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DIY WebVideo Workshop for Media Tectonics

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www.modernmediajapan.com I gave this presentation on Monday 10.26.09 for a group of journalists, busiinesspeople, artists and other folks in Tokyo who are interested in using new media. it was part of …

www.modernmediajapan.com I gave this presentation on Monday 10.26.09 for a group of journalists, busiinesspeople, artists and other folks in Tokyo who are interested in using new media. it was part of an overall social media workshop designed by Lauren Shannon.
the audience, interestingly, was all adults, many middle-aged, and clearly keen to get up to speed on practical uses for these tools. It was great fun!


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  • Hi, I’m Terri MacMillan. Sorry about the mask, I’m not contagious, I promise.
    So, I’m going to talk with you about ways to produce, distribute and measure syndicated and standalone video programs via the great and glorious internet!
  • Lauren already gave us lots of reasons why it’s important to incorporate new media into your marketing mix. She talked about video and audio being important tools to do that, and that’s what I’m going to share with you tonight.
  • I’m going to tell you a short story that illustrates how even the smallest, locally-based business can get tell their story and build their community online, leading to a better bottom line.
    Insomnia
    reading twitter - a new media guy I respect
    best local video ever~
    ? picqued my interest, so I clicked the link
  • I’m going to tell you a short story that illustrates how even the smallest, locally-based business can get tell their story and build their community online, leading to a better bottom line.
    Insomnia
    reading twitter - a new media guy I respect
    best local video ever~
    ? picqued my interest, so I clicked the link
  • I’m going to tell you a short story that illustrates how even the smallest, locally-based business can get tell their story and build their community online, leading to a better bottom line.
    Insomnia
    reading twitter - a new media guy I respect
    best local video ever~
    ? picqued my interest, so I clicked the link
  • I’m going to tell you a short story that illustrates how even the smallest, locally-based business can get tell their story and build their community online, leading to a better bottom line.
    Insomnia
    reading twitter - a new media guy I respect
    best local video ever~
    ? picqued my interest, so I clicked the link
  • so, I clicked the link to check it out. it was startling. the production quality wasn’t great. it had over 1.8million page views.
    Even before I watched the video, I could see:
    it had a great title (click)
    Folks could tell their friends easily (click)
    the thumbnail looked..compelling to people who were interested in race, kitschy stuff, multiculturalism...even furniture! Let’s watch...
  • so, I clicked the link to check it out. it was startling. the production quality wasn’t great. it had over 1.8million page views.
    Even before I watched the video, I could see:
    it had a great title (click)
    Folks could tell their friends easily (click)
    the thumbnail looked..compelling to people who were interested in race, kitschy stuff, multiculturalism...even furniture! Let’s watch...
  • so, I clicked the link to check it out. it was startling. the production quality wasn’t great. it had over 1.8million page views.
    Even before I watched the video, I could see:
    it had a great title (click)
    Folks could tell their friends easily (click)
    the thumbnail looked..compelling to people who were interested in race, kitschy stuff, multiculturalism...even furniture! Let’s watch...
  • AOL small business covered the results. we don’t have specifics, other than the youtube stats - I don’t know how many more couches they sold. But the store manager says that the ads have brought more than page views. for example: (click) people have written in from as far away as Australia. so, clearly. this is a small business, telling an authentic story and building a community online.
  • now, video and audio engage through emotions. to get that engagement to happen, the backbone of your video or audio program is the story itself, not the computer. so, I usually put away the computer. bring out the pad and pencil...and erasers, and start to work on the story. here’s a few tips for creating your story.
  • the main steps I go through are these: Plan the story, create the storyboard, plan and execute the production, execute the edit (postproduction) and publish & measure. We’re going to focus today on #1 and #2, and I will give you some good resources to use for Step 3 & 4. We’re also going to talk a bit about Step 5. And then, I’ll be happy to take your questions.
  • write down the history of your product or service. create a simple timeline, from that history. review testimonials and opinions from others.
  • let’s think about the format of the story, the frame you’ll fit the story into. do you want to use tapestestimonials? case studies? Humor? historical re-enactment? fiction?
    what’s the most authentic form of the story? informal? documentary? all things to think about as you build the story.
  • here’s a handy chart of emotions for when you get stuck: obviously, it’s very broad, but sometimes if you aren’t quite sure of the emotion you want to convey in the story, the colors and the very explicit description of emotion can help trigger ideas.
  • Now it’s time to build the narrative of the main points of the story using index cards. I find that it’s really important to be hands on - use a big white board, or a bulletin board, or a table or the floor. Look at the story you’ve told so far, and fill out major points on the index cards: the problem, the protaganist, the villain, the story arc (what actually happens). Then summarize what the story is about.
  • So, you have your story, your format and your narrative. now you want to plan your storyboard for video or audio. although it’s the same process whether I’m creating a story for audio or video, creating emotional landscapes with audio is a bit more complex, so we’ll stick to video for now.
  • now it’s time to create your storyboard: but before we actual create the board, what we need to do is look at our resources, to see how we’ll actually tell the story. what do I mean by that?
  • To use resources that you already have, you need to create your media list. you probably already have lots of material that you can weave into a video, without having to shoot lots of new footage. Look into your archives. Check your website. Go through your timeline. Make a list of all of the media you already have that helps to illustrate your story. Make sure you have your list beside you as you build your storyboard.
    If you’re using a client’s project, be sure to get permission: heck, they may even want to spread the word once the video is done.
  • here’s where you bring it all together using everything you know so far. grab those index cards again, grab your media list, and visualize and write down:
    the opening
    the story arc
    the closing
    for example, let’s say you’re an artisan, and you work with a teacher, a sensei. you want to promote the studio with an online video. you know you have 3 pictures of the workshop at dawn. and you also have tapes of hammering sounds on your mobile phone when you did a bit of video a while back. And, you know that your sensei’s voice is very sensual. So, you want to include his voice at the start (and you have his permission). that’s what you’ll need to shoot. Then you’ll weave his voice, the 3 workshop pictures, and the hammering sounds into an introduction that tells the viewer what the video will be about.
    You decide on a compelling title. You may even decide to use specific color to help support that emotion. And, you’re ready to go.
  • The main things to remember, no matter what you are shooting are:
    get wide shots that establish the location. shoot 2 angles if you can.
    get medium shots that show people interacting. shoot 3 medium shot angles if you can get your subjects to repeat their interaction.
    get close ups, lots of close ups. for each shot, shoot 4-5 different angles, if you can.
    Video for the web is small scale, even though we use HD these days on youtube.

