Ece141day8class

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  • Will be here at 7:00 pm
  • https://www.auntsharonsattic.com/store//catalog/images/38957.jpg
  • https://www.auntsharonsattic.com/store//catalog/images/38957.jpg
  • http://www.hudsonvalley.org/images/stories/Union_Church/Image-60_big.jpg Jeremiah window
  • http://www.bergoiata.org/fe/winter/Snow%20Covered%20Forest,%20Finland.jpg
  • I’ll start every class with a book- one you are welcome to use, but not in assignments B or C!  Why? To show you how to connect what you already do to math & science. Each book I’ve chosen melds with the units we are studying that day. Why this book? Unit 31 geometry – my personal hero. And the circle plays such a key role! If you read it- I’ll keep writing to you about it until you finish. 
  • http://nrich.maths.org/public/search.php?search=cuisenaire http://teachertech.rice.edu/Participants/silha/Lessons/cuisen2.html http://www.robynshomeschool.co.za/about/articles/cuisenaire.htm
  • Note: is red, white, white the same as white red white? Shows children the communitive property of addition.
  • Note: is red, white, white the same as white red white? Shows children the communitive property of addition.
  • This and the following problems pose things they cannot solve. Address the next class meeting as part of our five minute focus- what does it feel like when learning something new? Something that doesn’t nec. Turn out the way you think it ought to?
  • Note: is red, white, white the same as white red white? Shows children the communitive property of addition.
  • Note: is red, white, white the same as white red white? Shows children the communitive property of addition.
  • Note: is red, white, white the same as white red white? Shows children the communitive property of addition.
  • Note: is red, white, white the same as white red white? Shows children the communitive property of addition.
  • Note: is red, white, white the same as white red white? Shows children the communitive property of addition.
  • Note: is red, white, white the same as white red white? Shows children the communitive property of addition.
  • See figure on page 403
  • Regrouping, renaming, place value
  • Regrouping, renaming, place value
  • Emphasize 3 [be thorough], 4 [be detailed] 5 [from the text! Unit & page #], 6 [same as always],
  • Make a sign up sheet – have them start signing in
  • First, simple comparing of the numbers, 28 < 36 Then graphing them together onto bar graph – visually seeing what is greatest
  • Same information, show in a different style of graph- “line graphs demand concrete operational thinking because more than one aspect of the data must be focused on at the same time”. Pg 422 For a child to make this they have to connect one day’s data to the next, which means tracking another layer than before.
  • Number line –No matter where we start, 2 or 3, we get to the same solution = 5. Write your own and draw a number line to show that it works
  • Great visual way to show children that subtraction is not commutative.
  • Pg 423. Draw these out on your graph paper [or do it in your text book]. Finish the shape, figure out the coordinates, draw lines of symmetry Example co-ordinates for the first one: (3,1), (6,1), (6,4)
  • How many hands high is a chair? How many feet [human feet] long is a rug? etc
  • So measure is consistent, repeatable, translatable, etc
  • English [inch, foot, yard] Metric [cm, meter]
  • English [inch, foot, yard] Metric [cm, meter]
  • English [inch, foot, yard] Metric [cm, meter]
  • English [inch, foot, yard] Metric [cm, meter]
  • Figure is on page 38 1. Begin by creating an assessment to see if they understand non-standard units. Then decide what you want them to learn about your standard unit Plan an activity to teach it – starting with a decision about what age group you will be teaching to. Find materials up here to support it Write out a detailed plan of what types of questions you would ask Be ready to share with your classmates
  • Ece141day8class

    1. 1. Math & Science for Young Children ECE 141 / 111F winter quarter 2011 Emily McMason Night 8 Units 29-32
    2. 2. Teacher Evaluation <ul><li>… .postponed until next week. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Homework Due <ul><li>Assignment D with Activity 6. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Here. we. are. (along with discussions) <ul><li>Feb 23 (class 8) activity 6 due with assignment D </li></ul><ul><li>March 2 (class 9) activity 7 due (NO analysis- spend time on your online discussions) </li></ul><ul><li>March 9 (class 10) activity 8 aka assignment E due, presentations begin </li></ul><ul><li>March 16 (class 11) presentations conclude </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Be sure to log in early and often to help with the research and the writing. There is only 1 question this week – it is big and you all need to work together to do it. </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>As always, I loved your discussions! </li></ul><ul><li>One thought about the adaptive computer model…what if it were able to be done using voice recognition software? And kids could solve the problem explaining their thoughts as they went… </li></ul>
    7. 7. WAIT! <ul><li>This is your only extra credit opportunity for the quarter…it is A LOT of work- but I think you are up for the task. Are you ready? </li></ul>
    8. 8. WAIT! <ul><li>Bring a to class next week. </li></ul>
    9. 9. On their album ‘Field Trip’
    10. 10. <ul><li>Close your eyes, take a deep breath, relax. </li></ul><ul><li>Slowly let your mind wander to an image or event which instills in you great awe. Find that which is magical, majestic, full of wonder. </li></ul><ul><li>Open you eyes and write about it. </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
    11. 11. <ul><li>What does your image or event of awe reveal about you? Religion? Nature? Spirituality? Learning Style? Values? </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
    12. 12.    
