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Customization & designing art worx day1 Customization & designing art worx day1 Presentation Transcript

  • Customization & Designing
    Tips & Tricks
    Day(1)
    Hesham S.Aly
    SSE
  • Who am I ?
    • I work for ITWorx.
    • SSE , SharePoint PFE , Specialist & Evangelist.
    • MCP , MCTS & MCM.
    • SharePoint ERA , Founder.
    • Principal contributor & Author @ :
    MSSharePointTips.com , Innovation-Hut,
    theSug.org & MSDN Forums.
    hesham.saad@itworx.comwww.heshamsaad.tk
    Hesham Saad Aly
    Hesham Saad
    @Hsaad
  • Agenda :
    • Day (1) :
    • MS – SharePoint Designer Overview 5 min
    • SPD 2010 new features 30 min
    • Codeless Control via SPD 2010 (Branding Planning) 30 min
    • Tips & Tricks + Demo’s 2 hrs
    • Q & A 30 min
    • Day (2) :
    • InfoPath 2010 Overview
    • MS - InfoPath designer and filler 2010 3 hrs
    • Demo’s
    • Q & A 30 min
  • Quick Survey …
    • How many of you love using SharePoint Designer 2007 to build their
    applications?
    • What are the pain points you have seen using SPD 2007?
    • Unstable
    • Difficult to package and deploy applications built in SPD.
    • Doesn’t fit into an ALM “App Life cycle Mang” process.
    • Too many actions can only be done in the browser.
    • Messes with your HTML.
    • Slow.
  • MS – SharePoint Designer Overview :
    Evolution of SharePoint Designer …
    “SPD 2010 is not compatible with SPD 2007”
    SharePoint Designer 2010 only connects to SharePoint 2010. To connect to SharePoint 2007 and earlier sites you must continue to use SharePoint Designer 2007. If you elect to install both applications side-by-side, you must download the 32-bit version of SharePoint Designer 2010, and install it after installing SharePoint Designer 2007. Please also note that 64 bit Office applications will not run if SharePoint Designer 2007 is installed; 64-bit Office 2010 applications should only be used if not connecting to SharePoint 2007 servers.
    • SPD is THE tool for building codeless (NO-CODE) Powerful composite applications on top of SharePoint.
    • Get it free at www.microsoft.com/spd (X-32 & 64 bit)
    • What’s New ?
    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint-designer-help/whats-new-in-sharepoint-designer-2010-HA010370728.aspx
    • Backstage & Redesigned UI:
    (file tab , site summary page , navigation pane , gallery pages , summary pages , list and content type editors , Ribbon , zoom to contents , all files view , … etc. )
    • Views & Forms:
    (XSLT list view web part , Shared XSLT templates mean cleaner code & better performance ,revert XSLT , Custom Actions , InfoPath forms , … etc. )
    • Workflows:
    (reusable workflows , export workflows , association columns , associate workflows with content type, site workflows , sub steps and new workflows actions)
    • Control where & how people can use SharePoint Designer 2010.
    • External Content types & BCS.
  • Customization & Branding
    2010
    - Examples : News , Bulletins , FAQ , … etc Via XSL.
    2007
  • One of the most useful technologies to know when customizing SharePoint sites is XSLT (eXtensibleStyleSheet Language Transforms). This post will highlight a number of topics specific to XSLT customization with SharePoint. Some topics may be further explored in future blog posts.
    What is XSLT?
    XSLT is a declarative language for performing XML document conversions. XSLT allows you to format structured data (XML) with powerful stylesheets (XSL), to generate a brand-new XML document.
    In short, it allows you to separate data from presentation. Common uses for XSLT include website content creation, end-user configuration, and document conversion.
    XSLT is interpreted, not compiled. This means that you can change XSLT files in custom solutions without having to recompile and re-deploy assemblies.
    Why XSLT?
    SharePoint relies on XSLT to generate the majority of its dynamic content. Everything from lists to search results to RSS feeds is internally powered by XSL transformations. Some of these are obvious (the Content Query Web Part and Data View Web Part). But some are subtle (Search Results web parts, Business Data Catalog web parts).
