  • 6. Immigrants want to move to CanadaReasons to moveFamily reunificationProvide better life for childrenEconomic conditionsDesired lifestyleEducational opportunitiesEtc..Personal Country’s reputationHealth CareEconomyImmigrants are well acceptedSafe place, low levels of crimeImmigration rules are not stringentCitizenship (and passport) after some yearsCorruption free environmentPeace and political stabilityEtc..Potential immigrants are positive about their new life in CanadaSource: Immigrants’ perspectives on their first four years in Canada – Statistics Canada6
  • 7. How are immigrants performing in their new environment?7
  • 8. Skilled immigrants arrive every year …8050,000100,000150,000200,000250,000300,0002005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012Skilled Imm. TotalBy 2010, about 66% of immigrants arrive to Canada in the category of skilled immigrants; 22% are in the family class, 9%  are refugees, and 3% in other categories156,312138,251131,244 149,071153,458186,917156,118 160,617262,241257,515236,754 252,124Despite the global recession in 2008, the number of immigrants has increased in the last years. The immigration system may be slow to adjust the number of people required in the labor marketSource: Citizenship and Immigrationabout 20% of Canadians were born outside of the country Every day approx. 705 immigrants arrive to Canada,  564 have a university degree, and 440 of them are skilled newcomers (62% of the total). About 25% of Canadian‐born people have university degrees.
  • 9. Most immigrants face hardships when arriving“Nearly half of poor immigrants living in Canada are those who have come as skilled workers”.“These days, university‐educated newcomers earn an average of 67 per cent of their Canadian‐born, university‐educated counterparts”.Tamsin McMahon – MacLean’s Magazine Wednesday, April 24, 2013“The hundreds of thousands of immigrants who arrive in Canada each year could all tell variations of this story. Its a kind of ‘Canadian dream’ ‐ that the suffering of the first generation will be worth it because of the success of the next…work experience is discounted by a factor of almost 70 per cent by employers in Canadas labour market”Ratna Omidvar ‐ The Globe and Mail. Aug. 04 2010“Over the past three decades the labour market outcomes of immigrants to Canada have declined. Many recent arrivals have had difficulty finding employment, and earnings have gone down, particularly among men. Research has shown that there is no single explanation for this decline”Gartner Picot & Arthur Sweetman – Making it in Canada, April 20129
  • 10. % of Employment and salaries of university educated newcomersNew immigrants: have higher unemployment rates, are under‐employed,  or earn less than Canadian born workersSource: “Labour market outcomes of immigrants by educational attainment, gender and age”  York University ‐ TIEDI Analytical Report #16 ‐ http://www.yorku.ca/tiedi/pubreports.htmlUnemployment rate10Salary per year
  • 11. % People in relevant employment by country of studySource: TIEDI Analytical Report 14, Dec. 2010, York University, “Are degrees/ diplomas from inside and outside of Canada valued differently in the labour market?”11
  • 12. Labour market: two sides of the story12
  • 13. Skilled newcomers struggle to find professional jobs“We find evidence of a glass ceiling (barrier that limits access to high‐wage jobs) in the spirit of Albrecht et al (2003) for older and more educated visible minority men in comparison with similar white men” ‐ Krishna Pendakur and R. Pendakur1, Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada, 2009There is extensive literature about the multiple difficulties that immigrants have when trying to find professional jobs:“Newcomers to Canada are more likely to be in precarious employment. People in precarious employment face a very different set of working conditions compared to those in SER (standard employment relationship). Many are in contract jobs and temporary positions, working irregular hours or on‐call. Many piece together year‐round, full‐time hours by working for multiple employers. They often lack supplemental health benefits to cover unexpected expenses and have to rely on their own savings to fund retirement” McMaster University – United Way Toronto, “It’s more than poverty”, 2013"Highly educated immigrants are arriving in Canada with the promise of good employment ..instead, they are experiencing a severe transition penalty in the form of low‐paying jobs, often with inadequate protections. This is a cycle that stretches into unsatisfactory employment for years and can eventually result in long‐term economic hardship” ,"  Cecilia Diocson Workplace Rights for Immigrants in BC: The Case of Filipino Workers, 2007“The immigrant household median income in Canada is in the top half of OECD countries but its level is 21% lower than the native‐born one (compared with ‐21% across OECD countries). 