    13. 13.    
    14. 14. Numinous <ul><li>spiritual, religious, divine, holy, sacred; mysterious, otherworldly, unearthly, transcendent. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Contact Carl Sagan May each of you find the numinous
    16. 16. <ul><li>Split yourselves into groups, share your activities. </li></ul>Activity #6
    17. 17. Unit 29: fractions
    18. 18. Unit 29: fractions <ul><li>Page 385 </li></ul><ul><li>“ Even nine-year-olds have difficulty with fractions at the symbolic level. This would indicate that for most children fraction symbols cannot safely be introduced until well into the intermediate level (grade 4 or higher).” </li></ul>
    19. 19. Unit 29: fractions <ul><li>Lesson for us (class aimed at 0 to 8)? </li></ul><ul><li>Fraction notation is NOT safe for small children….  </li></ul><ul><li>So we are going to limit ourselves to the following ideas: parts, wholes, halves, thirds, fourths. </li></ul>
    20. 20. Unit 29: fractions <ul><li>My first fractions… </li></ul>
    21. 21. Unit 29: fractions <ul><li>Find two partners and come and get one set of Cuisenaire rods.° </li></ul><ul><li>Open your bag and explore your pieces. </li></ul><ul><li>Which one is your favorite? (mine is the lime green). </li></ul><ul><li>By the way…Cuisenaire rods are amazing for creating graphs, +, -, x, ÷, counting, patterning… </li></ul><ul><li>° today’s lesson is dedicated to the memory of Jean Skov. </li></ul>
    22. 22. Unit 29: fractions <ul><li>Use a purple rod as the ‘whole’. How many ‘parts’ combinations can you create? (ex: 1 red + 2 whites = purple) Line up all of your ideas. </li></ul>
    23. 23. Unit 29: fractions <ul><li>Use a brown rod as the ‘whole’. Which rods can you use to show the idea of ‘half’? Line up all of your ideas. </li></ul>
    24. 24. Unit 29: fractions <ul><li>Use a blue rod as the ‘whole’. Which rods can you use to show the ideas of half and a third? Line up all of your ideas. </li></ul>
    25. 25. Unit 29: fractions <ul><li>Use an orange plus a red rod as the ‘whole’. Which rods can you use to show the ideas of half, third, quarter? Line up all of your ideas. </li></ul>
    26. 26. Cuisenaire Rods <ul><li>What is the pattern? </li></ul><ul><li>What comes next? </li></ul><ul><li>Can you create the next 3 sets? </li></ul><ul><li>° by the way, your book misspells them as cuisinaire </li></ul>
    27. 27. Cuisenaire Rods <ul><li>How many different walls can be made using just rods of two colors? </li></ul><ul><li>Have a look at these examples - how would you make the next wall? </li></ul>
    28. 28. Cuisenaire Rods <ul><li>I made a train was made from three rods which were all different colors. </li></ul><ul><li>It was the same length as three purple rods, but made up of: black, red and green rods. </li></ul><ul><li>Can you make a different train, the same length as mine, with three rods which are all different colors? </li></ul><ul><li>° today’s lesson is dedicated to the memory of Jean Skov </li></ul>
    29. 29. Cuisenaire Rods <ul><li>Can you make one the same length using no colors that I used? </li></ul><ul><li>It is possible to make a train that was the same length as mine using four differently colored rods. Can you do it? </li></ul><ul><li>° today’s lesson is dedicated to the memory of Jean Skov </li></ul>
    30. 30. Cuisenaire Rods <ul><li>Create a train which was is as short as it could be using four differently colored rods. Can you find a rod that is the same length as the train? </li></ul>
    31. 31. Cuisenaire Rods <ul><li>Make a train that is two black rods and a light green one. </li></ul><ul><li>Can you now build a train of the same length, using four differently colored rods, none of which is white? </li></ul>
    32. 32. <ul><li>Write down all of your feelings that first come to mind about the Cuisenaire rods work. </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
    33. 33. <ul><li>What was it like to try and figure out something completely new? How did it feel to try and solve something that had no solution? </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
    34. 34. <ul><li>Kids feel this way every day. </li></ul><ul><li>The imagery of spending all day ‘left handed’. </li></ul>Five Minute Focus
    35. 35. Unit 30: Numbers Above 10 and Place Value <ul><li>“ Place value is one of the most difficult concepts for young children to grasp. Being able to rote and rational count above 10 is only a beginning step on the way to an understanding of place value.” page 399 </li></ul>
    36. 36. Unit 30: Numbers Above 10 and Place Value <ul><li>Page 400 </li></ul><ul><li>“ On the average, first graders can learn to read, write and understand two-digit numbers, second graders three-digit numbers, and third graders four-digit numbers.” </li></ul>
