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    Copy of 320week3 Copy of 320week3 Presentation Transcript

    • Culture and Globalization Origins of the Modern World February 6, 2013
    • Marks: Origins of the Modern WorldHow would you summarize the main goals of thebook? In other words, what is the author trying toshow, and why?
    • Marks: Origins of the Modern World1. The book tries to show how the current worldsystem got put in place -- the historical, economic,political, social forces that produced modernglobalization.2. In doing so, it attempts to challenge Eurocentricaccounts of the world.
    • WesternizationWhat did we say last week are the debatesabout globalization as "Westernization"?How does this connect to the critique ofEurocentrism in Marks?
    • Conceptual Tools (pages 10-13)● historical contingency● accident● conjuncture
    • Before the Modern World SystemWhat are some of the interesting cases orexamples Marks uses to demonstrate the roleof the non-European world in this history?
    • Industrial RevolutionWhat do we mean by the term "industrialrevolution"?How does Marks complicate the usual story ofindustrialization?
    • Industrial Revolution: Why Britain?Why was Britain the center of industrialization?● Naval power and war● An industry suited to industrializing = cotton● Economic structure that allowed for it to take advantage of that industry = colonialism
    • Britain: Slavery and Cotton● Cotton industry - there was money to be made and it was rapidly expanding, so it attracted investment●● Machinery was cheap, easy to construct, and promised quick returns●● Raw materials - extracted from colonies through slave labor, thus expanding supply; accident of coal supply and steam power
    • French RevolutionThe Declaration of the Rights of Man andCitizens (1789) states, "The source of allsovereignty residesessentially in the nation."What does "nation" meanhere and what is thesignificance of this?
    • New Political FormationsThe French Revolution helps establish themodern notion of the nation-state, whichconnects three things: the state (government) the nation (citizenry) the land (territory)And they are connected in a Constitutionalframework.