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How many medline platforms on the web?

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how many Medline platforms are available on the Web? from PubMed to the latest one, BibliMed.

how many Medline platforms are available on the Web? from PubMed to the latest one, BibliMed.

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  • I really like this slide deck, although I see certain things a little bit differently. For example, I like and prefer Pubmed’s interface and find it very functional, easy to use and easy on my eyes. True, post search filtering would be a welcome addition. I for one am happy that Pubmed shows the latest articles on top and I hate Google for not allowing me to sort as I wish. Want social? Use Mendeley. Scopus is a fine tool but doesn’t do automatic synonym translations, so I’m always worried I may miss literature because I haven’t used the right gene or protein name. And as useful as GOPubmed is, IMHO the interface is a bit cluttered. Not sure sure how useful I find the other tools in daily life...
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How many medline platforms on the web? How many medline platforms on the web? Presentation Transcript

  • Medline: how many platforms on the web? From PubMed to BibliMed [email_address]
  • Outline
    • Medline/PubMed?
    • PubMed: a success or a tragedy?
    • Medline on the market
    • Best Alternatives:
        • GoPubMed, the analyzer
        • Quertle, the language master
        • PubFocus, the journal ranker
        • Pubget, the rush player
        • Biblimed, the smarter
    • Conclusion
      • My Recommendations
    • Sources
  • Outline
    • Medline/PubMed?
    • PubMed: a success or a tragedy?
    • Medline on the market
    • Best Alternatives:
        • GoPubMed, the analyzer
        • Quertle, the language master
        • PubFocus, the journal ranker
        • Pubget, the rush player
        • Biblimed, the smarter
    • Conclusion
      • My Recommendations
    • Sources
    • Medline – ‘The map of medicine’
    Greg Rowell & Dean Giustini. An introduction to Medline for student health librarians. January 14th, 2010. Presentation available on Slideshare Medline Fact Sheet: www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/factsheets/medline.html
    • Created in 1996 by health librarians at the U.S. National Library of Medicine
    • Premier international bibliographic database in biomedicine
      • ~ 20 million citations
      • Journals in 39 languages
      • ~5500 journals indexed 1966-present
      • Majority are scholarly journals + a small number of newspapers, magazines, etc.
      • 83% of articles have English abstracts written by articles’ authors
    • life sciences in scope but concentration in biomedicine
    • ~2,000-4,000 articles added daily , Tuesday to Saturday
    • 700,000 new entries in 2010
    • Historical platform
      • In 1996, has « freed » the medical information (at a time where databases were only available through STN or with CD-ROM)
    • Recent updates:
      • MyNCBI (profile to install alerts)
      • Filters
      • (light) redesign in 2009
      • Free full-text linking: mainly to PubMedCentral
  • Old search box: New search box:
    • Miner, Edward G. Where’d it go? The new Pubmed. October 29, 2009. Presentation on SlideShare
    • Despite a poor look and feel
    • Despite users complains against the search facility
      • it has become more and more challenging for its users to quickly identify information relevant to their individual needs, owing mainly to the ever-growing biomedical literature.
      • As a result, users are often overwhelmed by the long list of search results : over one-third of PubMed queries result in 100 or more citations *
    • Despite superiority of paid services (Scopus, Web of Science, etc.)**
      • If an institution has to make a decision to choose between Scopus and WoS, Scopus would be a better choice for this kind of literature. Since  MEDLINE has found significantly fewer documents than the other two databases, it should be used only when these two databases are not available
    *: Zhiyong Li. PubMed and beyond: a survey of web tools for searching biomedical literature. Database (2011) 2011 **: Baykoucheva, Svetla(2010) ‘Selecting a Database for Drug Literature Retrieval: A Comparison of MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science’, Science & Technology Libraries, 29: 4, 276-288
    • PubMed remains the preferred source of physicians, students and teachers
      • 2009: a billion searches!
        • Means 3,5 millions per day
        • So 40 searches per second!!!!
    • Is free!!
    • Is the historical player (since 1996)
    • Has the priority of indexing
    • Has a Poor interface
    • Has a smaller Index than competitors
    • Is clearly « medical US & high-impact journals » oriented
    Vs
  • Outline
    • Medline/PubMed?