23% of persons living in an immigrant household live with income below the poverty line, compared with an average of 17% across OECD countries.” Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development ‐ http://www.oecd.org/migration/integrationindicators/keyindicatorsbycountry/name,219003,en.htm13
  • 14. Barriers in Canada… according to newcomersSource:  TD Bank Report, 2012 “Knocking Down Barriers Faced By New Immigrants To Canada”14
  • 15. However, employers don’t find people to hire…There are some jobs that are hard to fill: technicians (in engineering, computer science, health), medical professions, skilled trades, engineersSource: Canadian Business, “Canadian Unemployment rates” Apr 18, 2013“Skills shortages will continue to exist in certain industries and regions, but not enough to jeopardize the entire economy” HRSDC study. Source: Peter Cappelli – Why good people can’t get jobsDifficulty by country15
  • 16. Employers’ barriers to competitiveness: skills shortages is includedThe Canadian Chamber of Commerce  mentioned that there are  10 top barriers  to competiveness: skills shortages , barriers to world markets for energy products, Inadequate workforce productivity, inadequate public infrastructure planning, tax complexity, poor innovation performance,  need to trade in new markets, internal barriers to trade, uncompetitive travel and tourism strategies, and lack of access to capital.“The labour market is affected by a demographic shift resulting in retirements and a growing mismatch between the skills needed and those available. By one estimate, the skills shortfall by 2016 will be exacerbated by almost 550,000 unskilled workers who will not qualify for skilled vacancies that will exist . That number could double to over one million by 2021”Regarding skills shortages:Source: Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Tackling the Top 10 Barriers to Competitiveness – 2013. Booklet_Top_10_Barriers_2013.pdfCompanies say that they don’t have enough workers: “The story is the same across much of Alberta, where small and mid‐sized businesses – already struggling to compete with the province’s oil and gas sector for workers ”Source: The Globe and Mail, April 30, 2013 – “Business’s cross‐Canada lament: We need foreign workers” 16
  • 17. So, what factors go into obtaining a job?As a newcomer, your influence in companies’ culture, or the society is very limited, and your job prospects depends on the number of applicants and jobs available in the labour market. Personal capitalCompany’s cultureSociety, Economy, External factorsJOBImmigrants and Canadian‐ born have an issue when trying to find jobs in Canada. There is a labour market that balances the supply and demand in any job category.However, newcomers are at disadvantage: qualifications, education, and experience may be different to  Canadian standards. Newcomers need to prove that they are up to these standardsSource: McLeans – April 24, 2013 “Why the world’s best and brightest struggle to find jobs in Canada”17
  • 18. What’s behind the scenes?“ Value, by definition, is the transference of trust. You cant convince someone you have value, just as you cant convince someone to trust you. You have to earn trust by communicating and demonstrating that you share the same values and beliefs.”  Simon Sinek, “Start with Why”18
  • 19. Your human capital is influenced by …CultureYouLanguageEducationIn a new environment, other factors than your education or work history are important. To have chances of getting a job you may need to have cultural skills and specific experience required in the market. Prioritizing the development of hard skills may not be the correct approach.English proficiencyTone, timingCanadian idiomsLicenseUpdated knowledgeCredentialsCultural IQCultural backgroundWork historyAchievementsIndustryPositionSkillsDegree(s)ContactsPersonalitySupportFundsFamilyOtherCountry of originEthnicityLast NameAge Body languagePitch, loudnessProfessionalCountry matesWork matesOthersFriendsOpennessConscientiousnessExtraversionAgreeablenessNeuroticism19
