CONTENTS
COVER STORY
POLITICAL PARTIES OF
PAKISTAN:
WHAT WILL THEY DO FOR FATA?
... Page 2
FATA SECURITY MONITOR
... Page ...
2 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42
POLITICAL PARTIES OF PAKISTAN:
WWHHAATT WWIILLLL TTHH
FFOORR FFAATTAA??
s...
3 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42
pointed out that the People’s Party is people
focused towards the betterm...
4 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42
“PTI will take revolutionary steps in restoring the tribal
people’s confi...
5 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42
their basic rights and have been suffering under the
notorious law of FCR...
6 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42
He pointed out that even though the people of FATA
have been awarded equa...
7 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42
WILL THE POLITICAL PARTIES BE ABLE TO LI
Even though the manifestos and r...
8 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42
FFAATTAA SSEECCUURRIITTYY
MMOONNIITTOORR
The year 2013 began with a fresh...
9 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 4
FFAATTAA PPOOLLIICCYY UUPP
WWhhaatt iiss tthhee LLeevviieess FFoorrccee??
...
10 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42
CCAANN PPAAKKIISSTTAANN DDRRIIVVEE TTHHEE TTAALLIIBBAANN
OOUUTT OOFF IIT...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Voices from FATA (newsletter, CAMP, April 2013)

310

Published on

Dear Readers,

In welcoming 2013, we present the ‘Elections Special Edition’ of Voices from FATA for January to April, bringing you news, views and analysis from the tribal regions of Pakistan. The Communities for Change (CFC) project has officially ended in March 2013, but CAMP continues its commitment to highlight issues affecting the lives of people of FATA, and expresses hope that the FATA Tribal Network will also maintain its efforts in development work k for the tribal region. Thus, we will carry on an e-nnewsletter ‘Voices from FATA’ into 2013 and beyond to enlighten readers about the tribal and its issues.

As 20013 is election year, we bring you highlights from th he manifestos of the main political partiies with a strong presence in FATA and views from their representatives in relation to their future strategy and plan of action for this area. These general elections have proven historic because it is the first time that political parties are campaigning in the tribal region, owing to the extension of the Political Parties Order 2002 to FATA.

Download the complete newsletter: http://www.camp.org.pk/node/527

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
310
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Voices from FATA (newsletter, CAMP, April 2013)

  1. 1. CONTENTS COVER STORY POLITICAL PARTIES OF PAKISTAN: WHAT WILL THEY DO FOR FATA? ... Page 2 FATA SECURITY MONITOR ... Page 8 FATA POLICY UPDATE ... Page 9 CAN PAKISTAN DRIVE THE TALIBAN OUT OF ITS TRIBAL BELT? ... Page 10 Dear Readers, In welcoming 2013, we present the ‘Elections Special Edition’ of Voices from FATA for January to April, bringing you news, views and analyses from the tribal regions of Pakistan. The Communities for Change (CFC) project has officially ended in March 2013, continues its commitment to highlight issues affecting the lives of people of FATA, and express hope that the FATA Tribal Network will also maintain its efforts in development work for the tribal region. Thus, we will carry on an e 2013 and beyond to enlighten readers about the tribal areas and its issues. As 2013 is election year, we bring you highlights from the manifestos of the main political parties with a strong presence in FATA and views from their repres their future strategy and plan of action for this area. These general elections have proven historic because it is the first time that political parties are campaigning in the tribal regions owing to the extension of the Political to the following pages. In relation to security conditions, the beginning of 2013 did not look as promising as a significant wave of violence swept a security forces operations and retaliatory attacks by militants, resulting in casualties to both sides as well as to the general public. Even though the following months offered some respite to citizens o till April 2013. For a more detailed analysis and statistics, please go to In the FATA policy update section, we bring you highlight ranging from the ability of the Pakistani state to rid the tribal areas of the Taliban’s influence. We have also included the sad account of a sch Jamrud Nevertheless, as we welcome 2013, we at CAMP pray for security conditions in FATA will improve to provide relief to the tribal people. In 2013, CAMP reiterates its commitment to democratic values, inclusivity for FATA, women and minorities into mainstream politics, awareness on the right to vote, and preventing manipulation and corruption for progress towards sustainable peace and a strong democracy for our country. Wishing for peace, prosperity and tolerance in Pakistan! M O N T H L Y N E W S L E T T E R Editorial Team Irum Ali Khan Said Afzal Shinwari Layout & Design by: This e-newsletter will be published by CAMP periodically. Its contents may be reproduced or cited provided the source is acknowledged. The views expressed in this publication are not necessarily of CAMP. To subscribe or send your feedback, write to us at: Email: camp@camp.org.pk Website: www.camp.org.pk EDITOR’S CORNER Dear Readers, In welcoming 2013, we present the ‘Elections Special Edition’ of Voices from FATA for January to April, bringing you news, views and analyses from the tribal regions of Pakistan. The Communities for Change (CFC) project has officially ended in March 2013, continues its commitment to highlight issues affecting the lives of people of FATA, and express hope that the FATA Tribal Network will also maintain its efforts in development work for the tribal region. Thus, we will carry on an e-newsletter ‘Vo 2013 and beyond to enlighten readers about the tribal areas and its issues. As 2013 is election year, we bring you highlights from the manifestos of the main political parties with a strong presence in FATA and views from their repres their future strategy and plan of action for this area. These general elections have proven historic because it is the first time that political parties are campaigning in the tribal regions owing to the extension of the Political Parties Act 2002 to FATA. To to the following pages. In relation to security conditions, the beginning of 2013 did not look as promising as a significant wave of violence swept across the tribal region in January owing to renewed security forces operations and retaliatory attacks by militants, resulting in casualties to both sides as well as to the general public. Even though the following months offered some respite to citizens of FATA, violence across the tribal belt remained more or less consistent till April 2013. For a more detailed analysis and statistics, please go to In the FATA policy update section, we bring you highlight ranging from an informative overview of the Levies force as well as an in depth analysis of the ability of the Pakistani state to rid the tribal areas of the Taliban’s influence. We have also included the sad account of a school teacher who was the Jamrud (page 9). Nevertheless, as we welcome 2013, we at CAMP pray for security conditions in FATA will improve to provide relief to the tribal people. 