5of13 - Making Information Pay 2010 (Jabin White, Wolters Kluwer)
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    5of13 - Making Information Pay 2010 (Jabin White, Wolters Kluwer) 5of13 - Making Information Pay 2010 (Jabin White, Wolters Kluwer) Presentation Transcript

    • Practical Approaches to Change and its Impact on People Jabin White Director of Strategic Content Wolters Kluwer Health May 6, 2010
    • Agenda  Introduction  What does all this change mean to me?  Lessons from Changeville (via a case study), and how to know when you can‘t turn back  Closing Thoughts Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 2
    • Introduction: Who Am I?  Director of Strategic Content for Wolters Kluwer Health – Professional & Education — Responsible for making sure content flows through company more efficiently (DTDs, Content Management, Authoring Tools, Semantic Enrichment, Product Information Management, etc.)  Wolters Kluwer Health includes: — Lippincott Williams & Wilkins titles — Ovid — UpToDate — Provation Order Sets — Drug Facts & Comparisons — Medi-Span — Clin-eguide Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 3
    • Baseline Assumption: The World of Publishing is Changing, Get Over It  Understand that change = opportunity  Control change – ie, change for the better, not for the sake of change — A subtle difference, but a critical one. Realize that your business fundamentals can remain the same in the time of great change.  Understand that an environment that tolerates failure is critical to change and growth  So what does all this mean to me? Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 4
    • Change is inevitable – except from a vending machine. - Robert Gallagher WHAT DOES ALL THIS MEAN TO ME? 5
    • Impact on Different Groups  Editorial/Product Management — ―Getting close to customer‖ is no longer a nice-to-have but a necessity  Production — Probably biggest impact, innovation while keeping the store running, and ―last link in the chain‖ problem gets worse  Sales & Marketing — Opportunity for super value if close enough to customer; figuring out how to sell less to more; business model flexibility  Executive Suite — Patience in a time of impatience; stomach for infrastructure, promoting an atmosphere that tolerates mistakes Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 6
    • Why do we think failure is bad?  Because society tells us so?  Many companies create an environment wherein failure is unacceptable  Studies show failure as a learning experience is incredibly more effective than success  Sports psychology has something to say about this  Obviously we don‘t want to encourage failure, but promote acceptance/recognition of it, and learning from it — ―I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.‖ — ―I find my greatest pleasure, and so my reward, in the work that precedes what the world calls success. ―  Thomas Edison Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 7
    • What The Experts Say  Peter Drucker: ―The 9-month memo‖  Jim Collins: ―Extreme personal humility with intense professional will‖ — A different sort of leader: singles and doubles instead of home runs  George Eliot: ―Life is like playing chess with each piece having thoughts, feelings, and motives of their own. It is complex beyond reckoning‖  Every move, every decision, is a partial failure, to be corrected by the next one (even walking) Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 8
    • ―The reasonable man conforms himself to the world. The unreasonable man conforms the world to himself. Therefore, all change depends upon the unreasonable man.‖ George Bernard Shaw PRACTICAL LESSONS ON CHANGE, VIA CASE STUDY 9
    • Case Study – The Background  STM Publisher in the late 1990s  SGML was a known thing, decent penetration in journals, and XML was being developed  Business case for providing journal files in SGML was getting to be a ―slam dunk,‖ but *how* exactly that was accomplished was still being figured out Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 10
    • Case Study: Change Before Its Time?  Built a DTD** for journals  Built a DTD** Suite for books — Both used by compositors for post-print conversion  Started building Editing Tools that were SGML aware  Upper Management was on board, and realized the long-term savings of producing data once and using multiple times **DTD = Document Type Definition, the ―road map‖ of an SGML/XML document Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 12
    • Case Study: Change Before Its Time?  Built a DTD** for journals  Built a DTD** Suite for books — Both used by compositors for post-print conversion  Started building Editing Tools that were SGML aware  Upper Management was on board, and realized the long-term savings of producing data once and using multiple times Or so I thought! **DTD = Document Type Definition, the ―road map‖ of an SGML/XML document Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 13
