Comparative study

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Comparative study

  1. 1. Comparative andNon-comparative study<br />Done by: AbeerALMaawali 82910<br />AmalALHosni 82931<br />
  2. 2. Comparative study<br />Link:  http://tiny.cc/9gyvr<br />Title: “A case study of the in-class use of a video game for teaching high school history”<br />Purpose: The purpose of this study was to understand teacher and student experiences with and perspectives on the in-class use of an educational video game.<br />
  3. 3. Comparative study<br />Instruments: Observation, focus group and individual interviews, and document analysis.<br />Participants: Four of the teacher’s classes were observed, each composed of approximately 25 students, with a total of 98.<br />
  4. 4. Comparative study<br />Findings:<br /><ul><li>Results showed that the use of the video game resulted in a shift from a traditional teacher-centered learning environment to a student-centered environment where the students were much more active and engaged.
  5. 5. Also, the teacher had evolved implementation strategies based on his past experiences using the game to maximize the focus on learning.</li></li></ul><li> Non-comparative study<br />Link:  http://tiny.cc/1dq79<br />Title: “The impact of individual differences on e-learning system satisfaction: A contingency approach”<br />Purpose: This study investigated the impact of contingent variables on the relationship between four predictors and students’ satisfaction with e-learning.<br />
  6. 6. Non-comparative study<br />Instruments: A survey questionnaire.<br />Participants: 522 university students from 10 intact classes engaging in online instruction were asked to answer questionnaires about their learning styles, perceptions of the quality of the proposed predictors and satisfaction with e-learning systems.<br />
  7. 7. Non-comparative study<br />Findings:<br /><ul><li>Resultsshowed that two contingent variables, gender and job status, significantly influenced the perceptions of predictors and students’ satisfaction with the e-learning system.
  8. 8. This study also found a statistically significant moderating effect of two contingent variables, student job status and learning styles, on the relationship between predictors and e-learning system satisfaction.</li>

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