2013, CAMP reiterates its commitment to democratic values, inclusivity for FATA, women and minorities into mainstream politics, awareness on the right to vote, and preventing manipulation and corruption for progress towards sustainable peace and a strong emocracy for our country. Wishing for peace, prosperity and tolerance in Pakistan! Editor and Advocacy Coordinator January – April 2013 M O N T H L Y N E W S L E T T E R Editorial Team Irum Ali Khan Said Afzal Shinwari Layout & Design by: M. M. Tahir Saeed EDITOR’S CORNER In welcoming 2013, we present the ‘Elections Special Edition’ of Voices from FATA for January to April, bringing you news, views and analyses from the tribal regions of Pakistan. The Communities for Change (CFC) project has officially ended in March 2013, but CAMP continues its commitment to highlight issues affecting the lives of people of FATA, and express hope that the FATA Tribal Network will also maintain its efforts in development newsletter ‘Voices from FATA’ into 2013 and beyond to enlighten readers about the tribal areas and its issues. As 2013 is election year, we bring you highlights from the manifestos of the main political parties with a strong presence in FATA and views from their representatives in relation to their future strategy and plan of action for this area. These general elections have proven historic because it is the first time that political parties are campaigning in the tribal regions Parties Act 2002 to FATA. To read the full story, refer In relation to security conditions, the beginning of 2013 did not look as promising as a cross the tribal region in January owing to renewed security forces operations and retaliatory attacks by militants, resulting in casualties to both sides as well as to the general public. Even though the following months offered some f FATA, violence across the tribal belt remained more or less consistent till April 2013. For a more detailed analysis and statistics, please go to page 8. In the FATA policy update section, we bring you highlights from January till April 2013 an informative overview of the Levies force as well as an in depth analysis of the ability of the Pakistani state to rid the tribal areas of the Taliban’s influence. We have ool teacher who was the victim of target killing in Nevertheless, as we welcome 2013, we at CAMP pray for security conditions in FATA will 2013, CAMP reiterates its commitment to democratic values, inclusivity for FATA, women and minorities into mainstream politics, awareness on the right to vote, and preventing manipulation and corruption for progress towards sustainable peace and a strong Barrister Irum Ali Khan Editor and Advocacy Coordinator CAMP Office Islamabad | Issue No. 42 P.O. Box 765, Islamabad, Pakistan E-mail: camp@camp.org.pk Website: www.camp.org.pk
  2. 2. 2 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 POLITICAL PARTIES OF PAKISTAN: WWHHAATT WWIILLLL TTHH FFOORR FFAATTAA?? s part of the ‘Elections Special Edition’ cover story, we take a look at the promises of peace and prosperity that the political p Pakistan are putting forward for its people, and especially the tribal region. Therefore, we examine the manifestos of those political parties whose presence is felt within FATA and what they have planned to do for this hitherto marginalised area of Pakistan. A positive development of note is that with the extension of the Political Parties Act 2002 to FATA in 2011, political parties have been able to campaign and present their manifestos to the tribal people for the first time in the history of Pakistan. PPAAKKIISSTTAANN PPEEOOPPLLEE’’SS PPAARRTTYY PPAARRLLIIAAMMEENNTTAARRIIAANNSS The Pakistan People’s Party Parliamentarians (PPPP) aims at “sustainable, accountable and robust democracy in Pakistan” and to “reserve and strengthen the Federation by building a new social contract for Pakistan and devolving power to the Provinces”. A “The Pakistan we shall endeavour to remake will be at peace with itself, and with the world.” COVER STORY Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 POLITICAL PARTIES OF PAKISTAN: HHEEYY DDOO ?? s part of the ‘Elections Special Edition’ cover story, we take a look at the promises of peace and prosperity that the political parties of Pakistan are putting forward for its people, and especially the tribal region. Therefore, we examine the manifestos of those political parties whose presence is felt within FATA and what they have planned to do for of Pakistan. A positive development of note is that with the extension of the Political Parties Act 2002 to FATA in 2011, political parties have been able to campaign and present their manifestos to the tribal people for the first time in the Pakistan” and to “reserve and strengthen the Federation for Pakistan and The PPPP’s manifesto clearly states that process of inclusion and mainstreaming for FATA will continue in light of the government’s commitment to elevate its status to a province. In particular, the PPPP manifesto also focuses on inclusivity for marginalised groups such as women and minorities as well as settling IDPs displaced by anti terror initiatives. The main focus of the PPPP with respect to the tribal regions is therefore to continue its achievement of initiating the “long awaited governance reforms in FATA and begun process of mainstreaming, which should go forward in the future as a new provincial entity” and “increase in 2 seats reserved for women candidates from FATA”. MMrr.. MMaalliikk WWaarriiss KKhhaann AAffrriidd PPPPPPPP Mr. Malik Waris Khan Afridi is a renowned political activist and tribal elder hailing from Tehsil Bara of Khyber Agency, currently serving as Chief Organiser FATA for the PPPP. He Core Priorities: Ensuring basic needs Empowerment of all citizens Equitable and inclusive growth Infrastructure New social contract for Federation Protecting the people of Pakistan The Pakistan we shall endeavour to remake will be at peace with itself, and with the The PPPP’s manifesto clearly states that the process of inclusion and mainstreaming for FATA will continue in light of the government’s commitment to elevate its status to a province. In particular, the PPPP manifesto also focuses on inclusivity for marginalised groups such as women minorities as well as settling IDPs displaced by The main focus of the PPPP with respect to the tribal regions is therefore to continue its achievement of initiating the “long awaited governance reforms in FATA and begun process of mainstreaming, which should go d in the future as a new provincial entity” and “increase in 2 seats reserved for women candidates from ddii:: CChhiieeff OOrrggaanniisseerr FFAATTAA,, Mr. Malik Waris Khan Afridi is a renowned political activist rom Tehsil Bara of Khyber Agency, currently serving as Chief Organiser FATA for the PPPP. He Ensuring basic needs Empowerment of all citizens Equitable and inclusive Infrastructure New social contract for Protecting the people of
