Ces Ed Tech Presentation 5 26

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Clicker presentation to LDS Church Ed Tech committee

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  • Note article that tied the 7 principles to clicker technology (
  • Edmonds and Edmonds, lower-hanging fruit
  • Ces Ed Tech Presentation 5 26

    1. 1. Clicker Technology for CES Ed Tech Committee<br />Jason Crandall<br />Doctoral Student<br />Educational Psychology<br />The University of Texas at Austin<br />
    2. 2. Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education<br />Encourages Student-Faculty Contact<br />Encourages Cooperation Among Students<br />Encourages Active Learning<br />Gives Prompt Feedback<br />Emphasizes Time on Task<br />Communicates High Expectations<br />Respects Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning<br /> (Chickering & Gamson, 1987)<br />
    3. 3. What does research say?<br />Small to moderate gains in student engagement (Caldwell, 2007)<br />Small gains in learning (Mayer, Stull et al., 2009; Morling, McAuliffe et al., 2008)<br />Largest learning gains for students in the bottom quartile. The study found evidence that clickers helped low-GPA students without having a negative effect on high-GPA students (Edmonds & Edmonds, 2008)<br />No student learning increase, but increased student interest & self-reported increased learning (Bunce, Vandenplas, & Havanki, 2006)<br />The anonymity, instant feedback, and flexibility of clickers allows a much broader range of implementation options than previous generations had (DeBourgh 2008) <br />
    4. 4. Clicker Affordance<br />Promotes Active Learning<br />Increases Instructor-to-Student & Student-to- Student Interactions<br />Promotes Student Engagement<br />Anonymity Encourages Responding<br />Provides Feedback<br />Student Awareness of Misconceptions<br />Instructor Awareness of Misconceptions<br />Allows Instructor to Alter Teaching (Agile Teaching)<br />
    5. 5.
    6. 6.
    7. 7. Research Questions<br />RQ1: What is the effect on student engagement of asking comprehension questions during a lecture?<br />RQ2: What is the effect on student engagement of using clickers during a lecture?<br />RQ3: To the extent that either comprehension questions or clicker use during lectures increase student engagement, is there an associated effect on student learning?<br />Study held instruction content and approach as constant as possible, changing only if questions were asked during the lecture and if they were answered with clickers.<br />
    8. 8. Method<br />Groups: Control (n= 50), Question (n=46), Clicker (n=46)<br />Measures: Post-test, self-report, and screensaver<br />
    9. 9. Results<br />***p=.000, α=.05<br />Even though the study controlled for identical pedagogy between the Question and Clicker groups, subjects using clickers responded to the secondary stimulus five times as slowly as subjects in either of the other groups.<br />
    10. 10. Challenges…<br />Time consuming<br />Technical issues<br />Time (questions) to prepare<br />Price of clickers<br />Lack of technological knowledge for seminary teachings<br />How will it work in a pass/fail system?<br />Other<br />Questions/responses- jcrandall1027@gmail.com <br />

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