    • PubMed: a success or a tragedy?
    • Medline on the market
    • Best Alternatives:
        • GoPubMed, the analyzer
        • Quertle, the language master
        • PubFocus, the journal ranker
        • Pubget, the rush player
        • Biblimed, the smarter
    • Conclusion
      • My Recommendations
    • Sources
  • A success or a tragedy?*
    • Interface has never evolved (or a little)
      • Still very web 1.0
      • Bad at web 2.0
      • Bad at Web 3.0
    • Search experience is poor:
      • No clustering, no alerts, etc.
      • Ranked by date not by relevance (imagine Google!)
      • Promises of MeSH are under-used (nobody but librarians understand the MeSH!)
    • End-users want PDFs!
      • Linking services are a primary choice
      • 22% of articles in Medicine are available free of charge
      • PubMedCentral attracts 420,000 visitors per day (mainly academics)
    * Inspired by: Duncan Hull. Twenty million papers in PubMed: a triumph or a tragedy? O’Really, Online, posted on July 27, 2010:
  • What users need: find engines not search engines!
  • Outline
    • Medline/PubMed?
    • PubMed: a success or a tragedy?
    • Medline on the market
    • Best Alternatives:
        • GoPubMed, the analyzer
        • Quertle, the language master
        • PubFocus, the journal ranker
        • Pubget, the rush player
        • Biblimed, the smarter
    • Conclusion
      • My Recommendations
    • Sources
    • Featherstone, Robin. PubMed & Beyond. March 23, 2011.
    Are golden ages of PubMed Over?
  • « Medline » On the Market
    • 1999: the first free competitor: PubCrawler
    • 2010: iPubMed
    • 2011: BibliMed
    • In 2005, more than 300 licensees products were known
    • In 2009, more than 560!!!!
      • Many paid services include Medline content (Scopus, Web of Science, Ovid, etc.)
    • Kaenel, Isabelle de & Iriarte, Pablo. Alternative interfaces for PubMed searches. Poster at EAHIL Workshop, 2007. NLM Annual report http://www.nlm.nih.gov/ocpl/anreports/fy2009.pdf
    Data communicated by P. Iriarte
      • +
      • at least 30 alternative interfaces of PubMed to search Medline free of charge
    • Kaenel, Isabelle de & Iriarte, Pablo. Alternative interfaces for PubMed searches. Poster at EAHIL Workshop, 2007.
    • Zhiyong Li. PubMed and beyond: a survey of web tools for searching biomedical literature. Database (2011)
  • To name a few
    • RefScout: mailing service to keep-up with literature
      • http://www.refscout.com
    • AskMedline: free-text, natural language (plain English) query
      • http://askmedline.nlm.nih.gov/ask/ask.php
    • BabelMeSH : translate the MeSH terms in 8 languages
      • http://babelmesh.nlm.nih.gov/
    • ALIBABA: search and visualize protein
      • http://alibaba.informatik.hu-berlin.de/
    • PUBMED GOLD: to retrieve PDF
      • http://www.neurotransmitter.net/ftsearch.html
    • BioMedLib: multi-fucntions service (monitoring, citations, get PDF…)
      • http://bmlsearch.com/
    • Medline Trend : to make statistics on publications
      • http://dan.corlan.net/medline-trend.html
    • JOVE : video journal for physical, chemical, medical and life sciences research which is indexed in Medline
      • http://www.jove.com/
  • Outline
    • Medline/PubMed?
    • PubMed: a success or a tragedy?
    • Medline on the market
    • Best Alternatives:
        • GoPubMed, the analyzer
        • Quertle, the language master
        • PubFocus, the journal ranker
        • Pubget, the rush player
        • Biblimed, the smarter
    • Conclusion
      • My Recommendations
    • Sources
  • My Favorite alternatives
    • GoPubMed, the analyzer
    • Quertle, the language master
    • PubFocus, the journal ranker
    • Pubget, the rush player
    • Biblimed, the smarter
    • Entity recognition : using the Gene Ontology, GoPubMed identifies relevant biological concepts and shows possible hidden correlations between genes, drugs, and diseases
    • Automatic clustering: The perfect tool to identify opinion leaders on a topic, best journals in your field, etc.