  3. 3. 3 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 pointed out that the People’s Party is people focused towards the betterment of marginalised and poor communities. “The tribal people form one of the most under developed and neglected segment of Pakistani society, who have been intentionally kept underdeveloped by all previous regimes for their own vested interests and foreign policy objectives.” Regarding the constitutional status of FATA he iterated that his party is supporting the tribesmen’s will and in this regard he recommended the establishment of a representative council with members elected from all tribal agencies, in a similar pattern to the Gilgit Ba Executive Council. This council would serve the purpose of deciding the future status of FATA because its members will be the real representatives of the tribal people. Regarding future plans of the PPPP he said that on the basis of its present performance his party will contest election from all constituencies of FATA and hope to secure a stable position within FATA in the upcoming elections. He said that improvement of peace and security situation in the region would be the first priority and then education, health and infrastructure would be addressed urgently in order to bring the area into mainstream development. PPAAKKIISSTTAANN TTEEHHRREEEEKK--EE--IINNSSAAAAFF The Pakistan Tehreek- e-Insaaf (PTI) states its mission to be ‘establishing the rule of law and ensuring protection of human rights through an independent and honest judiciary, strive for the social development and economic prosperity of our citizens, especially the poor and underprivileged masses’ PTI aims at reforming the system of governance in FATA stating: “The outdated FATA administrative system will be done away with through appropriate amendments in the FCR based on the wishes of the people of FATA. Powers in FATA shall be devolved to Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 pointed out that the People’s Party is people-centric and focused towards the betterment of marginalised and poor “The tribal people form one of the most under developed and neglected segment of Pakistani been intentionally kept underdeveloped by all previous regimes for their own vested interests and foreign policy objectives.” constitutional status of FATA he iterated that his party is supporting the tribesmen’s will and in this regard he recommended the establishment of a representative council with members elected from all tribal agencies, in a similar pattern to the Gilgit Baltistan Executive Council. This council would serve the purpose of deciding the future status of FATA because its members will be the real representatives of the tribal people. Regarding future plans of the PPPP he said that on the formance his party will contest election from all constituencies of FATA and hope to secure a stable position within FATA in the upcoming elections. He said that improvement of peace and security situation in the region would be the first priority and then education, health and infrastructure would be addressed urgently in order to bring the area into mainstream independent and honest judiciary, strive for the social development and economic prosperity of our citizens, especially the poor and underprivileged masses’. PTI aims at reforming the system of governance in FATA “The outdated FATA administrative system will be done away with through appropriate amendments in the FCR based on the wishes of the people of FATA. Powers in FATA shall be devolved to a lower level in conformity with the system in the settled areas”. MMrr.. MMaalliikk JJaavveedd KKhhaann AAff PPTTII Mr. Malik Javed Khan Afridi hails from Bar Qambar Khel, Tehsil Bara of Khyber Agency and has been associated with PTI since the beginning of his political career; serving as Chief Organiser FATA and the spokesperson for PTI in the tribal region Mr. Javed Afridi criticised past regimes, stating that the will of the tribal people has never been taken into account by any government till date. A misconception about the people of FATA has fed into generally negative opinions about them; one in p to the perceived inability of tribal people to understand politics as well as other aspects of development and administration. This can easily be proved wrong by illustrating the success of the Jirga system, which is the only conflict resolution mechanism, not only deeply rooted within tribal society but also widely respected and acknowledged for its fairness and delivery of justice to communities. “The PTI is determined to provide a credible new leadership that can restore Pakistan’s political and economic sovereignty through building a bond of trust between the government and the people.” level in conformity with the system in the settled ffrriiddii:: SSppookkeessppeerrssoonn FFAATTAA,, Mr. Malik Javed Khan Afridi hails from Bar Qambar Khel, Tehsil Bara of Khyber Agency and has been associated with PTI since the beginning of his political career; serving as Chief Organiser FATA and presently the spokesperson for PTI in the tribal region. Mr. Javed Afridi criticised past regimes, stating that the will of the tribal people has never been taken into account by any government till date. A misconception about the people of FATA has fed into generally negative opinions about them; one in particular related to the perceived inability of tribal people to understand politics as well as other aspects of development and administration. This can easily be proved wrong by illustrating the success of the Jirga system, which is the olution mechanism, not only deeply rooted within tribal society but also widely respected and acknowledged for its fairness and delivery of “The PTI is determined to provide a credible new leadership that can restore Pakistan’s political and economic sovereignty through building a bond of trust between the government and the people.”
