Telling Stories Through Design

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Web Directions @Media, London
11:45, 11 June 2010

Hannah Donovan talks about the designer as a storyteller—especially in terms of the importance of this role within a team. Improve your output as a designer by taking a closer look at influencing the input. As a visual narrator we help to visualise, inspire and curate for the people we work with as well as connecting scenarios around the larger product saga that supports the interfaces we design. By examining your input, make your output more effective with your team and users alike, paving paths for people to tell their own stories as your product evolves over time.

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Telling Stories Through Design

  1. TELLING STORIES THROUGH DESIGN 11 June 2010 — Hannah Donovan
  2. Prologue MY FRUSTRATION...
  3. Prologue IT’S NOT YOUR DESIGN OUTPUT THAT WILL MAKE OR BREAK THE PRODUCT, IT’S ALL THAT OTHER STUFF...
  4. Prologue ALL THE INPUTS.
  5. Prologue IT DOESN’T MATTER HOW TALENTED THE PEOPLE ARE, IF THE PROCESS SUCKS, THE PRODUCT IS SUCKS.
  6. Prologue
  7. Prologue SO WHAT DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH STORYTELLING?
  8. YOU ARE THE STORYTELLER Part 1
  9. Part 1 YOUR SUPERPOWER: YOU CAN DRAW
  10. ith Art credit: Ron Sm Credit: Lucas Arts Examples of sequential visuals: Comics & film storyboards
  11. My (crappy) sketches for Last.fm’s Best of 2009 feature
  12. 1. The finished product
  13. 1. Some of our tools
  14. 1.
  15. l round out the links and gener For Phase 2, we wil links to build, tu torials, developer include content like: deep IN B ET A Letting users know OBBLERS EATURED SCR DOES IT NEW & F SCROBBLE?t s Spotify HypeMachine MOG Featured content c just new cool scrob almo Learn More » The answer is Learn More » Learn More » regularly, it might m always, YES! template. O YOU USE? O RE — WHICH D racks what y ou listen to PLUS MANY M Scrobbling t More… More easily maint r. Learn more. Amarok in a media playe iTunes clients. Android de iPOd bbling tips? Tra Windows Media Player lala L ooking for scro CoverSutra orums. Winamp them in the f e exotic A hint that there ld for the mor favourite? Check out Bui OUP Don’t see your J OIN THE GR always being a dded) progress. obblers (more ATES! scr FOR MORE UPD page content House style “sketchy” visual
  16. PART 1 — RECAP • Drawing in front of, or with others motivates and inspires • Sets the stage for the story, puts everyone on a similar track. • Starts a dialogue, breaks down barriers, allows others to start adding & gives them peace of mind
  17. GOOD TEAMWORK IS STORYTELLING Part 2
  18. Part 2 STORYTELLING COMES FROM AN ORAL TRADITION
  19. Part 2 STORYTELLING IN AGILE
  20. Part 2 MAKING CONVERSATIONS HAPPEN
  21. Part 2 ARM YOURSELF WITH A DRAWING (OR THE ABILITY TO MAKE ONE) AND A STORY.
  22. Part 2 THINK LIKE A FILM CREW
  23. Part 2 LET INFLUENCES IN. YOU’RE THE EDITOR.
  24. Bits & bobs of the overarching story arc
  25. Tactical UI implementation for a single story…
  26. PART 2 - RECAP • Get good at starting conversations. Put yourself at the centre of the narrative • Take advantage of Agile to keep conversations flowing. Think like a film crew; edit against the plot. • Like a serial publication, start with a story arc, then write as many stories as you need
  27. STORYTELLING WITHIN AN ORGANISATION Part 3
  28. Part 3 STORIES ARE ALREADY NATURAL FOR AN ORGANISATION.
  29. Part 3 ORGANISATIONAL LORE
  30. Examples of lore collecting 2007 - 2010
  31. Weaving user’s stories into the organisational lore…
  32. Part 3 A NARRATIVE APPROACH TO PRESENTATION
  33. Part 3 STORIES: UP, DOWN & AROUND…
  34. A project that sparked educational storytelling
  35. PART 3 — SUMMARY • Gather company lore & spread it • Use a narrative approach to storytelling • Give everyone (especially people up the chain) a story to tell.
  36. YOUR TOOLKIT Part 4
  37. Part 4 BE MULTI-DISCIPLINARY
  38. Part 4 “PUT A LOT OF GUNS IN A LOT OF DRAWERS”.
  39. Part 4 WRITE BIG PARTS FOR YOUR USERS.
  40. Guerilla user testing
  41. Part 4 WRITE IT DOWN AND PASS IT ON.
  42. Part 4 DOING A 180
  43. Your NEW story here COMP ON EN T: TA KE S EF FE CT: SPRINT 35 VE RS IO N NUMB ER : 1 DATE : 13 / 04 / 10 PL AC E: LONDON HQ DDM Template
  44. PART 4 — RECAP • Don’t just design, learn a bit of everything • Explore a lot of routes • Write big parts for your users • Write down your stories so people can refer to them later.
  45. STORIES FOR THE END USER Part 5
  46. Part 5 “STORY IS ABOUT RESPECT FOR THE AUDIENCE”
  47. Part 5 “STORIES ARE ABOUT ARCHETYPES, NOT STEREOTYPES”
  48. Part 5 APPLY A CLASSIC NARRATIVE STRUCTURE TO SCENARIOS
  49. Part 5
  50. Part 5 HURDLING THE CONCEPTUAL MODEL
  51. Part 5 THE “HOW” NEEDS TO BE A STORY
  52. Part 5 SHOW NOT TELL.
  53. PART 5 — RECAP • Treat the audience with respect • Don’t resort to clichés, create realistic scenarios • Create ‘BME’ narratives around these scenarios • Back *new* conceptual models with a story; attempt to show it, not tell it!
  54. Epilogue “STORIES ARE WHAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF”* * Warning: late-night whisky quotation
  55. Thanks for Listening! CONTACT: Email: hannah@last.fm / Twitter: @han FLICKR POOL: http://www.flickr.com/groups/1456738@N23/pool SOURCES & FURTHER READING: http://delicious.com/hannahdonovan/storytelling

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