    37. 37. Conservation of large numbers <ul><li>Come up to the front and grab 50 Unifix cubes. </li></ul>
    38. 38. Conservation of large numbers <ul><li>Make a pile on your desk of some random amount of cubes. There must be more than 10. </li></ul>
    39. 39. Conservation of large numbers <ul><li>Make a group of 10 cubes and move them away from the first pile. </li></ul><ul><li>How many loose cubes do you have left? </li></ul><ul><li>How many do you have all together? </li></ul><ul><li>On paper write down 1 tens and ones. </li></ul>
    40. 40. Conservation of large numbers <ul><li>Do you have enough to make another 10? </li></ul><ul><li>Now how many loose cubes do you have? </li></ul><ul><li>How many do you have all together? </li></ul><ul><li>On paper write down __ tens and ones. </li></ul><ul><li>Continue this process until you have the maximum amount of 10s possible for your pile. </li></ul>
    41. 41. Conservation of large numbers <ul><li>What skills or concepts will this activity help children with? </li></ul><ul><li>What struck you about this activity? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you use it tomorrow with your students? </li></ul>
    42. 42. Constructing models of two-digit numbers <ul><li>Find a partner. Combine your cubes. </li></ul><ul><li>Take one piece of paper and draw a line down the center. </li></ul><ul><li>Label the section on the left 10s, and on the right 1s. </li></ul>
    43. 43. Constructing models of two-digit numbers <ul><li>Partner 1 name a two digit number. </li></ul><ul><li>Partner 2 uses the combined cubes to make a model of the numeral selected. </li></ul><ul><li>Switch jobs and repeat as often as you like. </li></ul>
    44. 44. Constructing models of two-digit numbers <ul><li>What skills or concepts will this activity help children with? </li></ul><ul><li>What struck you about this activity? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you use it tomorrow with your students? </li></ul>
    45. 45. Addition & Subtraction
    46. 46. Addition & Subtraction
    47. 47. Addition & Subtraction
    48. 48. Do we have enough to make another 10?
    49. 49. Addition & Subtraction
    50. 50. Addition & Subtraction <ul><li>Now, starting with the 44 cubes, subtract 25. How would you do it? </li></ul>
    51. 51. Addition & Subtraction <ul><li>What skills or concepts will this activity help children with? </li></ul><ul><li>What struck you about this activity? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you use it tomorrow with your students? </li></ul>
    52. 52. To 1’s, 10’s and beyond… <ul><li>How could you use these same manipulatives to teach 100’s? 1000’s? </li></ul>
    53. 53. <ul><li>If We Have Time… </li></ul>
    54. 54. <ul><li>Grab your syllabus- let’s look at assignment E </li></ul><ul><li>Here is your chance to let your imagination fly! Put together an original activity that includes math and science concepts. </li></ul>
    55. 55. <ul><li>You will need to create a handout for the instructor and your classmates that should include the following: </li></ul><ul><li>1. name of the activity </li></ul><ul><li>2. materials used [ex: 3 pipe cleaners, 1 felt square] </li></ul><ul><li>3. directions on how to put it together </li></ul><ul><li>4. An explanation of how the activity will be used by the child[ren] </li></ul><ul><li>5. identification of the math and science concepts that are discovered through this activity and what units they are from in our text </li></ul><ul><li>6. identification of the age group for which it is appropriate and why [see ‘concepts and skills’ page 3], ‘standards for school mathematics’ pages 7-11, and Appendix A Developmental Assessment Tasks, page 583 </li></ul><ul><li>7. A rubric that you create specifically for the activity [see example on page 65] </li></ul>
    56. 56. <ul><li>You will need to have all of your classmates participate in your activity. When your classmates engage in your activity you will need to: </li></ul><ul><li>1. introduce the activity </li></ul><ul><li>2. encourage exploration </li></ul><ul><li>3. allow for math and science concepts or vocabulary to be heard and understood </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>At the end of your presentation you will need to answer any questions from your classmates. </li></ul>
    57. 57. <ul><li>This unit builds complexity onto that which we’ve already covered: </li></ul><ul><li>Unit 12 – Early Geometry: Shape </li></ul><ul><li>Unit 13 – Early Geometry: Spatial Sense </li></ul><ul><li>Unit 20 – Interpreting Data Using Graphs </li></ul><ul><li>Unit 25 – Higher Level Activities & Concepts </li></ul>Unit 31 geometry, data collection & algebraic thinking