  4. 4. 4 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 “PTI will take revolutionary steps in restoring the tribal people’s confidence in the state. A strong check and balance system will be implemented in FATA. Since PTI has a focus on the youth, therefore policies for the welfare of youth will be developed on opportunities for education and vocational training skills will be provided. In addition, economic opportunities for employment and entrepreneurship at the local level will be introduced for the skilled tribal youth of FATA.” AAWWAAMMII NNAATTIIOONNAALL PPAARRTTYY “..The party is dedicated to the promotion of democracy and freedom, the eradication of poverty and ignorance, the protection of all basic human rights and liberties, and the fulfilment of the genuine and legitimate aspirations of all groups and strata of the society – particularly the weak, the disadvantaged and the dispossessed.” Goals: Pakistan as independent and sovereign Strengthening state institutions Complete political, economic & religious freedom for people Accountable & efficient government Launch education revolution Availability of adequate health care services for all Poverty alleviation Equal opportunity for employment and upward social mobility for all Suitable environment for growth of private sector End VIP culture Eliminate draconian laws giving unchecked powers to police/ agencies Self reliant economy free of dependence of foreign aid Promote regional peace ANP Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 PTI will take revolutionary steps in restoring the tribal people’s confidence in the state. A strong check and balance system will be implemented in FATA. Since PTI has a focus on the youth, therefore policies for the welfare of youth will be developed on priority basis; opportunities for education and vocational training skills will be provided. In addition, economic opportunities for employment and entrepreneurship at the local level will be introduced for the skilled tribal particularly the weak, the The Awami National Party (ANP)’s “believes in peace and non violence and stands against extremism and violence all its forms”. The party’s guiding philosophy also promotes dialogue as the best way to resolve all conflicts and issues. With respect to FATA, ANP’s approach is to strengthen the writ of the state across the tribal region; establish a public insurance policy and support mechanism for victims of sectarianism and terrorism as well as their families; prioritise the rehabilitation of natural resources and infrastructure; develop a consensus for mainstreaming and inclusion; and, implement administrative ref enable its merger with the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. MMrr.. IImmrraann AAffrriiddii:: SSeeccuurriittyy ss && FFAATTAA Mr. Imran Afridi hails from Bara Subdivision of Khyber Agency and has been associated with ANP for the past 17 years, serving as President ANP, Khyber Agency Chapter and ANP Vice President KP. Currently, he is “Salar-e-Alaa” for FATA and KP (In charge security section ANP). “ANP’s philosophy is that of Pakhtun unity regardless of geographic boundaries, but in light of democratic and progressive values, the will of tribal people must be considered as to whether they prefer to merge with KP, retain its present status or evolve into an independent province. ANP will respect the decision of the people, whatever it may be.” He pointed out that the tribal areas have borne the brunt of vested interests of different regional and international actors over centuries. As a result, he stated that the tribal people have been deprived of istan as independent and Strengthening state institutions Complete political, economic & religious freedom for people Launch education revolution Availability of adequate health care Equal opportunity for employment and upward social mobility for all Suitable environment for growth of Eliminate draconian laws giving unchecked powers to police/ Self reliant economy free of ANP The Awami National Party (ANP)’s “believes in peace and non violence and stands against extremism and violence in all its forms”. The party’s guiding philosophy also promotes dialogue as the best way to resolve all conflicts and issues. With respect to FATA, ANP’s approach is to strengthen the writ of the state across the tribal region; establish a public policy and support mechanism for victims of sectarianism and terrorism as well as their families; prioritise the rehabilitation of natural resources and infrastructure; develop a consensus for mainstreaming and inclusion; and, implement administrative reforms to enable its merger with the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. sseeccttiioonn IInn cchhaarrggee AANNPP,, KKPP Mr. Imran Afridi hails from Bara Subdivision of Khyber Agency and has been associated with ANP for the past President ANP, Khyber Agency Chapter and ANP Vice President KP. Currently, he is Alaa” for FATA and KP (In charge security “ANP’s philosophy is that of Pakhtun unity regardless of geographic boundaries, but in light d progressive values, the will of tribal people must be considered as to whether they prefer to merge with KP, retain its present status or evolve into an independent province. ANP will respect the decision of the people, ut that the tribal areas have borne the brunt of vested interests of different regional and international actors over centuries. As a result, he stated that the tribal people have been deprived of
  5. 5. 5 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 their basic rights and have been suffering under the notorious law of FCR. They have been neglected in all spheres of development such as health, education, infrastructure and employment. The region was man’s land’ for political activities and freedom of thought and expression thus becoming a real threat for the entire country’s survival and security. He stated that if ANP returns to power after the upcoming general elections, it will favour the administrative merging of FATA into KP improving the law and order situation; and impose a development-centred emergency plan fully by the principles of public accountability and community ownership. JJAAMMAAAATT--EE--IISSLLAAMMII “Jamaat-e-Islami professes a concept of life which is all embracing and aims at the welfare of the human kind.” Areas of Focus: Peace and security Political, legal and administrative reforms Social, economic and fiscal reforms Provincial autonomy – education, health, population planning & well being, labour rights & development, youth development & employment, agriculture, environment, industry & technical advancement, arts & culture, sports & tourism, information & technology Human rights – women’s rights & empowerment, children’s rights, minorities rights and empowe old age citizens and people with disabilities FATA – political changes & developmental reforms External affairs – foreign policy adjusted to further national interest in terms of economic and commercial progress; promote regional peace & friendly relations with all countries, especially neighbouring states Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 their basic rights and have been suffering under the ous law of FCR. They have been neglected in all spheres of development such as health, education, infrastructure and employment. The region was a ‘no man’s land’ for political activities and freedom of thought and expression thus becoming a real threat for the entire country’s survival and security. He stated that if ANP returns to power after the upcoming general elections, it will favour the administrative merging of FATA into KP; focus on improving the law and order situation; and impose a centred emergency plan fully supported by the principles of public accountability and The Jamaat-e-Islami (JI) proposes to build Pakistan into a ‘model Islamic state’; “propagation of Islam, ridding the society of fallacies of traditions both old and new, approaching intelligentsia o solutions to our problems, and endeavour to reform the moral values of the society..”, are the main components of its philosophy. The JI aims at bringing about peace and progress, in the light of Islamic principles and values: “To achieve its objectives, the Jamaat intends to bring changes in the political system peacefully through constitutional and democratic means”. The JI recommends the uplifting of the tribal areas with due respect to its ‘special status’; developing educational reforms and healthcare infrastructure; introducing legal and economic reforms; constitutional amendments (in Article 247) to provide for Parliament’s legislative authority to extend to FATA; abolish FCR; and, set up a representative elected assembly with the authority to determine