    You may be surprised to learn that XSLT is used extensively throughout SharePoint. From There are many situations where XSLT is the best option:
    Skinning XML without "reinventing the wheel"
    Making small changes without compiling code
    Exposing configuration options to end users without letting them touch application code
    There are also situations where XSLT is the only option:
    Smaller deployments of SharePoint Online (BPOS) don't support custom assemblies, but they do support XSLT
    Users with limited SharePoint access may be prohibited from deploying custom executables, but still be permitted to tweak XSLT
    Some vendors provide XML data over web services which need to be presented in the browser through Javascript (AJAX), making XSLT the only viable choice
    SharePoint's XSLT implementation
    WSS and MOSS 3.0 are both built atop the .NET 2.0 framework, which implements XSLT 1.0 within the System.Xml.Xsl library. This is important to note because SharePoint 2007's XSLT functionality is only as powerful as .NET 2.0's.
    As of March 2009, Microsoft has not announced support for XSLT 2.0, so it is not expected within .NET 4.0. That said, the next version of SharePoint (14) will almost definitely be limited to XSLT 1.0.
    Also note that some tools use XSLT on the client-side using Javascript. Internet Explorer performs those transformations using a separate library (MSXML). The MSXML 4.0 library is also limited to XSLT 1.0 and Microsoft has announced that future versions will also be limited to 1.0.
    Where XSLT is used
    As previously mentioned, XSLT is used extensively throughout the SharePoint ecosystem. The majority of out-of-box web parts rely on it, including list and document library views.
    Each site collection in SharePoint has a special document library called "XSL Style Sheets" (within the "Style Library"). The easiest way to explore these documents is using SharePoint Designer. This library contains a handful of pre-built XSL stylesheets that drive the system's look and feel:
    Header.xsl: column header and grouping styles
    ItemStyle.xsl: main stylesheet for controlling DIV- and TR (row)-level styling
    ContentQueryMain.xsl: overall structure of Content Query Web Parts
    LevelStyle.xsl: uses in various places
    RSS.xsl: default look of RSS Feed Web Parts
    SummaryLinkMain.xsl: structure for Summary Link Web Parts
    TableOfContents.xsl: used in the Table of Contents Web Part
    Many web parts default to relying exclusively on these stylesheets. However, all styles can be overridden. There are three basic ways to customize a web part's XSLT:
    Edit the pre-built XSL file within "XSL Style Sheets" This is the quickest and dirtiest option, but also the one I'd least recommend since it customizes (unghosts) SharePoint's stylesheets.
    Be aware that many websites suggest this route. It's easy, but not scalable.
    Edit the web part's XSL directly within its properties
    By exporting a web part to its serialized .DWP or .WEBPART file, you can manually edit all of its properties. You might be surprised how many settings are available when working directly with a .WEBPART file. This approach has the major advantage of being self-contained. If you style a web part without referencing external files, you are guaranteed that it will work the same way on other machines.
    Build and reference a custom XSL file Perhaps the best option, building your own XSL stylesheet puts you in total control and allows for easy migration. You can build an XSL file in Visual Studio as part of your feature or solution and thus keep styling within source control.
    Keep in mind that you don't need to start from scratch; copying existing templates (such as ItemStyle.xsl) is a great way to start.
    This is a complex topic, but there are a few great blog posts that can help you get started:
    Microsoft ECM Team Blog: Configuring and Customizing the CQWP
    Heather Solomon: Customizing the CQWP and Custom Item Styles
    Brendon Schwartz: Connecting the CQWP without changing ItemStyle.xsl
    SharePoint-Specific XSLT Libraries
    The XSLT spec allows for third-party functionality to be added through extension objects. Microsoft anticipated some SharePoint-specific template requirements and included two powerful custom libraries (I'm not sure what either acronym stands for.):
    DDWRT Namespace Provides dozens of useful end-user functions such as IsPrivilegedUser() (for determining if working with an administrator), UserLookup() (for mapping usernames with data such as email addresses).
    I touched on the DDWRT namespace and URLEncode function in a previous blog post.
    CMSWRT NameSpace This little-documented extension provides a number of internal utilities. Rarely will you directly interact with the CMSWRT namespace, but it does include some useful functions such as RegisterFeedURL and EnsureIsAllowedProtocol.
    Other uses for XSLT with SharePoint
    There are countless ways to utilize XSLT in SharePoint besides tweaking web parts. You can render vendor data on the client through AJAX. You can also create cool, extensible slideshows with Silverlight. You can even convert between Word documents and InfoPath forms programmatically. The options are limitless.
    Resources for learning XSLT
    The best book I've found for truly understanding the subject is XLST 2.0 and XPath 2.0 Programmer's Reference by Michael Kay (editor of the W3C XSLT 2.0 spec).