  • 20. English proficiency and tacit knowledge of Canadian behaviour are key for companiesCultureCompanyLanguageEducationThere is a minimum of hard skills required for a position. For regulated professions, credentials is a must.  Language and experience in Canada are the most important factors for companies..CommunicateAccentCredentialsReferralsCanadian valuesSalaryWork historyIndustryPositionSkillsPersonalityExperience in CanadaPrevious job positionsCulturally fit for workplaceIndustryPersonal Mgmt skillsIzumi Sakamoto “Canadian Experience Employment Challenges, and Skilled Immigrants”Philip Oreopoulos (2011),  “Why do some employers prefer to interview Matthew, but not Samir?”The Conference Board of Canada – “Employability Skills – What are employers looking for?”Team work skillsThinkLicenseContinuous learnerSource: 20
  • 21. Plus: employers look for someone who does the same job anywhere else1. To hire someone who has experience in the position they need to fill in.2. Someone who has been trained in the job position and industry3. Loyal employees  that are willing to stay several years4. Young, energetic, positive workers5. To attract someone who is already employed6. Technologically savvy and continuous learner7. Whenever possible not to hire anyone and assign these duties to other ones The economic situation after the 2008 crisis has forced companies to look for efficiency, innovation, and low cost; so they may want:Also, there is a huge pool of applicants, so employers find different ways to screen in candidates:1. Job descriptions2. Tracking software for resumes3. Interviews that focus on behavioural traits4. Assessment of (over) qualifications5. Salary offersThere could be 100s applicants for a job posting. So, if a person cant find a job, it’s not because his/her lack of skills; companies want best value for money: good skills, good person, no training required, and at market salary (or below)Source: Peter Cappelli – Why good people can’t get jobs ‐ The Skills Gap and What Companies Can Do About It 21
  • 22. and what’s the role of the Government?“A simple way to take measure of a country is to look at how many want in.. And how many want out”, Tony Blair“Despite having a much greater proportion of immigrants in its population than other Western countries, Canada is far more open to, and optimistic about, immigration than its counterparts in Europe and the United States … This national ethos is supported by government policies of multiculturalism, anti‐discrimination laws, and settlement programs that promote integration through public‐private partnerships. Such initiatives are mostly about helping migrants find jobs and integrate into society, not about instilling a set of cultural norms and values”1. What are those professions and trades that Canadian companies need to thrive in the global market?2. What are those skills that immigrants should have to succeed in Canada?3. How to forecast the labour demand of skilled workers (permanent, temporary) in specific fields and according to economic cycles?4. What is the appropriate level of immigration to achieve short and long term economic goals?5. How to motivate immigration to different regions and not only big cities?6. How much does immigration increase/decrease the economic well‐being of the society?7. Etc..The purpose of the Government is to create wealth for all residents and citizens regardless of where they were born. Economic growth is driven by the three Ps – population, participation and productivity. Immigration as part of the population policy is a complex subject; there are many “angles” that need to be taken into consideration; some of them are:Garnett Picot & Arthur Sweetman, Making it Canada – Immigration Outcomes and Policies, 2012Irene Bloemraad – Understanding Canadian Exceptionalism in immigration and pluralism policy – U. of California, 201222
  • 23. About the Culture "Recognize yourself in he and she who are not like you and me”, Carlos Fuentes23