    • :Nice interface, filters, etc.
  •  
    • Find meaningful results in context, not just long lists of documents
    • Quertle is a free search engine for the biomedical literature , providing linguistic approaches to get much more relevant results, returning documents where the author has stated a relationship between the search terms, not just simply throwing back long lists of documents where the terms have been found scattered throughout.
  •  
    • A clever mix of
      • statistical analysis of PubMed search queries
      • with journal rank original calculation
    • Excellent for bibliometrics
  •  
    • Amazing tool to retrieve free and legal PDF files
    • Search experience is based on documents availability and not only on relevance and completness
  •  
  • The smarter:
    • Be efficient, Be easy, Biblimed !
    • Use the power of the MeSH (without knowing a Word of it!)
    1. Type a single word 2. And narrow your search with MeSH qualifiers
  • Context tags Linking to free full-text where available Filters
  • Outline
    • Medline/PubMed?
    • PubMed: a success or a tragedy?
    • Medline on the market
    • Best Alternatives:
        • GoPubMed, the analyzer
        • Quertle, the language master
        • PubFocus, the journal ranker
        • Pubget, the rush player
        • Biblimed, the smarter
    • Conclusion
      • My Recommendations
    • Sources
  • CONCLUSION
    • PubMed has nowadays serious free competitors
    • These services compensate PubMed flaws
    • There are no objective reasons to continue to use PubMed
  • My recommendations Efficient search Access to documents Experts identification & Bibliometrics
  • Outline
    • Medline/PubMed?
    • PubMed: a success or a tragedy?
    • Medline on the market
    • Best Alternatives:
        • GoPubMed, the analyzer
        • Quertle, the language master
        • PubFocus, the journal ranker
        • Pubget, the rush player
        • Biblimed, the smarter
    • Conclusion
      • My Recommendations
    • Sources
  • Sources
    • General :
      • Gores, Gregory J. Open access journals: why are we not there yet? (!). Hepathology, Vol. 52, N°6, 2010. pp. 1869-1871. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hep.24004
      • Giustini, Dean. Web 3.0 and medicine: make way for the semantic web. British medical Journal, Vol. 335, 22-29 december 2007, pp. 1273-1274. http://www.bmj.com/content/335/7633/1273
    • PubMed & Medline :
      • Miner, Edward G. Where’d it go? The new Pubmed. October 29, 2009. Presentation on SlideShare: http://www.slideshare.net/BerrymanD/new-pubmed
      • Greg Rowell & Dean Giustini. An introduction to Medline for student health librarians. January 14th, 2010. Presentation available on Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/giustinid/an-introduction-to-medline-for-student-health-librarians
      • Featherstone, Robin. PubMed & Beyond. March 23, 2011. Presentation available on Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/featherr/pubmed-beyond
      • MLA 2010: NLM Online Users' Meeting: PowerPoint® Presentations. NLM Tech Bull. 2010 May-Jun;(374):e16d http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/mj10/mj10_mla_ss_ppt.html
  • Sources
    • Alternative sources :
      • Kaenel, Isabelle de & Iriarte, Pablo. Alternative interfaces for PubMed searches. Poster at EAHIL Workshop, 2007. http://www.bium.ch/wiki/lib/exe/fetch.php?cache=cache&media=PubMed_poster_EAHIL2007_linksA4.pdf
      • Zhiyong Li. PubMed and beyond: a survey of web tools for searching biomedical literature. Database (2011) 2011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/database/baq036
      • http://davidrothman.net/2007/11/29/poster-pubmed-alternative-interfaces/
    • Comparison of PubMed with Paid databases (Scopus, WoS, OVID, etc.):
      • Baykoucheva, Svetla (2010) ‘Selecting a Database for Drug Literature Retrieval: A Comparison of MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science’, Science & Technology Libraries, 29: 4, 276-288. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0194262X.2010.522946
      • http://www.utoledo.edu/library/mulford/pdf/medlinecomp_jan09.pdf
      • http://www.library.drexel.edu/tutorials/medlinecomparison.html
  • A study by: [email_address] @hervebasset