    There are also some good online tutorials:
    W3C Presentation on XSLT and XPath
    W3Schools' Intro to XSLT
    ZVON.Org's XSLT Reference
    XSLT …
    - XSL stands for Extensible Style sheet Language, and is a style sheet language for XML documents.
    - XSLT stands for XSL Transformations. We use XSLT to transform XML documents into other formats, like XHTML.
    EX: http://www.w3schools.com/xsl/
    <?xml version="1.0"?>=<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0“xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"><xsl:template match="/">  <html>  <body>    <h2>My CD Collection</h2>    <table border="1">      <trbgcolor="#9acd32">        <th>Title</th>        <th>Artist</th>      </tr>      <xsl:for-each select="catalog/cd">        <tr>          <td><xsl:value-of select="title"/></td>          <td><xsl:value-of select="artist"/></td>        </tr>      </xsl:for-each>    </table>  </body>  </html></xsl:template></xsl:stylesheet>
  • One of the most useful technologies to know when customizing SharePoint sites is XSLT (eXtensibleStyleSheet Language Transforms). This post will highlight a number of topics specific to XSLT customization with SharePoint. Some topics may be further explored in future blog posts.
    What is XSLT?
    XSLT is a declarative language for performing XML document conversions. XSLT allows you to format structured data (XML) with powerful stylesheets (XSL), to generate a brand-new XML document.
    In short, it allows you to separate data from presentation. Common uses for XSLT include website content creation, end-user configuration, and document conversion.
    XSLT is interpreted, not compiled. This means that you can change XSLT files in custom solutions without having to recompile and re-deploy assemblies.
    Why XSLT?
    SharePoint relies on XSLT to generate the majority of its dynamic content. Everything from lists to search results to RSS feeds is internally powered by XSL transformations. Some of these are obvious (the Content Query Web Part and Data View Web Part). But some are subtle (Search Results web parts, Business Data Catalog web parts).
    You may be surprised to learn that XSLT is used extensively throughout SharePoint. From There are many situations where XSLT is the best option:
    Skinning XML without "reinventing the wheel"
    Making small changes without compiling code
    Exposing configuration options to end users without letting them touch application code
    There are also situations where XSLT is the only option:
    Smaller deployments of SharePoint Online (BPOS) don't support custom assemblies, but they do support XSLT
    Users with limited SharePoint access may be prohibited from deploying custom executables, but still be permitted to tweak XSLT
    Some vendors provide XML data over web services which need to be presented in the browser through Javascript (AJAX), making XSLT the only viable choice
    SharePoint's XSLT implementation
    WSS and MOSS 3.0 are both built atop the .NET 2.0 framework, which implements XSLT 1.0 within the System.Xml.Xsl library. This is important to note because SharePoint 2007's XSLT functionality is only as powerful as .NET 2.0's.
    As of March 2009, Microsoft has not announced support for XSLT 2.0, so it is not expected within .NET 4.0. That said, the next version of SharePoint (14) will almost definitely be limited to XSLT 1.0.
    Also note that some tools use XSLT on the client-side using Javascript. Internet Explorer performs those transformations using a separate library (MSXML). The MSXML 4.0 library is also limited to XSLT 1.0 and Microsoft has announced that future versions will also be limited to 1.0.
    Where XSLT is used
    As previously mentioned, XSLT is used extensively throughout the SharePoint ecosystem. The majority of out-of-box web parts rely on it, including list and document library views.
    Each site collection in SharePoint has a special document library called "XSL Style Sheets" (within the "Style Library"). The easiest way to explore these documents is using SharePoint Designer. This library contains a handful of pre-built XSL stylesheets that drive the system's look and feel:
    Header.xsl: column header and grouping styles
    ItemStyle.xsl: main stylesheet for controlling DIV- and TR (row)-level styling
    ContentQueryMain.xsl: overall structure of Content Query Web Parts
    LevelStyle.xsl: uses in various places
    RSS.xsl: default look of RSS Feed Web Parts
    SummaryLinkMain.xsl: structure for Summary Link Web Parts
    TableOfContents.xsl: used in the Table of Contents Web Part
    Many web parts default to relying exclusively on these stylesheets. However, all styles can be overridden. There are three basic ways to customize a web part's XSLT:
    Edit the pre-built XSL file within "XSL Style Sheets" This is the quickest and dirtiest option, but also the one I'd least recommend since it customizes (unghosts) SharePoint's stylesheets.
