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F22A DSM Turbo install
 

F22A DSM Turbo install

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how to instal a dsm turbo to a F22A honda engine

how to instal a dsm turbo to a F22A honda engine

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    F22A DSM Turbo install F22A DSM Turbo install Document Transcript

    • Version 1.0 1
    • Table Of ContentsKit Contents.......................................................... 3Engine Prep........................................................... 4 Oil Pan ......................................................................................................................... 4 Oil Return Hole ................................................................................................... 4 Oil Return Fitting ............................................................................................... 5Exhaust Removal.................................................. 6Making Room for the Compressor ....................... 7Oil Return Fitting - turbo ...................................... 7Turbo, Manifold, o2 housing................................. 7Fuel Injectors........................................................ 8ECU - Engine management .................................. 9Oil Feed Line......................................................... 9Oil Drain Line ...................................................... 10Intercooler .......................................................... 11Charge Pipes....................................................... 12Charge Pipe Pictures.......................................... 12Blow Off Valve .................................................... 15Vacuum Lines ..................................................... 16Testing - Starting the car ................................... 16Exhaust - Downpipe............................................ 17Coolant Lines...................................................... 17 2
    • Turbo Kit contentsDescription Quantity14b Turbo Charger 11st Gen DSM Turbo Manifold 11st Gen DSM o2 Housing 11st Gen DSM 450cc Injectors 4Chipped ECU 1Front Mount Intercooler 11st Gen DSM Blow Off Valve 1Blow Off Valve Mounting pipe 1Charge pipe Kit 1Oil Feed and Return kit 1 3
    • 1. Drain all oil from the engine. The more oil you can drain, the cleaner the job will be.2. Remove oil pan from the engine. Figure 1.3. With the oil pan removed, Dill a 5/8” diameter hole in the location shown in Figure 2. As high on the oil pan as possible. Figure 2. 4
    • 4. Locate brass fitting ‘A’ in figure 3. below. Here you have two options. You can either bring the oil pan and fitting to be welded. Or you can purchase “JB Weld” at your local auto parts store. I have had great success with JB weld; as long as it is mixed well, the surface is clean, and it is given proper time to cure. Weld, or JB weld the brass fitting into the oil pan, with the barbed section extruding from the pan. This will be for the oil return from the turbo. Re-install oil pan when complete. Figure 3. 5
    • 5. Remove the Exhaust header and downpipe should do whatever is necessary to retain the flex pipe (i.e.. Cut the exhaust). The flex pipe will be a vital part of your exhaust system. If you have a custom or aftermarket exhaust with a larger diameter than stock, make sure you get a corresponding diameter flex pipe. This should also be taken into consideration when having the downpipe fabricated. Though not 100% necessary, replacing the gasket is a very good idea. Figure 4. Figure 5. 6
    • 6. This is probably the most difficult part of the entire installation. You will need to grind away a portion of the block webbing, in order for the compressor of the turbo to fit. Remove the front torque mount from both the block and the cross member. Using an angle grinder, or other cutting/grinding tool, grind away the portion of the block shown in figure 6. Figure 6.7. Bolt fitting ‘D’ in Figure 3 onto the bottom of the turbo charger using gasket ‘E’. The location of fitting ‘D’ should be fairly evident. Make sure it is snug.8. Bolt the turbo manifold, turbocharger, and o2 housing assembly to the engine block. Use the factory studs and nuts. This may be a tight fit, and it may not go on perfectly the first time. Keep playing with it until the manifold slides on. (if you still cannot get the holes to line up, you may need to enlarge some of the holes). (See Figure 7.) 7
    • Figure 7.9. With the turbo and manifold all bolted up, we can now move on to the fuel injectors. Remove the fuel rail and old injectors. (This is beyond the scope of this guide; please consult a repair manual for your car). You will notice that there are 2 sets of seals for each of the injectors, a soft seal and a hard seal. The inside hole diameter must be enlarged slightly to fit the new 450cc fuel injectors. This can be done very easily with a Dremel, or other rotary tool. Repeat this process for all 4 injectors. Installation will now be reverse of removal. Make sure the fuel rail is nice and tight. Figure 8. 8
    • 10. Install the provided ECU. The ECU is located underneath the passenger side rug on the interior of the car. There is a large metal plate to protect the ECU. Unbolt the plate, unplug the three harnesses from the ECU, and plug in the new ECU. (A more detailed approach to removing and installing the ECU can be found in your repair manual).11. Install the oil feed line. Remove the oil pressure sensor found on the back of the engine block approximately 1” above the oil filter. It has a black cover on it, with one wire coming out. Pull off this black cap to expose the oil pressure sensor. Remove the oil pressure sensor (see repair manual). Using a generous portion of thread sealer, thread the fitting labeled ‘C’ in Figure 3, into the old oil pressure sensor location. Make sure it is nice and snug. Again using thread sealer, thread the oil pressure sensor into one of the holes on the fitting. Make sure it is snug. Next take the fitting labeled ‘H’ in Figure 3, and thread it into the other hole in fitting ‘C’. Thread one end up the steel braided line labeled ‘F’ in Figure 3, onto fitting ‘H’ and run the steal line up over the valve cover to the turbocharger. Thread fitting ‘G’ into the top most hole (opposite side of fitting ‘D’) of the turbo charger. Finally, thread the end of the steel braided line onto fitting ‘G’. Make sure all connections are tight. This is your oil feed system. Figure 9. 9