the future status of the tribal region and its institutions, as well as fundamental rights and freedoms for its people. ZZaarr NNoooorr AAffrriiddii:: NNaaiibb AAmm Mr. Zar Noor Afridi, hailing from Landikotal, Khyber agency has been associated with Jamaat for the past 33 years and is presently serving as Naib Ameer for FATA. Mr. Afridi stated that JI is a leading political party in the tribal region and enjoys the confidence of the public as a result of its principled stand on democracy and transparent leadership. Political, legal and administrative Social, economic and fiscal reforms education, health, population planning & well development, youth development & employment, agriculture, environment, industry & technical advancement, arts & culture, sports & tourism, information women’s rights & empowerment, children’s rights, minorities rights and empowerment, old age citizens and people with political changes & foreign policy adjusted to further national interest in terms of economic and commercial progress; promote regional peace & lations with all countries, especially neighbouring states Islami (JI) proposes to build Pakistan into a ‘model Islamic state’; “propagation of Islam, ridding the society of fallacies of traditions both old and new, approaching intelligentsia on how Islam provides solutions to our problems, and endeavour to reform the moral values of the society..”, are the main components of its philosophy. The JI aims at bringing about peace and progress, in the light of Islamic principles and values: ieve its objectives, the Jamaat-e-Islami intends to bring changes in the political system peacefully through constitutional and democratic The JI recommends the uplifting of the tribal areas with due respect to its ‘special status’; developing cational reforms and healthcare infrastructure; introducing legal and economic reforms; constitutional amendments (in Article 247) to provide for Parliament’s legislative authority to extend to FATA; abolish FCR; and, set up a representative elected ly with the authority to determine the future status of the tribal region and its institutions, as well as fundamental rights and freedoms for its people. mmeeeerr JJII,, FFAATTAA Mr. Zar Noor Afridi, hailing from Landikotal, Khyber agency has been associated with Jamaat-e-Islami (JI) for the past 33 years and is presently serving as Naib Afridi stated that JI is a leading political party in n and enjoys the confidence of the public as a result of its principled stand on democracy and transparent leadership.
  6. 6. 6 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 He pointed out that even though the people of FATA have been awarded equal rights and freedoms under the Constitution of the Islamic Rep 1973, in practice, they have not been allowed to exercise them. The tribal people have made many sacrifices but are suffering due to the so called war on terror which has torn millions of homes and families apart. With respect to the upcoming general elections he said that JI will appoint candidates from all constituencies of FATA. He put forward the demand of amending Articles 246 and 247 in favour of transferring the power to elected Parliament instead of the President of Pakistan. He said that in order to address developmental and Points of Agenda: Islamic State at Madina – to strive for Sovereign, independent and dignified Pakistan Law & order - curbing terrorism and lawlessness; justice for all Protection of vulnerable groups & inclusioin - protection of women’s rights, youth, minorities’ protection of senior, disabled and special citizens, and care of downtrodden and afflicted Economic policy reforms abolition of feudal system and introduction of agricultural reforms, curbing inflation, jobs for everyone, labour friendly policies and ‘privatisation’, Overcoming energy crisis Eradication of corruption and recovery of ill-gotten wealth Education Healthcare Social reforms Defence policy Media policy Information technology Local government Tribal areas – development infrastructure & authority for self determination Special Balochistan package Constitutional reforms Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 He pointed out that even though the people of FATA have been awarded equal rights and freedoms under the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan 1973, in practice, they have not been allowed to exercise them. The tribal people have made many sacrifices but are suffering due to the so called war on terror which has torn millions of homes and families With respect to the upcoming general elections he said that JI will appoint candidates from all constituencies of FATA. He put forward the demand of amending Articles 246 and 247 in favour of transferring the power to lected Parliament instead of the President of Pakistan. He said that in order to address developmental and other issues, FATA should be declared as separate province with special package for speedy implementation in all spheres. In particular, the areas of health, employment, infrastructure and other public facilities will be given the utmost priority. Mr. Zar Noor Afridi stressed the need for a modern education system with technical and vocational support to provide youth with improved opportunities for employment. He categorically stated strictly against all military operations and drone attacks, and will extend its support to all initiatives leading to peace and normalcy in FATA and Pakistan in general. JJAAMMIIAATT--EE--UULLEEMMAA--EE--II “The welfare system would be so strong that in some cases, the people for giving Zakat would be hard to find and the JUI-F would increase workers’ salary equal to the price of one tola gold (14 grams).” The Jamiat-e-Ulema-e-Islam [JUI(F)] aims to introduce comprehensive changes in the present system based on Islamic laws, where the Pakistani welfare state would not only ensure provision of basic needs to every citizen, but also protect their safety, security and freedom as enshrined in the of the Islamic Republic of Paki In its manifesto, the JUI- system of accountability and if voted to power, it proposes the introduction of merit in the affairs of civil service and strict compliance with the rule of law. It also supports complete freed certain restrictions; education to be compulsory up to secondary school and state support for higher education; and, complete freedom to minorities to establish and preserve their religious and education centres. “To achieve its objectives, the Jamaat-e-Islami intends to bring changes in the political system peacefully through constitutional and democratic means”. an ideal Sovereign, independent and curbing terrorism and lawlessness; justice for all Protection of vulnerable groups & protection of women’s rights, youth, minorities’ rights, protection of senior, disabled and special citizens, and care of downtrodden and afflicted Economic policy reforms – abolition of feudal system and introduction of agricultural reforms, curbing inflation, jobs for everyone, labour friendly policies Overcoming energy crisis Eradication of corruption and gotten wealth development & authority for self Special Balochistan package other issues, FATA should be declared as separate province with special package for speedy implementation in all spheres. In particular, the areas health, employment, infrastructure and other public facilities will be given the utmost priority. Mr. Zar Noor Afridi stressed the need for a modern education system with technical and vocational support to provide youth with improved opportunities for employment. He categorically stated that the JI is strictly against all military operations and drone attacks, and will extend its support to all initiatives leading to peace and normalcy in FATA and Pakistan in IISSLLAAMM ((FF)) workers’ salary equal to the price of one tola gold (14 Islam [JUI(F)] aims to introduce comprehensive changes in the present governance system based on Islamic laws, where the Pakistani welfare state would not only ensure provision of basic needs to every citizen, but also protect their safety, security and freedom as enshrined in the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan 1973. -F emphasises on a strong system of accountability and if voted to power, it proposes the introduction of merit in the affairs of civil service and strict compliance with the rule of law. It freedom of media, but with certain restrictions; education to be compulsory up to secondary school and state support for higher education; and, complete freedom to minorities to establish and preserve their religious and education To achieve its objectives, the Islami intends to bring changes in the political system peacefully through constitutional and democratic means”.
