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BEST PRACTICES,®LLBest Practices, LLC Strategic Benchmarking ResearchProfessional Medical Education Excellence:Benchmarkin...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLTable of ContentsI. Executive Summary pp. 4-13 Research Overview pp. 4 Universe of Learning pp. 5 Tra...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLTable of ContentsVII. Performance Measurement pp.76-84• Assessing Medical Education Programs to Demonstr...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLTopics IncludedStudy Overview• Funding channels utilized by MedicalEducation groups• Effectiveness of di...
BEST PRACTICES,®LL5Copyright © Best Practices®, LLC31 Healthcare Companies Provide Universe of LearningThis study engaged ...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLProfessional SocietyUtilization &Grant TrendsIn-Class & ConferenceFunding TrendsMultidisciplinaryEducati...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLProgram Development & Regional Trends: Findings & InsightsBenchmark Finding Regarding Program Developmen...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLMedEd Budgets Range Widely Across Both SectorsThe companies within this study’s Medical Device Segment a...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLMedEd Funding Most Often Supports Accredited GrantsGrants, specifically Accredited, are the most utilize...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLPharma Favor Grant Funding; Device Favor StaffingDevice companies focused more on staffing and grants wh...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLDevice Sector Typically Develops Its Own ProgramsIn contrast to the pharma sector, the device industry t...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLPharma Pushes Program Development to VendorsRegulatory requirements and compliance concerns have pushed ...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLDownside of Multidisciplinary Education is losingfocus on HCP with biggest impact: physicianWhile a majo...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLMultidisciplinary Programs Projected to GrowA majority of organizations in both the device and pharma se...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLDevice Segment: Physicians Value Conferences,Academic Centers for Accredited EducationA majority of devi...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLPharma Segment: Accredited Programs in Varietyof Settings Seen as Highly Valued by PhysiciansThe pharma ...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLDevice Segment: Roundtables, Case Studies AreMost Valuable Information Sources For PhysiciansRoundtable ...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLEducation Presented by Peers Considered Most Reliable18Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCThe educator ofte...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLOutcomes & Practice Adoption Rates Are Favored MedDev MetricsMedical Device companies rate four performa...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLDevelop a Series of Metrics to Consistently Assess ProgramsOne medical device leader who oversees his or...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLMedDev Funding Rising for Online, Tablet & Mobile TechnologyQ. Please note whether your funding for diff...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLNew Digital Technologies Permit Greater Flexibility & Lower CostIn the current Medical Education environ...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLPharma Companies Are Increasing Technology-EnabledFunding Even More Enthusiastically Than MedDevQ. Pleas...
BEST PRACTICES,®LLBest Practices, LLC6350 Quadrangle Drive, Suite 200Chapel Hill, NC 27517www.best-in-class.comAbout Best ...
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Professional Medical Education Excellence: Benchmarking Critical Program Trends Transforming the Medical Device and Biopharmaceutical Marketplace

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Professional Medical Education programs are a key way that healthcare professionals learn how to safely and effectively use new medical devices and biopharmaceutical products. While this remains as true today as it was in the past, the changing financial and regulatory landscape has created a challenging environment for Medical Education groups.

To succeed in this environment, Medical Education groups must efficiently use their resources and carefully control their content. In short, Medical Education groups have to ensure their programs have the right content, presenters, and venues to not only pass regulatory muster but also to attract healthcare practitioners.

And as budgets across both pharma and medical device continue to shrink, it has become critical for Medical Education groups to demonstrate the value of their programs to the organization.

Best Practices®, LLC conducted this evidence-based benchmark study to inform Medical Education leaders on emerging trends regarding funding, program types, delivery channels, program effectiveness and value drivers.

Data in this report are presented in two segments: Medical Device and Pharmaceutical.

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  • Transcript of "Professional Medical Education Excellence: Benchmarking Critical Program Trends Transforming the Medical Device and Biopharmaceutical Marketplace"