    • 12. Thread the second brass fitting labeled ‘A’ in Figure 3 into fitting ‘D’ using thread sealer once again. Locate the steel braided line labeled ‘B’ and connect each end to one of the brass fittings ‘A’ both on the oil pan and the turbocharger. Using the provided hose clamps ‘I’ clamp each connection down as tight as possible. This is your oil drain line. Note: You may need to shorten the oil return line so that it does not have any kinks or sharp bends in it. This is very important as it is a gravity fed line. It should have a smooth sweeping curved shape from the turbo to the oil pan. Figure 10 10
    • 13. Mount the Intercooler. Remove the front bumper (see repair manual). You will see the power steering cooler, located right in front of the A/C condenser. It is not necessary, but it will help a great deal to relocate this power steering cooler. I personally cut the input/output lines, relocated it and then reconnected the input output lines of the cooler with high strength power steering hose and hose clamps. Once the power steering cooler is out of the way, you will have ample room to mount the intercooler. This will have to be custom mounted. A good tip is to use the mounting tabs provided on the intercooler along with some small “L” brackets that can be found at home depot. This is one of the harder parts of the installation as well. Find a way to secure the intercooler.Figure 11. 11
    • 14. Construct the charge pipe system. Again, you will be on your own with this part of the installation. Use the pipes provided to construct an air tight path from the turbo outlet, through the intercooler, and too the throttle body. The pipes provided are a “Universal” set of charge pipes. They are not cut to specifically fit the accord. Because of this additional pipes or couplings may need to be purchased. Any coupling that is not being used in the direct vicinity of the turbocharger or exhaust manifold can be purchased at home depot in the plumbing department or from turbocharged cars in junkyards. If extra piping is needed these too can be found on junk yard cars. This step will take some time and some planning, but don’t get frustrated it will all come together eventually. The following is a collection of pictures to help you along with the charge pipe design process. Figure 12 12
    • 13
    • 14
    • 15. Have the blow off valve (BOV) welded to the upper charge pipe. The BOV should be approximately 18”-20” away from the throttle body. If you have the BOV welded, cut the flange off the black Blow off valve pipe supplied. Cut a hold approximately 1”-1.25” in diameter in the desired location on the charge pipes, have the flange welded to the pipe, and bolt the blow off valve to the pipe. Please not that the BOV it self is aluminum, be sure to use the proper welding rod. If you do not have access to a welder, there is a second alternative. You can use the supplied BOV mounting pipe as part of your charge pipes. The only difficulty here is that you will need to purchase two 2.5” – 2” reducer pipes due to the difference in pipe diameter, these can be purchased at your local auto parts store. Tip: When using the mounting pipe as part of your charge pipes I have found that the most ideal placement is right around the battery where the charge pipes penetrate the sheet metal. 15
    • 16. Connect the vacuum lines. Find the fuel pressure regulator (see repair manual) find the vacuum line that is attached to the FPR. Disconnect the vacuum line and install a vacuum “tee” (these can be purchased at your local auto parts store.). Using extra vacuum line, connect one end of the tee to the nipple on the BOV, and one end of the T back to the FPR. When standing in front of the car looking at the engine, you will notice that there are 3 vacuum nipples just above the throttle body on the passenger side of the intake manifold. The nipple closest to the firewall will no longer be in use due to the removal of the old air intake assembly. Connect a vacuum line from this nipple, to the nipple on the waste gate actuator. (The “spaceship” looking device bolted to the turbochargers compressor housing). If you have a boost gauge, you will need one more vacuum tee. You can tee off almost any vacuum source.17. At this point you should be able to start the car. Fill it with oil and Let it idle for a few minutes and check for Check engine lights (CEL) if you get a check engine light proceed to pull the diagnostic code. To do this, consult your repair manual. In the rare event that you have a CEL please consult www.cb7tuner.com www.accordtuner.com or Instant message “Ocean of Awesum” on AIM. Have the diagnostic code ready. After the car idles for a few minuets, check for leaks of any kind, if there are no leaks, shut the car off. Note: You may get an o2 sensor CEL due to the lack of downpipe connecting to the exhaust, thus giving the o2 sensor nothing to read. Do not worry about this yet. 16
    • 18. The car should now be completely drivable. Bring the car to any local exhaust shop to have the downpipe made. Usually the bigger diameter the better. An easy way to connect the downpipe to the turbo is to find a junked DSM and steal the downpipe flange from it. Have your downpipe welded to this flange and bolt it to the o2 housing. If the location of your stock o2 sensor becomes an issue, it can easily be moved to the new DSM o2 housing. However the wires will need to be lengthened to reach. This is actually a more ideal location for the sensor.19. This step is completely optional, but will definitely extend the life of your turbo charger. You will notice that there are 2 unused holes on the center section of the turbo. (where the oil feed and return to connect.) These holes lead to the coolant jacket. The turbocharger reaches extremely high temperatures during operation which could boil the oil flowing through it causing what is known as “coking”. This is a grungy residue left behind by boiled oil. It is absolutely no good for the turbo. To help prevent coking, run coolant through the turbo. On the throttle body you will notice a red braided line; this is the throttle body coolant. Disconnect this line from the throttle body. Purchase extra coolant 17
    • hose at your local auto parts store, along with two barbedfittings that thread into the turbo charger and anyadditional connectors you will need. Run the throttle bodycoolant to one side of the coolant jacket (which side is notvery important). Then, from the turbo, run another coolantline back to the original position of the coolant line on thethrottle body. Here you are basically making a “loop”through the turbo with coolant. 18