February 22, 2011 Jason Haislmaier [email_address] @haislmaier Denver  Boulder  Colorado Springs  Dublin  London  Los Ange...
This presentation is intended for general informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice or legal...
Intellectual Property is everywhere  What is it? Why should I care?
Control Value Sharing Protection Opportunity
 
Conscious  choices In   support   of your  business goals   To tell your  story
Angel  funding Alpha Beta/Evaluation Gen 1 Product  definition Product  development Product refinement/ new versions Serie...
Ownership is  key Centralize  ownership   Capture  value
 
 
Know the  tools Know how to  use them
Trademarks Brand  Identity Patents Ideas and  Inventions Trade Secrets “ Know-How” Copyrights Creative Expressions
Trade Secrets “ Know-How”
<ul><li>Attributes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not generally known or readily available </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Independent e...
Trade Secrets Trade  secrets Easily  obtained Easily  lost
Trade Secrets Once the  secrecy is gone   The  trade secret is gone
Trade Secrets Quite  common NDAs Often  overlooked Not  all created  equal Do not take them for granted
<ul><li>Purpose  </li></ul><ul><li>Scope of use and disclosure </li></ul><ul><li>Procedures and controls </li></ul><ul><li...
Trade Secrets
Trade Secrets NDAs Do you  need one? What if the other side  won’t sign one?
<ul><li>Acquisition, disclosure, or use in breach of a duty to maintain secrecy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improper means to ac...
Patents Ideas and  Inventions
<ul><li>Cover largely the same thing as trade secrets </li></ul><ul><li>Grants a legal “monopoly” over the covered inventi...
<ul><li>Many early stage companies rely on “provisional” applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One-year grace period before f...
Patents Provisional Patent Application Actual Patent Application Issued U.S. Patent Invention
Key Concern  U.S. patent system is  “first-to-invent” Most all others are  “first-to-file” Patents
U.S. Patent  Filing  “Bar date” One-year  following first publication or  One-year   following first attempt to commercial...
Non-U.S. Patent  Filing  “Bar date” Following first publication or  Following first attempt to commercialize Patents
First Public Use,  Disclosure, Sale, or  Offer for Sale Statutory “Bar Date” (Filing Deadline  for U.S. Application) One-y...
Non-U.S. Filing “Bar Date” Non-U.S. Application Filing Deadline One-year grace period from U.S. application filing  to fil...
Non-U.S. Filing “Bar Date” Non-U.S. Application Filing Non-U.S.  application  filed within one-year of U.S. application  b...
Are patents evil? Why patents? Patents
Patents Defensive Offensive Optics Ego  Revenue
Patents Patent “Troll” Secondary Market
Is it patentable? “ Anything under the sun made by man” Not “if” but how strong Patents
Patents Invention
Are  business methods  and software  still patentable? Patents
Yes, but. . . Patents Bilski Bilski v. Kappos, 561 U.S. ___ (2010)  June 28, 2010
The  “Bilski”  Issue Still Protectable? Definitely Protectable Likely Not Protectable Patents Method for producing machine...
<ul><li>“ Machine-or-Transformation Test” </li></ul><ul><li>tied to a particular machine or apparatus, or  </li></ul><ul><...
<ul><li>Owner  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Patents issued to the named inventors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inventors can assign...
<ul><li>Infringement requires making, using, or selling in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Two types of Infringement </li></ul>...
Lack of knowledge  is no defense to infringement Patents
Copyrights Creative Expressions
<ul><li>Creation requires: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Original work of authorship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed in any tangi...
Copyrights Creative  expressions Not ideas Copyrights
<ul><li>Either registered or unregistered </li></ul><ul><li>Unregistered = Immediate Existence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Copyr...
<ul><li>Two types of infringement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Actual copying (verbatim copies) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access...
“ DMCA” Digital Millennium Copyright Act Copyrights
<ul><li>Enacted largely in response to fears of the content industry </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital format made copying eas...
Copyrights War Hollywood Silicon Valley
Reverse-engineering Hacking
<ul><li>Focus on circumvention of technological measures used by a copyright owner to control  access  to their work </li>...
UGC User-Generated Content
<ul><li>Provides safe harbors for Online Service Providers (OSPs) against direct and contributory liability for copyright ...
Public Domain Very limited
If I pay for it, do I own it?
If they don’t pay for it, do I own it? Not Necessarily!