  • 24. Be aware of the integration processYour integration in Canada will take time, and it can be represented in the charts:Canadian CultureKeep Heritage‐ ++IntegratedSeparatedAssimilatedMarginalizedSource: Berry, J.W. (2011). “Integration and Multiculturalism: Ways towards Social Solidarity” Papers on Social Representations Page 5 Volume 20Culture can be defined as the shared beliefs and values of a group of people; our learned way of living.“Culture rules virtually every aspect of our life and like most people, we are completely unaware of this.  … Culture is vital because it enables its members to function with one another without the need to negotiate meaning at every moment. Culture is learned and forgotten, so despite its importance we are generally unconscious of its influence on the manner in which we perceive the world and interact within it. Culture is significant because as we work with others it both enables us and impedes us in our ability to understand and work effectively together” www.intercultures.gc.caPerceived CompetenceSource: Guilherme Pires (2006). Improving expatriate adjustment and effectiveness in ethnically diverse countries: marketing insightsCanadian CultureKeep Heritage‐ ++MulticulturalMelting PotExclusionExclusionIntercultural strategies in ethno‐cultural groups, and the larger society "To be culturally intelligent requires embracing the spirit of the chameleon” Rasheed Joseph‐Young,  Thesis Cultural Intelligence and Global Business Leadership, 200924
  • 25. Becoming culturally competentYour cultural learning process starts with the ability to communicate/interact competently in different situations and also in learning and using appropriate behavioursSource: Thomas Vulpe – Canadian Foreign Service Institute, “A profile of the inter‐culturally effective person”Adaptation skillsAn attitude of modesty and respectUnderstanding the concept of cultureKnowledge of CanadaRelationship‐buildingWhat is an inter‐culturally effective person? It is someone who is able to “live contentedly and work successfully in another culture”There are three main attributes to be culturally effective:1. Have the ability to communicate with people of another culture in a way that earns their respect and trust, thereby encouraging a cooperative and productive workplace that is conducive to the achievement of professional or assignment goals2. Adapt your professional skills (both technical and managerial) to fit local conditions and constraints3. Adjust personally so that s/he is content and generally at ease in the host culture.How to do that? You need to work on:Knowledge of yourselfIntercultural communicationOrganizational skillsPersonal and professional commitmentNote: To see how culture can influence the way we think, check “What’s a good plan? Louise Rasmussen – Applied Research Associates  (http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/265858/1/JCEDM_Rasmussen_et_al.pdf)25
  • 26. How to learn about Canadian Culture?Obviously, the best option to learn the Canadian culture is to be physically present in the country. To start learning this culture you need to be aware of the differences, adjust your behaviour to what is accepted here, and find your  comfort zone when interacting with others. 26Before coming, one possible way to observe Canadian cultural traits is by watching videos on the internet. Observe and compare TV commercials or humor programs with your original country. Check the implicit beliefs, relationships, small talk, emotions, value of time, gender roles, authorities, conversation topics, etiquette, body language, attires, communications, etc. For example, search and watch  videos – “I am Canadian(s), The Canadians, Canadian Stereotypes or Canadian Culture” ‐ and compare them with products/people/ads in different countries. You may also watch “Just for Laughs” to see how people behave on the streets, or watch Russell Peters who jokes on cultural groups and stereotypes in CanadaNotice that Canada is a multicultural country, so try to avoid generalizations or stereotypes. People may have a common culture but there are variations in regions/ cities of the country. There are limited courses about cultural adaptation in Universities and they are more oriented to foreign graduate students. Here, I’m presenting some tips, but you need to look for more details  on the internet. To understand about cultural differences, please check Geer Hofstede and his studies on cultural dimensions,  Fons Trompenaars and his research on “seven dimensions of culture”. Additional sources could include  Andy Molinsky, Phillip Harris, and Robert Moran. Highly recommended is also reading about the work of Lionel Laroche in Canada.