    1. 1. BEST PRACTICES,®LLBest Practices, LLC Strategic Benchmarking ResearchProfessional Medical Education Excellence:Benchmarking Critical Program Trends Transforming theMedical Device and Biopharmaceutical Marketplace
    2. 2. BEST PRACTICES,®LLTable of ContentsI. Executive Summary pp. 4-13 Research Overview pp. 4 Universe of Learning pp. 5 Transforming the Medical Education Landscape pp. 6 Key Findings pp. 7-13I. Universe of Learning: Key Demographics of Participating Companies pp. 14-19II. Investment Benchmarks & Trends pp. 20-36 Medical Education Spending is an Uneven Landscape ReflectingGrowth, Decline and ShiftsI. Program Benchmarks & Trends pp. 37-50 Developing and Deploying Medical Education Programs• Educating For Better Outcomes pp. 51-60I. Multi-disciplinary programs are on the RiseVI. Program & Educator Impact Ratings pp. 61-75 The Programs & Professionals That Best Educate HealthCare Providers
    3. 3. BEST PRACTICES,®LLTable of ContentsVII. Performance Measurement pp.76-84• Assessing Medical Education Programs to Demonstrate ValueVII. Technology Benchmarks & Trends pp. 85-97 New Digital Technologies Are Changing Medical Education DeploymentVII. Medical Education Program Benchmarks pp. 98-115• Factors Shaping Medical Education ProgramsVII. Appendix pp. 116-119 ACCME Annual Reports – 2010-2011VII. About Best Practices, LLC pp. 120
    4. 4. BEST PRACTICES,®LLTopics IncludedStudy Overview• Funding channels utilized by MedicalEducation groups• Effectiveness of different MedicalEducation program types and deliverychannels• Use of multi-disciplinary Medical Educationprograms• Trends in grants to professionalsocieties/associations for accredited andnon-accredited education programs• Rating of company professionals mostvalued by physicians for education• Future trends in Medical Educationprograms and technologyResearch Objective: This benchmarking studyinvestigates emerging Medical Education trends atmedical device and pharmaceutical organizationsregarding funding, program types, deliverychannels, program effectiveness and valuedrivers.Research findings provide industry metrics thatcan serve as a reference point for MedicalEducation leaders in future budgeting andstrategic planning. Methodology: Best Practices, LLC engaged 32Medical Education leaders at 31 companiesthrough a benchmarking survey instrument. Inaddition, research analysts conducted deep-diveexecutive interviews with 5 selected respondentsto collect qualitative data and insights.Research Project Objectives, Methodology & TopicsBest Practices, LLC conducted this benchmarking study to identify program and funding trends forMedical Education groups in medical device and biopharmaceutical sectors.4Copyright © Best Practices®, LLC
    5. 5. BEST PRACTICES,®LL5Copyright © Best Practices®, LLC31 Healthcare Companies Provide Universe of LearningThis study engaged medical education leaders from 31 leading healthcare companies. Segmentationanalysis was key to examining trends and effective practices. Fourteen participants represent theMedical Device Segment and 18 participants represent the Pharma Segment . In addition, deep-diveinterviews were conducted with five participating companies to gather additional insights.(n=18)(n=14)Benchmark Class:Medical Device Segment: Pharma Segment:
    6. 6. BEST PRACTICES,®LLProfessional SocietyUtilization &Grant TrendsIn-Class & ConferenceFunding TrendsMultidisciplinaryEducation TrendsMedical EducationDevelopment & Delivery6Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCKey Findings: Medical Education Benchmarks Present Study SnapshotMany observations have been harvested from the study. These are some of the key benchmarks to surface.The device and pharma segments are at opposites in their approaches to MedEd program development anddelivery. Two-thirds of the device segment develop and deliver their programs whereas two-thirds of thepharma segment utilize third-parties to develop and deliver their programs.Both segments embrace multidisciplinary education to support better outcomes. Multidisciplinary programsmake up about half of both segments’ education programs. Also, a majority of both segments thinkmultidisciplinary programs will grow over the next 2-3 years.Both segments utilize professional societies for roughly two-thirds of their company sponsored accreditedprograms and one third of their non-accredited programs. Meanwhile, a majority of both segments expectsociety grants for accredited and non-accredited programs to either stay flat or decrease in the next 2-3years; a quarter of both segments expect grants to decline for both program types in the same period.Half of the device segment expects funding to decrease in the next 2-3 years for in-class education andconferences. Half of the pharma segment expects funding to stay the same. Meanwhile, 60 percent of theMedEd programs in both segments are currently delivered in a in-class setting.In next 2-3 years, both segments anticipate technology/Internet supported education programs will increase;however, most of pharma see it increasing 11-20+% while only 34% of device see it increasing that much.A majority of both segments feel physicians highly value accredited programs at conferences/congresses andacademic centers. A majority of both segments also feel that physicians highly value patient case studies ascurricular topics and non-company affiliated physicians are highly valued presenters.Reshaped by regulatory & political pressures, Pharma principally funds education through Medical Affairs;almost two-thirds of the Medical Device segment funds through Marketing. This is likely to change.Medical EducationTechnology TrendsPrograms, Venues thatPhysicians ValueMarketing Still a MajorFunding Source forMedical Device Sector