Trademarks Brand  Identity
<ul><li>Identify the source of origin of goods/services  </li></ul><ul><li>Either registered or unregistered form  </li></...
All Marks Are  Not  Created Equal Stronger Protection Weaker Protection No Protection facial tissue   computer software Ce...
<ul><li>Ownership  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Party who first uses the mark (U.S.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Party who submits...
IP is everywhere Not if IP is valuable to your business How valuable IP is to your business
Make each  choice an  informed and conscious  choice
Thank you.   Jason Haislmaier Email:  [email_address] Twitter:  @haislmaier LinkedIn:   http://www.linkedin.com/in/haislma...
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2011 Silicon Flatirons IP (Crash Course) For Entrepreneurers

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Intellectual Property Crash Course for Entrepreneurs (February 22, 2011) presentation at the Wolf Law Building at the University of Colorado (Boulder, CO)

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  • Not to be confused with the one-year grace period for filing U.S. application under Section 102(b).
  • 2011 Silicon Flatirons IP (Crash Course) For Entrepreneurers

    1. 1. February 22, 2011 Jason Haislmaier [email_address] @haislmaier Denver Boulder Colorado Springs Dublin London Los Angeles Phoenix Salt Lake City San Francisco
    2. 2. This presentation is intended for general informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances, nor is it intended to address specific legal compliance issues that may arise in particular circumstances. Please consult counsel concerning your own situation and any specific legal questions you may have. The thoughts and opinions expressed in this presentation are those of the individual presenters and do not necessarily reflect the official or unofficial thoughts or opinions of their employers. For further information regarding this presentation, please contact the presenter(s) listed in the presentation. Unless otherwise noted, all original content in this presentation is licensed under the Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us .
    3. 3. Intellectual Property is everywhere What is it? Why should I care?
    4. 4. Control Value Sharing Protection Opportunity
    5. 6. Conscious choices In support of your business goals To tell your story
    6. 7. Angel funding Alpha Beta/Evaluation Gen 1 Product definition Product development Product refinement/ new versions Series A Friends & Family funding Founders Product development and support Sales and marketing Direct sales Partner/Channel sales NDAs Employee and Contractor Agreements Initial invention disclosures Follow-on disclosures Patent filings Patent filings Patent filings US TM filing Foreign TM filing DMCA Registration US TM filing DMCA Registration Employee and Contractor Agreements Gen 2 Initial invention disclosures
    7. 8. Ownership is key Centralize ownership Capture value
    8. 11. Know the tools Know how to use them
    9. 12. Trademarks Brand Identity Patents Ideas and Inventions Trade Secrets “ Know-How” Copyrights Creative Expressions
    10. 13. Trade Secrets “ Know-How”
    11. 14. <ul><li>Attributes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not generally known or readily available </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Independent economic value </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reasonable efforts to maintain secrecy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Virtually any type of data or information </li></ul><ul><li>Type or form of information is irrelevant </li></ul><ul><li>Not registered, but still a form of property (like any other form of IP) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Licensable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assignable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Able to be abandoned </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Created and enforced largely through contracts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nondisclosure agreements (NDAs) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employee and contractor agreements </li></ul></ul>Trade Secrets General Information
    12. 15. Trade Secrets Trade secrets Easily obtained Easily lost
    13. 16. Trade Secrets Once the secrecy is gone The trade secret is gone
    14. 17. Trade Secrets Quite common NDAs Often overlooked Not all created equal Do not take them for granted
    15. 18. <ul><li>Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Scope of use and disclosure </li></ul><ul><li>Procedures and controls </li></ul><ul><li>Duration of protection </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership </li></ul><ul><li>Return of information </li></ul><ul><li>Remedies </li></ul>Trade Secrets NDAs – Key Concerns
    16. 19. Trade Secrets
    17. 20. Trade Secrets NDAs Do you need one? What if the other side won’t sign one?
