Methods used to influence decision makers
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Methods used to influence decision makers

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Methods used to influence decision makers Methods used to influence decision makers Presentation Transcript

  • METHODS used to influence Decision makers
  • Direct action
  • Direct action
    Any action seeking to achieve an immediate or direct result, esp. an action against an established authority or powerful institution.
     
    This includes Picketing, strikes, blockades, demonstrations, and protests.
  • Direct action
  • Lobbying
  • Lobbying
    To try to influence (an official) to take a desired action.
    Usually trying to get politicians to support their issue.
  • Lobbying
  • Petitions, pre-printed letters, postcards
  • Petitions, pre-printed letters, postcards
    A formally written request, showing the names of people who support an issue. This is then directed to the decision makers.
  • Petitions, pre-printed letters, postcards
  • Letters
  • Letters
    Written personal letters to Decision makers stating their position on an issue.
  • Advertising (use of media)
  • Advertising (use of media)
    Paid announcements newspaper, Television, radio
    Stickers
    Pamphlets
    Internet
    DVD’s
  • Advertising (use of media)
  • Use of prominent people
  • Use of prominent people
    Asking people who are well know and respected by the community to help support their cause.
  • Use of prominent people
  • Own research
  • Own research
    Interest groups fund their own scientific or social reports to provide evidence on an issue
  • Forming partnerships
  • Forming partnerships
    Groups of similar interest join together to pool their resources.
  • Forming partnerships
    http://www.bluewedges.org/index.php?page=about_us
  • Information meetings
  • Information meetings
    Used to engage and inform the community
  • Information meetings