  • 27. Ok, there are issues in finding a job,what can you do?27
  • 28. Know yourself – what you need to succeed1. Determination and passion: if you have taken the decision to move, convince yourself that there is no chance to go back “home”, your new home will be Canada; in this way you will only have the option to succeed in your new country.2. Planning skills: you need to have a vision, a purpose and a plan for your life. Research about the Canadian Labour Market, the Canadian Culture, Canadian associations, professional designations, etc., and include these factors in your plans.3. Be positive: reflect a spirit of excellence in everything you do; think about positive possibilities and the best things will come within to your reach. Believe in yourself that you will be successful; it’s easy to fail if you don’t have a dream and don’t work hard.  4. Generate ideas, take initiatives and work: improve your English, polish your skills, update your knowledge, start a business, etc. and for everything you do, build confidence by practicing/doing it.5. Persist: everything that will happen to you will be the result of your actions; nothing comes for free, you will need to work tirelessly and make daily decisions. There could be many failures and hardships, so you will need to keep focus on your goals.6. Push yourself but be flexible: if your path to a professional job is too long, maybe it’s time to postpone this path, and work on plan B or C and move on with it. Later, you may follow your initial goal.7. Put things into perspective: balance life and work, you need to rest, be with your family, and also to be at peace with yourself.Apart from language, skills, and being culturally competent, you may need some personal “traits”:Richard St. John, “What leads to success”Andy Andrews, “Seven decisions that determine personal success”Nick Noorani, “7 Success Secrets for Canadian Immigrants”Adapted from 28
  • 29. Language Skills and CredentialsYou obtained a good score in IELTS or you have worked for a period of time in an English speaking country, so you think you’re ready to hit the road in Canada? Think it over: in a professional environment, it’s not only the way you talk. Brits, Americans, Aussies, Kiwis, and Canadians communications are similar but different, they also need to adapt their style. To learn the “Canadian way” you can practice the language before you come. Read Canadian newspapers, watch TV, listen to the radio before coming. When you’ve arrived try to integrate with communities other than yours to check your understanding and if others are able to understand you. However, effective communications include also the writing style, networking style, phone etiquette, and presentations. Each of these areas have a cultural component. In Canada, communications are direct but have a low key tone: being polite, reserved, and not confrontational are important attributes for effective communications. Another element to consider is your body language when you communicate: the way you look, your hands, facial expressions, posture, etc. Something additional is the pitch, tone and if someone is interrupted when talking. In informal meetings, Canadians prefer to talk about business or general things and not about their personal  lives. All of these communications features come into play for good communications.What to do? How to improve? Take a course related to business communications. Search in Google “communications for the workplace Canada”, “professional communications”, or “communication for internationally trained professionals”. Many colleges and Universities offer related courses 29
  • 30. Foreign Credential RecognitionWhen you come to Canada, you need to assess your credentials to demonstrate that you have studied/ learned some profession in a recognized university. There are organizations that provide credential assessment services. This process may take time and money, but it’s worth to do it.Even if your profession is not‐regulated (i.e. information technology, business administration among others), it is advisable to evaluate your education. This will allow you to continue further studies or to obtain internships/ jobs. If you don’t evaluate your credentials you will restrict your chances If your profession is regulated, you need to comply with professional regulations in a specific province. You may need to contact the professional association to find out the requirements and costs for licensing. Some associations allow to start this process from abroad. To obtain a professional job you must pass exams and complete supervised practices. This process may take several months (or years) to complete although you may have started the process before coming to Canada.  There are many organizations that offer credential assessments. For further information:http://www.cicic.ca/413/Assessment_of_credentials_for_employment_in_Canada_.canada30