    18. 21. <ul><li>Acquisition, disclosure, or use in breach of a duty to maintain secrecy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improper means to acquire </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knew or had reason to know acquired </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Through improper means </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Under duty to maintain secrecy or limit use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>From someone else who had a duty to maintain secrecy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Knew or had reason to know acquired through accident or mistake </li></ul><ul><li>Independent development and reverse engineering </li></ul>Trade Secrets Trade Secret Misappropriation
    19. 22. Patents Ideas and Inventions
    20. 23. <ul><li>Cover largely the same thing as trade secrets </li></ul><ul><li>Grants a legal “monopoly” over the covered invention in exchange for full disclosure of the invention </li></ul><ul><li>The right to exclude others from making, using, or selling the covered invention - not the right to make, use, or sell </li></ul><ul><li>Invention must be new, useful, and non-obvious </li></ul><ul><li>Patents exist only in registered form </li></ul><ul><li>Must file a patent application with the USPTO </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provisional Patent Application </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Utility Patent Application </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Patent applications are not enforceable until the patent issues </li></ul><ul><li>Once issued, provides 20 years of protection from the date of filing of the initial application </li></ul>General Information Patents
    21. 24. <ul><li>Many early stage companies rely on “provisional” applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One-year grace period before filing regular application </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quicker? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less expensive? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Risks exist </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regular application limited to what is captured in the provisional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limitations in the provisional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The “Power Point” provisional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New matter developed after the provisional is filed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Must file the regular application within the year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A good patent attorney can only help so much. . . </li></ul></ul>Provisional Patent Applications Patents
    22. 25. Patents Provisional Patent Application Actual Patent Application Issued U.S. Patent Invention
    23. 26. Key Concern U.S. patent system is “first-to-invent” Most all others are “first-to-file” Patents
    24. 27. U.S. Patent Filing “Bar date” One-year following first publication or One-year following first attempt to commercialize Patents
    25. 28. Non-U.S. Patent Filing “Bar date” Following first publication or Following first attempt to commercialize Patents
    26. 29. First Public Use, Disclosure, Sale, or Offer for Sale Statutory “Bar Date” (Filing Deadline for U.S. Application) One-year grace period from public use/disclosure of invention to file U.S. application U.S. Filing “Bar Date” Patents 12/7/10 12/7/11
    27. 30. Non-U.S. Filing “Bar Date” Non-U.S. Application Filing Deadline One-year grace period from U.S. application filing to file foreign patent application U.S. Application Filed (Includes provisional applications) Patents 12/7/10 12/7/11 First Public Use, Disclosure, Sale, or Offer for Sale
    28. 31. Non-U.S. Filing “Bar Date” Non-U.S. Application Filing Non-U.S. application filed within one-year of U.S. application but not within grace period First Public Use, Disclosure, Sale, or Offer for Sale 12/7/10 12/7/11 Patents U.S. application filed within grace period U.S. Application Filed (Includes provisional applications)
    29. 32. Are patents evil? Why patents? Patents
    30. 33. Patents Defensive Offensive Optics Ego Revenue
    31. 34. Patents Patent “Troll” Secondary Market
    32. 35. Is it patentable? “ Anything under the sun made by man” Not “if” but how strong Patents
    33. 36. Patents Invention
    34. 37. Are business methods and software still patentable? Patents
    35. 38. Yes, but. . . Patents Bilski Bilski v. Kappos, 561 U.S. ___ (2010) June 28, 2010
    36. 39. The “Bilski” Issue Still Protectable? Definitely Protectable Likely Not Protectable Patents Method for producing machine tools Abstract business methods Software-implemented business methods Software
    37. 40. <ul><li>“ Machine-or-Transformation Test” </li></ul><ul><li>tied to a particular machine or apparatus, or </li></ul><ul><li>transform a particular article into a different state or thing. </li></ul>Patents The “Bilski” Issue
    38. 41. <ul><li>Owner </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Patents issued to the named inventors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inventors can assign rights to employer or other third party </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Joint ownership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Joint owners owe no obligations to other owners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contrast with copyright </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Assignments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Entire patent or an undivided interest </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be in writing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Licenses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Any owner may grant a nonexclusive license </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exclusive licenses only by agreement of all owners </li></ul></ul>Ownership and Transfer Patents
    39. 42. <ul><li>Infringement requires making, using, or selling in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Two types of Infringement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Literal infringement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Infringement of each and every element of a patent claim </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Doctrine of equivalents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Using substantially the same means </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In substantially the same way </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>To obtain substantially the same result as the patented device or process </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>No defense of independent development </li></ul><ul><li>No defense of lack of knowledge </li></ul>Patent Infringement Patents