    • Case Study: What Went Wrong?  Upper Management changed, as it sometimes does  Middle Management not engaged properly (we learned this later)  DTDs were too ―hard‖ to work with, the editing tools added time to copyeditors‘ workflow — Result: Tools abandoned, DTDs put in a drawer  DTDs continued to be used for journals, but a ―mixed bag‖ for books Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 14
    • Case Study: Post Mortem  Knowing the difference between real commitment and ‗lip service‘ is a critical skill for change agents  Knowing *when* to change is as important as knowing *how* to change  Must tie the *reasons* for change to the causes of pain in people‘s minds – we were trying to solve a problem that people didn‘t realize they had  My ―20-60-20 Rule,‖ learned the hard way Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 15
    • Where to Focus? The ―Early Adopter‖ • Sure, I get it. Tell me what to do! 20% The ―No Way, Jose‖ • A no looking for a question to 20% answer The Middle • I may be willing, but show me 60% •A really unfortunate note: People aren‘t always what they seem, and they don‘t always stay in their respective boxes Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 16
    • Where to Focus? The ―Early Adopter‖ • Sure, I get it. Tell me what to do! 20% The ―No Way, Jose‖ • A no looking for a question to 20% answer The Middle • I may be willing, but show me 60% •A really unfortunate note: People aren‘t always what they seem, and they don‘t always stay in their respective boxes Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 17
    • Where to Focus? The ―Early Adopter‖ • Sure, I get it. Tell me what to do! 20% The ―No Way, Jose‖ • A no looking for a question to 20% answer The Middle • I may be willing, but show me 60% •A really unfortunate note: People aren‘t always what they seem, and they don‘t always stay in their respective boxes Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 18
    • Case Study: A Happy Ending?  I‘m back, baby!  The book DTDs were maintained, and they are now being put to excellent use  The world has moved forward in its embrace of XML (a rising tide lifts all angle brackets?), so the power of these DTDs is ready to be unleashed  That doesn‘t make what we did in 1999 right; it makes us lucky — If you predict your baseball team is going to win the World Series every year, it doesn‘t make you a genius the year that they do  (See White, Jabin. The 2004 Red Sox)  Everything new becomes old, then maybe new again (if you wait long enough) — This also explains my wardrobe Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 19
    • How To Know There‘s No Turning Back 1. From an XML perspective: when you‘re scratching your head thinking: ―Why am I paying to do essentially the same thing twice?‖ 2. From a cultural perspective: when you realize you are asking people to do things you have no confidence in their ability to do 3. From a systems/tools perspective: when you cannot support said people with the systems necessary to do what they need to do 4. From a product development perspective: when your infrastructure is preventing you from doing the things you want to do (I feel your pain!) 5. From a customer perspective: when they are asking for things you can‘t provide (see No. 3 above), or when delivering these things cannot be done in a cost-effective way Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 20
    • AND NOW, BACK ON MY SOAPBOX 21
    • Impact on People  Not everyone will adapt, but they should be given the chance  Just because we have to be ―experts‖ at technology doesn‘t mean we still don‘t need editorial expertise — Publishing is still part art, part science  Technology is an ―enabler‖ of what we do, not a replacement  The way some technology companies talk about content and its importance, it‘s a good thing I‘m a pacifist  Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 22
    • Closing Thoughts  There *is* no turning back  It is no longer acceptable or responsible to talk about *when* your organization will change; the conversation needs to be around *how*  The point of no return is behind us  People matter more than we might think, but they have to be set up to succeed  Yes, digital publishing is hard, but no one ever said it was easy! Jabin White – Wolters Kluwer Health – jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 23
    • THANK YOU Jabin White Director of Strategic Content Wolters Kluwer Health Jabin.white@wolterskluwer.com 215.521.8911 Twitter: @jabinwhite Blog: Technically Speaking at http://www.bookbusinessmag.com/channel/technically-speaking 24