  • 31. Want or Need to study more?Probably the higher your position in your previous country, the harder the path if your credentials are not recognized. If that’s the case, you may need to update your skills to start working  (usually in a position at the bottom of the career ladder), and to compete with other skilled residents in your current place.There are many options to study in Universities and Colleges. Perform a Cost/benefit analysis of the program. For example, if you don’t have any experience in Canada, and you decide to study to raise your profile and earnings, you may have the same economic results if you pay fees for an MBA ($50k‐$90k) or a college ($5K‐$10k). It’s a good idea to ask a mentor for advice tDepending on the specific field of study, it may be easier or harder to find a job. To make this decision, check labour market information, assess your skills and passion for the field, and choose those fields that have good job prospects.Other options include “bridging programs” for those people that require credentials or licenses. Contact professional associations to find more about this option. In any case, a co‐op component in the program could add value to any graduate or post‐graduate specialization.31For additional info, you may search: http://www.aucc.ca/canadian‐universities/study‐programs/
  • 32. How to make you visible to others? Build your reputation, update your professional profile in social media, post comments and let others know your value in the field and region in which you want to apply. Participate in professional associations, go and participate in  community centers, volunteer in Not for Profit activities. How to know what the market is requiring? You need to have labour market information (LMI) to make your decisions.  Find LMI related to provinces: unemployment rates by gender, age, type of industry:Google “labour market information Canada” http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/lmi/publications/index.shtmlhttp://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/about/publication/jobseek/lminfo.shtmlGoogle: “Job prospects province/region” For example in:Ontario: http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/eng/labourmarket/ojf/Alberta: http://eae.alberta.ca/labour‐and‐immigration/labour‐market‐information/labour‐market‐forecasts/alberta‐regional‐occupational‐demand‐outlook‐2012‐2016.aspxBritish Columbia: https://www.workbc.ca/Statistics/Labour‐Market/Pages/Labour‐Market.aspxGoogle: “Jobs in demand province” In this case for Canada:http://www.workingincanada.gc.ca/LMI_bulletin.dohttp://www23.hrsdc.gc.ca/l.3bd.2t.1ilshtml@‐eng.jsp?lid=16%20&fid=1&lang=enNetworking and Labour market Information32
  • 33. Where to live?It’s better to live (at least initially) where you may find a job, where your skills are needed. Don’t make your decision based  on weather/climate or because you have friends in a city. If your profession is required in the West/North, etc. of Canada, explore opportunities there. Don’t buy a house before landing a job.There are many rankings that show the advantage of living in large cities, for example, based on 8 factors (Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita, GDP growth, Productivity, Productivity growth, Income per capita, Income growth, Employment growth, Unemployment rate), Calgary and Toronto rank 2nd and 6th in a group of 23 cities (Paris, London, Oslo, Madrid, Sidney, and many American cities). Source: Toronto Region Board of Trade’s 2013 Scorecard on Prosperity.Source: OECD, Education at a Glance 2011 Statistics Canada, Education  in Canada: An International  Perspective 2011Population (25 to 64) with university degree & employment rateHowever, if we check the employment rates in detail for university educated people, we may notice that B.C. and Ontario don’t perform very well.“Among Toronto’s new immigrant population, 55 % have a university degree, .. behind Calgary, Vancouver, Montreal and Halifax. Making matters worse, Toronto fails to maximize its new immigrants’ skills, with 40 per cent making a downward shift in their career”Source: The Globe and Mail, Saturday April 13, “Toronto’s recipe for prosperity: More graduates – and more paths to good jobs” 33
  • 34. Bring enough moneyAs you may have noticed after reading the previous slides, finding a professional job could take days  .. or several months. If you don’t work for a while or work in a “survival” job, you may eat up your savings. In any case, you may lose confidence, and probably opportunities to practice your professional skills. On the other hand, you may have had a good standard of living in your previous country, so probably you will try to keep that one; however, in your new country things could be more expensive. If that’s the case, you may obtain a good job to support it, or you downsize your way of living to save moneyConstant worries about money could lead to bad decisions. People that bring enough money to Canada, obtain better positions and salaries than those that come with limited resources Source: TIEDI, York University, Report #1: “Labour outcomes of immigrants by savings brought to Canada” Average hourly wage by savings brought to Canada: 6 months, 2 years, 4 years after landing in Canada34