    40. 43. Lack of knowledge is no defense to infringement Patents
    41. 44. Copyrights Creative Expressions
    42. 45. <ul><li>Creation requires: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Original work of authorship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixed in any tangible medium </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>From which work can be perceived (directly or with machine) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Virtually anything with at least some creativity recorded on any medium (electronic or otherwise) </li></ul><ul><li>Copyright protects the expression of an idea, not the idea itself </li></ul><ul><li>Provides five exclusive rights: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reproduce copies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepare derivative works </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public distribution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public display </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Rights are fully divisible </li></ul>General Information Copyrights
    43. 46. Copyrights Creative expressions Not ideas Copyrights
    44. 47. <ul><li>Either registered or unregistered </li></ul><ul><li>Unregistered = Immediate Existence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Copyright comes into being as soon as original work fixed in tangible medium </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Registration is generally not burdensome </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits of registration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Statutory damages and attorneys’ fees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prima facie evidence of copyrightability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shifts burden of proof </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Federal court </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No notice required </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Since March 1, 1989, notice ( ©) is no longer required (although it is desirable) </li></ul></ul>Creation and Protection Copyrights
    45. 48. <ul><li>Two types of infringement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Actual copying (verbatim copies) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access plus substantial similarity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Any or all of the five exclusive rights can be infringed </li></ul><ul><li>Independent creation </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of access </li></ul>Infringement Copyrights
    46. 49. “ DMCA” Digital Millennium Copyright Act Copyrights
    47. 50. <ul><li>Enacted largely in response to fears of the content industry </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital format made copying easy and cheap </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Existing copyright law provided ineffective protections against piracy of copyrighted works </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Creates several primary areas of focus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Legal protection against circumvention of technological protection measures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Safe harbors from copyright infringement for “online service providers” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other areas (less prominent, but equally important) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Highly controversial </li></ul>DMCA Copyrights
    48. 51. Copyrights War Hollywood Silicon Valley
    49. 52. Reverse-engineering Hacking
    50. 53. <ul><li>Focus on circumvention of technological measures used by a copyright owner to control access to their work </li></ul><ul><li>Targets both the act circumventing access controls and trafficking in circumvention tools </li></ul><ul><li>Neither requires that an infringing copy of the work have been made </li></ul><ul><li>Technology-neutral </li></ul><ul><li>Some limited exceptions (e.g., some forms of reverse engineering) </li></ul>DMCA – Anti-Circumvention and Trafficking Copyrights
    51. 54. UGC User-Generated Content
    52. 55. <ul><li>Provides safe harbors for Online Service Providers (OSPs) against direct and contributory liability for copyright infringement </li></ul><ul><li>Primary safe harbor relates to user-posted materials </li></ul><ul><li>Minimal requirements (and who says nothing is free. . .) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designation of an agent for service under the DMCA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Compliance with the specific “notice and takedown” procedures in the DMCA </li></ul></ul>DMCA – Safe Harbor Copyrights
    53. 56. Public Domain Very limited
    54. 57. If I pay for it, do I own it?
    55. 58. If they don’t pay for it, do I own it? Not Necessarily!
    56. 59. Trademarks Brand Identity
    57. 60. <ul><li>Identify the source of origin of goods/services </li></ul><ul><li>Either registered or unregistered form </li></ul><ul><li>Unregistered = Use </li></ul><ul><li>Registration requires filing </li></ul><ul><li>Types of registrations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Trademarks – goods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service marks – services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collective marks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Certification marks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Territorial protection </li></ul><ul><li>First to use (U.S.) v. first to file </li></ul><ul><li>Intent to Use (with later showing of actual use) </li></ul>General Information Trademarks
    58. 61. All Marks Are Not Created Equal Stronger Protection Weaker Protection No Protection facial tissue computer software Cellophane Margarine Escalator Aspirin Trademarks Descriptive Generic Fanciful Suggestive Arbitrary
    59. 62. <ul><li>Ownership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Party who first uses the mark (U.S.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Party who submits application for registration </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Infringement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Likelihood of confusion, not actual confusion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Likely to cause confusion, mistake, or deception </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Independent use is not a defense </li></ul></ul>Ownership and Infringement Trademarks
    60. 63. IP is everywhere Not if IP is valuable to your business How valuable IP is to your business
    61. 64. Make each choice an informed and conscious choice
    62. 65. Thank you. Jason Haislmaier Email: [email_address] Twitter: @haislmaier LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/haislmaier

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