    Write down the shots you want on your index cards...and now, we get to the part we need to do quickly.
  • for these 2 parts of the process, as I said, they can be done in separate classes all their own. So, I I highly recommend 2 sets of classes that you can find online:
    1. Lynda.com granted, it costs $25.00 per month, but with this one resource, you can find amazingly detailed videos that will show you a lot about the process of editing, even with free software like iMovie and Windows Moviemaker. folks from beginners to pros use it. I don’t get a cut, I just think it’s a great resource.

    2. Videomaker Magazine.com
  • Okay, now we’re almost at the end of the presentation, and yet this is one of the resources I’m happiest to share: it’s called tubemogul.com, and it’s a way for you to simultaneously publish and get metrics for your video. And I mean publish on a long list of platforms: just be sure you have accounts for the platforms you want to use, have the usernames and passwords ready, put them into TubeMogul, upload your video, a great title, description with your url first, and a good set of keywords, and you’ll be ready to go. there’s a free and a paid solution and a tubemogul university with videos to help you understand what’s being measured.
  • and remember, youtube itself gives you increasingly sophisticated metrics on who is viewing your video, how much video they view, and so on. you can just google youtube insights, and you’ll get this overview to help you learn more.
  • Okay, I thank you for being here and I’d like to take your questions if time allows...
  • Transcript

    • 1. produce distribute measure Terri MacMillan Modern Media Japan www.modernmediajapan.com
    • 2. produce distribute measure DIYsyndicated & standalone audio and video programs via the great and glorious Internet Terri MacMillan Modern Media Japan www.modernmediajapan.com
    • 3. lots of reasons
    • 4. but first...
    • 5. had a little insomnia
    • 6. had a little insomnia started reading twitter
    • 7. had a little insomnia started reading twitter saw ‘best local video ever!’
    • 8. had a little insomnia started reading twitter saw ‘best local video ever!’ ?
    • 9. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnOyMSEWNTs
    • 10. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnOyMSEWNTs
    • 11. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnOyMSEWNTs
    • 12. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnOyMSEWNTs
    • 13. “...A couple from Georgia who bought furniture at the store Saturday told workers they were there because of the ad...”
    • 14. video and audio engage through emotions
    • 15. Step 1: Plan the story Step 2: Create the storyboard Step 3: The production Step 4: The edit Step 5: Publish & measure
    • 16. Step 1: Plan your story What are the top 3 reasons that you enjoy the work you want to talk about? Write down the history Create a simple timeline Review testimonials and opinions from others Feel free to add to the story as you learn more - don’t worry about editing at this point.
    • 17. Understanding the story format What story format fits your message and the viewer best? For example: Testimonials Case studies Humor Re-enactment Fiction Other Will the story be told in an informal style? As news, or a documentary? Will you need actors for a work of fiction? Do they have to be human - can you use cartoons, or dolls, or stick figures?
    • 18. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Plutchik
    • 19. Create the narrative: time for the index cards (and or whiteboard and or table and or floor) The problem The protaganist 1 The villain The story arc The resolution Summarize: My Story Is About:
    • 20. Story Format Narrative
    • 21. Step 2: Create your storyboard
    • 22. everything is media Photos Videos Graphics Speeches Summaries Presentations Things (that you can shoot, scan, record)
    • 23. title Shot List (what you need to shoot) visual Sound: teacher explaining how to start the opening project sound + Media list (already available) Visual: 3 picture slideshow of the story arc workshop at dawn Sound: hammering sounds Background: color that matches the emotion: make a background from Keynote or Powerpoint, export for video closing
    • 24. Close-up Wide Medium Close-up - over shoulder Close-up Close-up Close-up *she’s a 45 year old knit doll made by my Aunt Gloria
    • 25. Step 3: The production Step 4: The edit Lynda.com VideomakerMagazine.com
    • 26. Step 5: Publish & measure http://tubemogul.com/
    • 27. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xo6HBKTyIzQ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xo6HBKTyIzQ
    • 28. Resources http://www.videomaker.com Stock photos, graphics, video footage, audio www.creativecommons.org/ www.istockphoto.com/index.php Music List of various sites with thousands of resources: some free for credit only, some for sale at good indie prices: http://www.podseek.net/ directory/podcasting/podsafe_resources.html Tools Teleprompter on your PC: Videocue Pro http://www.telestream.net/video-cue/overview.htm Edit Online Edit On your desktop http://animoto.com/ Mac ilife/iMovie.com http://www.pixorial.com/ Windows: Moviemaker.com Awesome Video Podcast Tutorial Show Film Riot: http://revision3.com/filmriot/rain?hp
    • 29. Terri MacMillan Modern Media Japan www.modernmediajapan.com
    • 30. Thank you! Terri MacMillan Modern Media Japan www.modernmediajapan.com