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Tuskegee Airmen
 

Tuskegee Airmen

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    Tuskegee Airmen Tuskegee Airmen Presentation Transcript

    • The Tuskegee Airmen by: Lauren Malliband “WE WERE FIGHTING FOR THE MILLIONS OF BLACK AMERICANS BACK HOME. WE WERE THERE TO BREAK DOWN BARRIERS, OPEN A FEW DOORS, AND DO A JOB.” – JOSEPH GOMER
    • Tuskegee Flying School  Policy of segregation in military  Stereotype of unintelligence and anti patriotism  Complaints about training available  Government created the 66th Air Force Flying School at Tuskegee Institute Set up strict restrictions assuming no one would qualify   First aviation class July 1941  Class of 13, 5 completed training
    • Tuskegee Flying School  Only those who met the  1941-1946 994 pilots strict standards accepted graduated  No standards lowered  Some of the first standardized tests used  Trained for single-engine (i.e. IQ, dexterity, pilots, twin-engine pilots, leadership) navigators, or bombardiers  Enlisted trained for mechanics, armament specialists, radio repair, etc. needed for ground support
    • The 99th Squadron  First group of men trained at the Tuskegee Institute  Frustrated by inequality; voiced by African American journalists  Restricted to escort duties  “success or failure would directly impact the future of Blacks”  450 of the pilots trained at Tuskegee served in the 99th sent to Casablanca, Morocco First   Received Citation for good performance in combat in Sicily  Then scolded as a failure and the pilots “cowardly”
    • Integration  The 99th was paired with the 79th Fighter Group, an all white squadron  Integrated for the first time  No longer escorts but bombing key German strongholds
    • The 332nd Photo of a briefing origins  July 4th, 1944 99th with the 100th, 301st, and 302nd  All were trained at the Tuskegee Institute  This was the 332nd Fighter Group  Continued to show their ability and passion
    • By the end of the war they were awarded multiple silver stars, 150 Distinguished Flying Crosses, 8 Purple Hearts, 14 Bronze stars, and 744 Air Medals This is a photo of a plane that the Tuskegee airmen flew (p-51 mustang)
    • After the War  Due to the abilities of the 332nd Fighter Group the government came under some scrutiny for segregation policy  African American airmen were still discriminated against in U.S. Also by other Air Force units (except those who worked with  them)  1948 President Truman ordered equality in all of the Armed Forces, led to integration in America
    •  The Tuskegee Airmen were now in high demand After the War Taught civilian flying schools  After segregation
    • Tuskegee after the war  Continued to accept  Advancement difficult students until 1946 Caused frustration   Women entered  Continued to work hard  A lot of black men joined  1949 332nd Fighter Group got first place in  Still segregated to 332nd the Air Force National Fighter Wing and 477th Fighter Gunnery Meet Composite Group
    • References  Brown, Avonie. “AFRO-Americ@: The Tuskegee Airmen”. 02 May 2009 http://www.afroam.org/history/tuskmain.html.  Gomer, Phyllis. Honor thy Father: A Tuskegee Airmen. 02 May 2009 http://www.josephgomer.com.  “Tuskegee Airmen”. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 20 Apr. 2009 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuskegee_Airmen.  “Who were the Tuskegee Airmen?” Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. 20 Apr. 2009 http://www.tuskegeeairmen.org/Tuskegee_Airmen History.html.