  7. 7. 7 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 WILL THE POLITICAL PARTIES BE ABLE TO LI Even though the manifestos and representatives of the political parties campaigning for the first time ever in FATA promise peace, security and development for the region, it remains to be seen whether they will be able to achiev future depends on both internal factors centre – and external factors including regional and domestic politics, security conditions and the political strength of FATA’s rep MMrr.. HHaajjii JJaalliill JJaann:: PPrroovviinncciiaall IInnffoorrmmaatt JJUUII ((FF)) Mr. Haji Jalil Jan is currently serving as the Provincial Information Secretary for JUI (F), which has a major presence and following across FATA. The party established a strong network of small agency level organisations over 40 years ago which is still functioning successfully. He said that JUI’s main focus is the restoration of peace in FATA. For that purpose the party formed a 35 member Jirga which visited all the agencies and Frontier Regions (FRs) of FATA, and after meeting the common people concluded that the foremost demand of tribal people is restoration of peace. On FATA’s constitutional status, he said that instead of imposing a decision, JUI has left this decision to be made by the people of FATA themselves. JUI would back any law which would serve the interests and welfare of FATA’s common people. “No policy or law can work in practice unless peace is restored in the region. Therefore, JUI’s first priority is to make efforts for restoring peace and then introducing a people backed throughout FATA.” Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 WILL THE POLITICAL PARTIES BE ABLE TO LIVE UP TO THEIR PROMISES? Even though the manifestos and representatives of the political parties campaigning for the first time ever in FATA promise peace, security and development for the region, it remains to be seen whether they will be able to achieve these targets after elections; it’s future depends on both internal factors – such as which party comes into power at the and external factors including regional and domestic politics, security conditions and the political strength of FATA’s representatives in the National Assembly JUI (F)’s 12 Point Agenda: Pakistan as ideal welfare state Security to lives and properties of all citizens Door step delivery of justice for every citizen – change old judicial system Economy – full utilisation resources instead of dependence of external aid Quality education secondary higher school Encourage remittances from overseas Pakistanis Preservation of Islamic family values Female representation in national/provincial provisions for direct election Legislation to be in line with recommendations from Council of Islamic Ideology for the country’s economic, political and social betterment in accordance with the principles of Islam New provinces to be establish after consensus by all stakeholders Peace and security in FATA through Jirga Foreign policy – with national interests determination ttiioonn SSeeccrreettaarryy Mr. Haji Jalil Jan is currently serving as the Provincial Information Secretary for JUI (F), which has a major presence and following across FATA. The party established a strong network of small agency level organisations over 40 years ago which is still He said that JUI’s main focus is the restoration of peace the party formed a 35 member Jirga which visited all the agencies and TA, and after meeting the common people concluded that the foremost demand of tribal people is restoration of peace. On FATA’s constitutional status, he said that instead of imposing a decision, JUI has left this decision to be themselves. JUI would back any law which would serve the interests and “No policy or law can work in practice unless peace is restored in the region. Therefore, JUI’s first priority is to make efforts for restoring peace and then introducing a people backed-system VE UP TO THEIR PROMISES? Even though the manifestos and representatives of the political parties campaigning for the first time ever in FATA promise peace, security and development for the region, it e these targets after elections; it’s such as which party comes into power at the and external factors including regional and domestic politics, security conditions resentatives in the National Assembly. JUI (F)’s 12 Point Agenda: Pakistan as ideal welfare state Security to lives and properties of all Door step delivery of justice for every change old judicial system full utilisation of natural resources instead of dependence of Quality education – compulsory up to secondary higher school Encourage remittances from overseas Preservation of Islamic family values Female representation in national/provincial assemblies – provisions for direct election Legislation to be in line with recommendations from Council of Islamic Ideology for the country’s economic, political and social betterment in accordance with the principles of Islam New provinces to be established only after consensus by all stakeholders Peace and security in FATA through to be brought in line with national interests
  8. 8. 8 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 FFAATTAA SSEECCUURRIITTYY MMOONNIITTOORR The year 2013 began with a fresh wave of violent incidents in FATA, with the highest number recorded in January (51) killing 297 persons and injuring 145 in total. Most casualties comprised of suspected/actual militants (221) who were killed either in drone strikes or in clashes/security forces operations. In January, attacks on schools continued as three schools were targeted by militants – among them a girls’ school – in Spin Qabar and Bara areas of Khyber agency. Source: http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/Waziristan/timeline/index.html In February, the number of violent incidents plummeted drastically resulting in lesser casualties and injuries to people. And, next month, the number of civilian casualties (men, women and children) further reduced to 23 as illustrated in the figure below, with the number of civilian deaths remaining more or less the same (26) in April. Meanwhile, losses to military personnel, after an initial decline – from 33 in January to 16 in February – increased to 70 in the month of April 2013. Category of persons JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL Killed Injured Killed Injured Killed Injured Killed Injured Military personnel 33 25 16 27 24 18 70 19 Suspected/actual militants 221 60 155 42 185 54 135 27 Professionals (polio workers, journalists etc) 2 2 2 Civilian men (including tribals) 31 49 45 48 22 58 26 44 Women 9 5 Children 2 6 1 2 2 TOTAL 297 145 218 117 234 132 231 92 TYPE OF INCIDENT JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL No Killed Injured No Killed Injured No Killed Injured No Killed Injured Bomb attacks 5 16 8 2 16 28 7 7 16 3 5 5 Landmine explosions 1 2 16 3 4 3 Mortar shelling 7 16 18 2 7 3 1 Suicide bombings 3 68 31 2 13 12 IEDs 7 12 29 5 10 25 4 11 18 Drone attacks 7 47 12 1 7 6 2 6 2 13 Military/SF operations 10 77 44 10 115 36 7 78 18 12 122 38 By unidentified/militant groups 9 34 15 3 15 3 4 16 4 8 70 25 Intertribal/factional clashes 5 93 3 4 43 19 6 48 44 Hand Grenades 1 1 Rocket/missile attacks 1 5 1 4 8 TOTAL 51 297 145 28 218 117 34 234 132 34 231 92 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 January February March April No of incidents Killed Injured VIOLENCE IN JAN - APR 2013 As illustrated in the graph, January was the most violent month, recording the highest number of incidents and casualties. A dramatic reduction can be witnessed in February – from 51 incidents to 28 and casualties coming down from 297 to 218 – but remaining more or less consistent over the next two months . On the whole, the numbers show that in the first four months of 2013, the average number of deaths in FATA due to violent incidents was about 250 every month.