  • 35. Canadian experiencePerhaps the most important factor to obtain a job in Canada is Canadian experience; so why and how to obtain this experience? When employers evaluate a candidate, they value more on experience than in academic credentials. Employers consider valuable for an applicant to have internships or co‐op experience. Larger organizations value more specific experience than smaller ones where extracurricular activities are also considered.If you have not obtained a job after several weeks (or months), volunteering is an option to obtain Canadian experience. Working as a volunteer (for free) or in a Co‐op position (while studying) may allow you to show that you have experience in your field and also let you learn the business language, do networking, access internal job postings, know the workplace culture, and practice your hard/soft skills. Notice, that there are some regulated professions where volunteering is not allowed; if that’s the case try to find a similar position in a related area to obtain working experience. Also notice, that the lower the position you start, the more steps you need to climb. Voluntary work is part of the Canadian culture. Without volunteers, hospitals, nursing homes, and charities, community services, etc. could stop. People respect volunteers and help them find paid jobs. How to find a place to obtain working experience? Google “cooperative education city/region” or google “adult coop education region”. i.e. Toronto: http://www.toronto.ca/socialservices/work_exp.htmin Peel Region: http://www.dpcdsb.org/NR/exeres/575DA489‐CB8F‐4A76‐A011‐9DF74F03C391.htmIf you plan to go to college, Google “coop education college Canada”. You will find many resources. However, be careful with these programs, do your research to ensure a Co‐op program is provided. Ask a mentor.Finally, Google ”internship for internationally educated professionals” or “internship for newcomers program”. You will find internship programs for many professions and sectors. One examples is careeredge.ca35
  • 36. About mentoringMentoring may be one of the best options for newly arrived immigrants. Many of the “unknowns” of the Canadian environment have already been discovered, assessed and overcome by established immigrants. These ones can help with information related to workplace practices, communication styles, interview types, market demands, way to interact with others, etc. No job offer is expected in this relationship; however, mentors’ tips may help people adjust expectations, assist with career options, and  believe in themselves. The ideal mentor could be someone from similar background: country of origin, education, profession, industry. In this situation career coaching and professional steps could be monitored, and even exposure may be available; however,  if the mentor doesn’t have the same profession, he/she may also help with role‐modeling, counseling, and skills development.“Mentoring is a brain to pick, an ear to listen, and a push in the right direction” – John CrosbyIn a mentor/mentee relationship based on mutual respect and trust, the mentee can explore ideas in confidence, to look at his/her chances and in possibly to check what he/she may want from life. This guidance process could help people get up to speed.Additional reference: Nanda Dimitrov, Western Guide to Mentoring Graduate Students Across CulturesProbably the most valuable outcome of a mentoring relationship is when there is a transfer of knowledge for cultural adaptation. The mentee may learn selectively about the values, beliefs, and attitudes of Canadians and how they compare with his/her own culture. Topics could include power and distance, communication styles, generalizations, stereotypes, and how to read between the lines to understand Canadian expectations.How to find a mentor? Google “find a mentor in province” and you will find several resources. In Ontario, for example: http://www.ontarioimmigration.ca/en/working/OI_HOW_WORK_MENTOR.html36
  • 37. “Good things come to those who believe, better things come to those who have patience and the best things come to those who don’t give up…” UnknownConclusion37There are several challenges that skilled immigrants need to overcome to obtain professional jobs in their fields. If we see all of them as a group, it may become a paramount task to solve; however, if we start looking at each of them, the issues could be solved. Obviously, the more prepared you are when arriving in your new country, the more chances to land a job in less time. As you have seen in the previous slides, some challenges may also be opportunities to know who you are, to find new paths in life, or to test your abilities to re‐invent yourself. During this process, do not lose faith and keep moving to obtain your goals. You deserve to win, as long as you take the risk and work harder than ever.Some tips on what to do and how to do were presented here with regards to Canadian experience, credentials recognition, and language skills among others. I firmly believe that if you apply some of them, you may add value to your profile and chances to obtain a professional job in Canada.
  • 38. Annexes38
  • 39. Job search method used by Canadian born and ImmigrantsManagement Health Sales & ServJob Search Method C-born Immigrants C-born Immigrants C-born ImmigrantsFamily or friend 32.7 30.8 26.6 39.1 43.1 49.4Personal initiative 17.3 21.4 35.4 33.4 25.0 29.8Help wanted 13.5 10.3 10.2 14.2 16.4 11.4Directly recruited byemployer 19.6 17.8 17.6 13.7 11.2 11.7Other method 14.2 15.3 12.3 9.0 6.9 6.2Internet 3.0 2.0 1.8 5.5 1.7 1.8Head-hunter 4.7 5.9 n/a n/a 0.5 1.4News story 1.8 4.2 1.2 n/a 1.8 2.7Government agency 1.5 n/a 0.8 n/a 2.8 2.3On campus recruitment 3.6 2.4 3.5 n/a 1.1 2.2Union posting 0.2 n/a 1.2 n/a 0.1 n/aJob fair 0.2 n/a n/a n/a 0.7 n/aSource: TIEDI Analytical Report 17, Feb. 2011, York University, “How do immigrants find jobs?”39