    Be aware that many websites suggest this route. It's easy, but not scalable.
    Edit the web part's XSL directly within its properties
    By exporting a web part to its serialized .DWP or .WEBPART file, you can manually edit all of its properties. You might be surprised how many settings are available when working directly with a .WEBPART file. This approach has the major advantage of being self-contained. If you style a web part without referencing external files, you are guaranteed that it will work the same way on other machines.
    Build and reference a custom XSL file Perhaps the best option, building your own XSL stylesheet puts you in total control and allows for easy migration. You can build an XSL file in Visual Studio as part of your feature or solution and thus keep styling within source control.
    Keep in mind that you don't need to start from scratch; copying existing templates (such as ItemStyle.xsl) is a great way to start.
    This is a complex topic, but there are a few great blog posts that can help you get started:
    Microsoft ECM Team Blog: Configuring and Customizing the CQWP
    Heather Solomon: Customizing the CQWP and Custom Item Styles
    Brendon Schwartz: Connecting the CQWP without changing ItemStyle.xsl
    SharePoint-Specific XSLT Libraries
    The XSLT spec allows for third-party functionality to be added through extension objects. Microsoft anticipated some SharePoint-specific template requirements and included two powerful custom libraries (I'm not sure what either acronym stands for.):
    DDWRT Namespace Provides dozens of useful end-user functions such as IsPrivilegedUser() (for determining if working with an administrator), UserLookup() (for mapping usernames with data such as email addresses).
    I touched on the DDWRT namespace and URLEncode function in a previous blog post.
    CMSWRT NameSpace This little-documented extension provides a number of internal utilities. Rarely will you directly interact with the CMSWRT namespace, but it does include some useful functions such as RegisterFeedURL and EnsureIsAllowedProtocol.
    Other uses for XSLT with SharePoint
    There are countless ways to utilize XSLT in SharePoint besides tweaking web parts. You can render vendor data on the client through AJAX. You can also create cool, extensible slideshows with Silverlight. You can even convert between Word documents and InfoPath forms programmatically. The options are limitless.
    Resources for learning XSLT
    The best book I've found for truly understanding the subject is XLST 2.0 and XPath 2.0 Programmer's Reference by Michael Kay (editor of the W3C XSLT 2.0 spec).
    There are also some good online tutorials:
    W3C Presentation on XSLT and XPath
    W3Schools' Intro to XSLT
    ZVON.Org's XSLT Reference
    Quick hints (XSLT) …
    • In short, XSLT allows you to separate data from presentation .
    • XSLT is interpreted, not compiled. This means that you can change XSLT files in custom solutions without having to recompile and re-deploy assemblies.
    • SharePoint relies on XSLT to generate the majority of its dynamic content. Everything from lists to search results to RSS feeds is internally powered by XSL transformations. Some of these are obvious (the Content Query Web Part and Data View Web Part). But some are subtle (Search Results web parts, Business Data Catalog web parts).
    You may be surprised to learn that XSLT is used extensively throughout
    SharePoint.
    - XSLT is the best option:
    • Skinning XML without "reinventing the wheel"
    • Making small changes without compiling code
    • Exposing configuration options to end users without letting them touch application code
    Learn More : Go tohttp://www.w3.org/TR/xslt
  • Demos
  • - Add News list as XSLTListViewWebpart on a root page via web browser > Then convert to XSLT via SPD.
    - Add News list as "DataFormWebPart" (Empty & not empty) then customize.
    Employees & Departments via SPD "Empty DataForm Webpart" with
    connection.
    - Emps-Deps single list via SPD "Empty DataForm Webpart" with connection and showing duplicate problem sibling.
    - Add webpart "XSLTLVW" from subsite to rootsite via "SOAP services" (Anonymous user issue).
    - Add webpart "XSLTLVW" from subsite to rootsite via export "Add to file" (via : SPD) and import via web browser.
  • - How to :
    Changing list template language.
    Eliminating-large-JS-files-to-optimize. “Http -Modules”.
    Best Practice to create designer friendly server controls :
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sharepointdesigner/archive/2008/10/03/best-practice-to-create-designer-friendly-server-controls.aspx
    4. Restrict SPD at web app & site collections level’s.
    5. SharePoint 2010 Branding and Customization Resources .
    6. Optimize SP 2010 site . “Via SPD 2010 & Add ins : YSlow , Page Speed , …etc.)
    7. How to enable VariationLabelMenu control in SharePoint 2010.
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