  9. 9. 9 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 4 FFAATTAA PPOOLLIICCYY UUPP WWhhaatt iiss tthhee LLeevviieess FFoorrccee?? PESHAWAR: The Levies are part of a security apparatus installed between the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and settled areas known as the Frontier Region (FR). As opposed to the khasadars, referred to as “tribal police” and appointed by tribal authorities, the Levies are recruited administration on merit basis and are given arms and ammunition by the government. The 21 Levies personnel slain by militants on December 29 were recruited in 2010 by the political administration. Defence analyst Brigadier (retd) Mehmood Shah said that Levies Forces do not operate across Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (K FATA, and the name used for such forces there is Frontier Constabulary and Frontier Corps. The Frontier Constabulary is a federal parami drawn from KP, said Shah. Its main function is to protect the borders of the province, check cross-border infiltration and smuggling. The Frontier Corps is also responsible for protecting the western border regions of the country. The force is answerable to the Ministry of States and Frontier Regions and the General Headquarters. Shah informed that, in actuality, the Levies force work in Balochistan as government employees who abide by state regulation. Tribal identity is not taken into consideration at the time of hiring. The Levies force was established in 1859 in the Malakand area during British rule, and later expanded to Dir, Bajaur and Orakzai agencies. Political agents and district coordination officers act as commandants of Levies forces within their respective jurisdictions. http://tribune.com.pk/story/486847/what-is-the- | Issue No. 42 PPDDAATTEE The Levies are part of a security apparatus installed between the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and settled areas known as the Frontier Region (FR). As opposed to the khasadars, referred to as “tribal police” and appointed by recruited by the political administration on merit basis and are given arms and The 21 Levies personnel slain by militants on December 29 were recruited in 2010 by the political administration. Defence analyst Brigadier (retd) Mehmood Shah said that Levies Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and , and the name used for such forces there is Frontier The Frontier Constabulary is a federal paramilitary unit largely P, said Shah. Its main function is to protect the border infiltration and The Frontier Corps is also responsible for protecting the western orce is answerable to the Ministry of States and Frontier Regions and the General Shah informed that, in actuality, the Levies force work in Balochistan as government employees who abide by state consideration at the The Levies force was established in 1859 in the Malakand area during British rule, and later expanded to Dir, Bajaur and Orakzai agencies. Political agents and district coordination officers act as forces within their respective -levies-force/ SSCCHHOOOOLL TTEEAACCHHEERR TTAARRGG Targeted attack: Schoolteacher who served Khyber Agency for 22 years shot dead JAMRUD / PESHAWAR: Shehnaz Ishtiaq, who served students in Khyber Agency for 22 years, was gunned down in front of her teenage son in Jamrud on Tuesday morning. Daniyal, 14, was taking his mother to school when unidentified gunmen on a motorcycle intercepted them and opened fire, leaving her severely injured. “She was shot thrice in the upper body,” said political administration official Asmatullah Wazir. Following the incident, the school’s owner, Malik Khanwali, shifted her to Hayatabad Medical Complex but she died three hours after being taken for surgery. Shehnaz’s death comes after similar attacks on teachers and aid workers, including that on social worker Farida Afridi and Human Rights Commission of Pakistan Coordinator Zarteef Afridi. Her husband Isthiaq Khan said she did not see this coming and worked fearlessly in the troubled r about any threats or fears she had… she was not scared of militancy in the region. When security problems in Khyber Agency worsened I told her she should transfer to a school in the settled areas, but she said she only wanted to w never thought such a tragedy would happen.” Shehnaz was a headmistress at Community Girls School in Shahkas. Prior to that she was working for a government primary school for girls in Bara, but because of security problems the school was shifted to Shahkas in Jamrud. “My eldest daughter suffers from mental disabilities. I do not know who will take care of her now,” Khan said. Shehnaz had many plans that day. A brother’s wedding to shop for, some examination papers to correct. S three children. Published in The Express Tribune, March http://tribune.com.pk/story/526852/targeted who-served-khyber-agency-for-22-years GGEETTEEDD!! Targeted attack: Schoolteacher who served Khyber Agency for 22 years shot dead Shehnaz Ishtiaq, who served students in gunned down in front of her teenage son in Jamrud on Tuesday morning. Daniyal, 14, was taking his mother to school when unidentified gunmen on a motorcycle intercepted them and opened fire, leaving her severely injured. “She was shot thrice in the upper dy,” said political administration official Asmatullah Wazir. Following the incident, the school’s owner, Malik Khanwali, shifted her to Hayatabad Medical Complex but she died three hours after being taken for surgery. similar attacks on teachers and aid workers, including that on social worker Farida Afridi and Human Rights Commission of Pakistan Coordinator Zarteef Afridi. Her husband Isthiaq Khan said she did not see this coming and worked fearlessly in the troubled region. “She never told me about any threats or fears she had… she was not scared of militancy in the region. When security problems in Khyber Agency worsened I told her she should transfer to a school in the settled areas, but she said she only wanted to work for the people here. I never thought such a tragedy would happen.” Shehnaz was a headmistress at Community Girls School in Shahkas. Prior to that she was working for a government primary school for girls in Bara, but because of security problems the school was shifted to Shahkas in Jamrud. “My eldest daughter suffers from mental disabilities. I do not know who will take care of her now,” Khan said. Shehnaz had many plans that day. A brother’s wedding to shop to correct. She now leaves behind , March 27th, 2013 http://tribune.com.pk/story/526852/targeted-attack-schoolteacher- years-shot-dead/