    58. 58. <ul><li>What kind of complexity are we adding? </li></ul><ul><li>Graphing </li></ul><ul><li>from bar graph -> line graph </li></ul><ul><li>Addition & subtraction </li></ul><ul><li> from oral -> number line </li></ul><ul><li>Shapes </li></ul><ul><li>from naming -> finding symmetry </li></ul>Unit 31 geometry, data collection & algebraic thinking
    59. 59. <ul><li>What kind of complexity are we adding? </li></ul><ul><li>Graphing </li></ul><ul><li>from bar graph -> line graph </li></ul>Unit 31 geometry, data collection & algebraic thinking
    60. 61. Unit 31 geometry, data collection & algebraic thinking
    61. 62. <ul><li>What kind of complexity are we adding? </li></ul><ul><li>Addition & subtraction </li></ul><ul><li> from oral -> number line </li></ul>Unit 31 geometry, data collection & algebraic thinking
    62. 63. <ul><li>This shows the commutative property of addition. </li></ul>Number line
    63. 64. <ul><li>Does this work for subtraction? </li></ul><ul><li>Draw a number line. Solve these two problems and draw them on the number line: </li></ul><ul><li>3 – 2 = </li></ul><ul><li>2 – 3 = </li></ul>Number line
    64. 65. <ul><li>Shapes </li></ul><ul><li>from naming -> finding symmetry </li></ul><ul><li>from 2-D -> 3 -D </li></ul>Unit 31 geometry, data collection & algebraic thinking
    65. 66. <ul><li>Find a partner(s) and get a Geoboard </li></ul>
    66. 67. <ul><li>With one rubber band per shape, make as many shapes as you can. </li></ul>
    67. 68. <ul><li>On paper, draw the shapes you have created. </li></ul><ul><li>Once you have created as many as you can, join with another group and compare your work. </li></ul>
    68. 69. <ul><li>Working with your original partner, draw the line(s) of symmetry for each of your shapes. </li></ul>
    69. 70. <ul><li>Rejoin with other other group and compare lines of symmetry. </li></ul>
    70. 72. <ul><li>Where did we start with units for children? </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    71. 73. <ul><li>Where did we start with units for children? </li></ul><ul><li>In the preoperational stage we used arbitrary or non-standard units. </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    72. 74. <ul><li>Where did we start with units for children? </li></ul><ul><li>In the preoperational stage we used arbitrary or non-standard units. </li></ul><ul><li>What were some examples of that? </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    73. 75. <ul><li>Why do we need standard units? </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    74. 76. <ul><li>Why do we need standard units? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the two major types of units used in the United States? </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    75. 77. <ul><li>Why do we need standard units? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the two major types of units used in the United States? </li></ul><ul><li>Which one is used by overwhelmingly by the rest of the world and by scientists? (hmmm….can you smell my bias about this?) </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    76. 78. <ul><li>When do we start introducing standard units? </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    77. 79. <ul><li>When do we start introducing standard units? </li></ul><ul><li>Well…it depends on what we are measuring! </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    78. 81. Keep it simple! Start with instruments that are marked only with the unit being used.
    79. 82. <ul><li>If We Have Time… </li></ul>
    80. 83. <ul><li>Count off around the room starting with 1 going to 7 and then starting over again. </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with standard units
    81. 84. <ul><li>Move to sit with your same number people. </li></ul><ul><li>1’s will work on length </li></ul><ul><li>2’s = volume </li></ul><ul><li>3’s = area </li></ul><ul><li>4’s = weight </li></ul><ul><li>5’s = temperature </li></ul><ul><li>6’s = time </li></ul><ul><li>7’s = money </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with standard units
    82. 85. <ul><li> </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with Standard Units
    83. 86. <ul><li>1. Begin by creating an assessment to see if they understand non-standard units. </li></ul><ul><li>Then decide what you want them to learn about your standard unit. </li></ul><ul><li>Plan an activity to teach it – starting with a decision about the age group that is appropriate for your unit. </li></ul><ul><li>Find materials up here to support it. </li></ul><ul><li>Write out a detailed plan of what types of questions you would ask to guide their learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Be ready to share with your classmates. </li></ul>Unit 32 Measurement with standard units

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