  10. 10. 10 Voices from FATA | Jan-Apr 2013 | Issue No. 42 CCAANN PPAAKKIISSTTAANN DDRRIIVVEE TTHHEE TTAALLIIBBAANN OOUUTT OOFF IITTSS TTRRIIBBAALL BBEELLTT?? Impoverished and perpetually neglected by the country’s central government, the semi-autonomous tribal regions of northwest Pakistan have long been a simmering source of both national and regional tension. For years, the country’s central government has tacitly allowed extremist groups like Al Qaeda and the Taliban to use the region as a kind of haven for militants waging conflicts just across the border in neighboring Afghanistan. Meanwhile, the aftershocks of that conflict have spilled over into the tribal areas’ civilian population, disrupting education and economic activity. Now, with the 2014 withdrawal of NATO troops in Afghanistan looming, the Pakistani government is reexamining its role in the long-neglected region and renewing its counterinsurgency efforts against militants. But many analysts, local leaders, and residents question whether the country has either the will or the resources to truly reform its tribal belt. "The tribal areas have been knowingly neglected socially and constitutionally by successive regimes since independence," says Rahimullah Yousafzai, an expert on the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), as the regions are collectively known. Indeed, the Pakistani military claims it has now secured control in many areas of FATA – the most recent win in South Waziristan, where a military operation was launched in 2009. But even those areas have yet to be transferred to the hands of the civilian administration, and many others are not under the government's control at all. A history of division Since British colonization, the region’s seven geographically divided “agencies” have not been an official part of Pakistan. In 1901, to appease tribal leadership wary of a centralized government, the British introduced a separate governing system in FATA, known as the Frontier’s Crimes Regulations (FCR), which continued after Pakistan's independence in 1947. Under the FCR, the tribal areas are governed by federally appointed political administrators who have absolute executive, legislative, and judicial power in each agency. Constitutional civil rights afforded to the rest of Pakistan do not exist. “The government also gives many privileges to the tribal leadership like money, land, etc.," says Safdar Hayat, former president of the Tribal Union of Journalists, who hails from North Waziristan, where the Taliban are headquartered. "These privileges are not allocated as rights of civilians but only for those heads of tribes who do not question the FCR.” Added to that is instability in neighboring Afghanistan, which has bled over into the region and contributed to low educational attainments and high poverty. Along with rigid cultural traditions, these factors have held the tribal areas back in terms of socio- economic development compared with the rest of Pakistan. They have also fueled concern about the insecurity and militancy spreading beyond the region. But bringing the region under the control of the Pakistani government isn’t an easy task, officials argue. A 'warrior-like' people Ethnic groups in Pakistan’s tribal belt have fought against foreign aggression for centuries. The British, Americans, and then Pakistanis all took advantage of their outside reputation as a warrior-like people, setting up the current dynamic. “Pre-independence, the British exploited the folklore of Pashtun bravery to keep the Afghans from entering their colonial-ruled regions of the subcontinent,” says Nizam Dawar, who is a development specialist based in the tribal region. “Post- independence we allied with the Americans, and used the same Pashtun tribes to ward off communism from [the Soviet Union],” says Mr. Dawar. When the US invaded Afghanistan in 2001, however, those same American-trained militants began clashing with NATO forces and then retreating to Pakistan for sanctuary. Also complicating matters, the Pakistani military under Gen. Pervez Musharraf made peace pacts with the militants based in FATA during the NATO-led Afghan war, tacitly allowing them haven, while also continuing to ally itself with the United States against its “war on terror.” Twelve years later, many security experts say the military still does not want to burn bridges with Afghan militants in FATA, which it sees as a potential way to influence what happens to Afghanistan after NATO pulls out in 2014. What next? Analysts, local leaders, and even some in the military emphasise that the legal framework in FATA needs to be repealed and constitutional rights granted to its citizens to ensure social and infrastructural development. “Where is the civilian leadership? Even now, the military is chipping in more than anyone else. We should pull our act together, since we have been neglecting this region for over 65 years,” says Brigadier Hassan Hayat, an operational commander, who has been posted in South Waziristan for the past two years rehabilitating refugees and maintaining law and order. More than $150 million has been pledged by countries like the US, Britain, and Germany in a bid to revive the livelihood of people beset by terrorism and natural disasters in Pakistan, according to statistics by provided by the Multi-Donor Trust Fund. Many of their projects focus on FATA. But despite so much inflow, development workers say the outlook remains grim as aid is channeled through the military – instead of civilian authorities. “The tribal belt has now become a hotbed for war economy. With so much money pouring in from all over the world for development, the main stakeholders – especially the military – are now also financially benefiting from keeping the conflict alive,” Mr. Dawar, the development worker, says. “FATA continues to stay out of constitutional ambit because the military wants absolute control over the strategic belt,” echoing history, he says. “The civilian leadership remains sidelined.” http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20130418/can-pakistan-drive-taliban- out-its-tribal-belt

×