    7. 7. BEST PRACTICES,®LLProgram Development & Regional Trends: Findings & InsightsBenchmark Finding Regarding Program DevelopmentEducation Program Development and Delivery: The medical device and pharmaceutical sectorsembrace strikingly different approaches to the development and delivery of medical education programs.• Two-thirds of medical device participants’ education programs are developed and delivered in-house while a third of programs are developed and delivered by third-party vendors.• Pharma takes the opposite path: two-thirds of programs are developed and delivered by vendorswhile a third are developed and delivered in-house.• Pharma’s different program development approach reflects regulatory and political pressuresdriving pharma to retreat from hands-on involvement in education development and deployment.The device sector may find itself facing the same pressures. Indeed, several device firms havestepped back to rethink their CME strategies because of compliance issues.Benchmark Finding Regarding Regional Education TrendsRegional Education Trends: Almost 90 percent of the device segment said they will be expandingmedical education efforts into three regions: Latin America, Emerging Markets and Asia. Pharma,meanwhile, increased its education efforts in these regions years ago. Nevertheless, almost half of thepharma segment expects to continue expanding education in emerging markets and Latin America in thenext 2-3 years. Interestingly, about half the pharma participants expect to also expand efforts in the U.S.7Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCThe following findings and insights emerged from the analysis of the Medical Education performancebenchmark and lessons learned interviews with key companies and MedEd leaders.
    8. 8. BEST PRACTICES,®LLMedEd Budgets Range Widely Across Both SectorsThe companies within this study’s Medical Device Segment averaged $14M whereas thecompanies within the Pharma averaged $13M in global Medical Education investment.Q. Please estimate in U.S. Dollars the aggregate global investment level dedicated to all medical education functionsand activities during the last fiscal year at your company/unit, to include education programs (Accredited and Non-Accredited), grants, fellowships, MedEd staffing FTEs, training centers, and MedEd infrastructure :8Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCMedical Education Resource BenchmarkAggregate Global InvestmentLevel Dedicated to All MedicalEducation & ActivitiesMax$50,000,00075th Percentile$25,000,000Mean$14,044,444Median$5,000,00025th Percentile$1,500,000Min$1,000,000Aggregate Global Investment LevelDedicated to All Medical Education& Activities$80,000,000$13,000,000$13,026,538$5,000,000$3,495,000$500,000Medical Device: Pharma:(n=9) (n=13)
    9. 9. BEST PRACTICES,®LLMedEd Funding Most Often Supports Accredited GrantsGrants, specifically Accredited, are the most utilized funding distribution channel forMedical Education. Some organizations – predominately pharma companies – also utilizesponsorships. Nearly 40% of the Device segment used Accredited fellowships.Q. Which, if any, funding distribution channels are utilized by your medical education group to supportAccredited and Non-Accredited education? (Check all that apply)9Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCSupporting External Education Through Corporate Funding% ResponsesMedical Device: Pharma:(n=15)(n=13)AccreditedNon-Accredited% ResponsesAccreditedNon-Accredited
    10. 10. BEST PRACTICES,®LLPharma Favor Grant Funding; Device Favor StaffingDevice companies focused more on staffing and grants whereas Pharma invested mainly ingrants and vendors.(n=13)Q. Please estimate the percentage of your annual MedEd funding that is invested in these key areas(The sum of all sources should equal 100% of your MedEd program budget):10Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCAverage Breakdown of MedEd Funding by AreaMedical Device: Pharma:(n=16)
    11. 11. BEST PRACTICES,®LLDevice Sector Typically Develops Its Own ProgramsIn contrast to the pharma sector, the device industry typically still develops a majority of its medicaleducation programs in-house. The different approaches to program development is likely the result ofregulatory issues pushing pharma to retreat from hands-on involvement in education . The device sectormay find itself facing the same pressure and, indeed, a number of major device firms have stepped backfrom CME because of compliance issues.(n=11)What is the current mix of company-developed education programs versus external third-partydeveloped programs? (Each row should add up to 100%)11Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCMedical Device: Development of MedicalEducation ProgramsMax 100%75th Percentile 97.5%Mean 60%Median 60%25th Percentile 27.5%Min 0%In Company:Max 100%75th Percentile 72.5%Mean 40%Median 40%25th Percentile 2.5%Min 0%Third-party:
    12. 12. BEST PRACTICES,®LLPharma Pushes Program Development to VendorsRegulatory requirements and compliance concerns have pushed most pharma to use third-partyorganizations to develop their medical education programs. This is certainly the case with CMEprograms and is becoming the trend for other types of education programs.(n=14)What is the current mix of company-developed education programs versus external third-partydeveloped programs? (Each row should add up to 100%)12Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCPharma: Development of Medical EducationProgramsMax 90%75th Percentile 50%Mean 30.7%Median 35%25th Percentile 0%Min 0%In Company:Max 100%75th Percentile 100%Mean 69.3%Median 65%25th Percentile 50%Min 10%Third-party:
    13. 13. BEST PRACTICES,®LLDownside of Multidisciplinary Education is losingfocus on HCP with biggest impact: physicianWhile a majority of study participants utilize multidisciplinary education, one medicaleducation leader noted that tailoring a program to multiple types of HCPs can cause aprogram to lose focus on the most important participant: the physicians.13Copyright © Best Practices®, LLC“It’s limiting the lens of who is going tohave the greatest impact. One thing thatwe’re looking to do is to transitionsome of the ancillary individuals, suchas maybe nursing or anesthesia orscrub tech, and give them onlinetraining and focus the hands-on eventfor the physician.”– Global Vice President, Education
    14. 14. BEST PRACTICES,®LLMultidisciplinary Programs Projected to GrowA majority of organizations in both the device and pharma segments expect their multi-disciplinary programs to increase in the next 2-3 years. With healthcare reform putting agreater emphasis on health outcomes, some education leaders believe the emphasis oncoordination of care inherent in multi-disciplinary programs is behind the expected growth.Q. What do expect in the next 24-36 months for multidisciplinary education programs supported byyour company:14Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCMultidisciplinary Education Trends:Medical Device: Pharma:(n=13)(n=12)
    15. 15. BEST PRACTICES,®LLDevice Segment: Physicians Value Conferences,Academic Centers for Accredited EducationA majority of device participants felt physicians highly value accredited education programs offered atconferences/congresses and academic centers. However, a previous slide showed that half of the deviceparticipants anticipate reducing conference program support in the coming years – a move likelyassociated with its high cost. Clearly, professional education leaders are going to have to balance valuewith cost in the coming years.Q. Please rate the types of Professional Education that are the most valued by physicians:15Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCMedical Device; MedEd Types That Physicians Most Valuen =1212121212111212
    16. 16. BEST PRACTICES,®LLPharma Segment: Accredited Programs in Varietyof Settings Seen as Highly Valued by PhysiciansThe pharma segment mirrors the device perspective that physicians highly valueaccredited education over non-accredited programs. Likewise, physicians preferacademic centers and conferences as the venues for their programs.Q. Please rate the types of Professional Education that are the most valued by physicians:16Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCPharma; MedEd Types That Physicians Most Valuen =1616161616161616
    17. 17. BEST PRACTICES,®LLDevice Segment: Roundtables, Case Studies AreMost Valuable Information Sources For PhysiciansRoundtable discussions and case studies are highly valuable product information sources for physicians,according to a majority of device participants. This perspective underscores the importance of the peer-to-peer(roundtables) and patient-focused (case studies) education formats for physicians.Q. Please rate the sources of product/therapy information that physicians value the most:17Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCMedical Devices: Most Valued Information Sources:n =121113121212121312121212
    18. 18. BEST PRACTICES,®LLEducation Presented by Peers Considered Most Reliable18Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCThe educator often matters as much as the program content. Physicians value otherprofessionals who have real world experience. Peer-to-peer programs are often ratedhighly reliable. However, the credibility of a program also depends on the event or venuewhere it is presented.“Well I think it’s the peer-to-peerrelationship. So a nurse presenting to anurse or a cardiologist presenting to acardiologist or a general surgeon. I thinkthat has the most credibility. Havingindustry present to these healthcareprofessionals in accredited or a non-accredited event is probably not the mostideal situation.”– Global Vice President, Professional Education,Medical Device Company
    19. 19. BEST PRACTICES,®LLOutcomes & Practice Adoption Rates Are Favored MedDev MetricsMedical Device companies rate four performance metrics for assessing Medical Education valueas highly effective. They include, 1) Improvement Outcomes, 2) Adoption Rates of new Practices,3) Qualitative Feedback, and 4) Post-program Satisfaction Rates. A majority of deviceparticipants gave all these measures highly effective ratings.Q. Please rate the effectiveness of the performance measures/metrics that you employ to show thevalue of your medical education group:19Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCMedical Device: Performance Measurementn =12111212111112
    20. 20. BEST PRACTICES,®LLDevelop a Series of Metrics to Consistently Assess ProgramsOne medical device leader who oversees his organization’s physician training programtouted the use of a rubric of performance measurement metrics as a tool for evaluating theprogram on a quarterly basis. Metrics could include ROI and product usage complaints.20Copyright © Best Practices®, LLC“I decided to develop a rubric for theevaluation of our physician training programand I scheduled a quarterly presentation ofthe compliance committee that looks at a lotof metrics by which we that evaluate therelative success of our program. And myposition, and it’s supported by my corporatecompliance attorneys, is it’s OK to look at ROIfor training - it just can’t be the only thing youlook at.”– Vice President, Clinical AffairsEvaluating Physician TrainingProgram•Develop rubric for evaluating•Use key metrics•Present quarterly
    21. 21. BEST PRACTICES,®LLMedDev Funding Rising for Online, Tablet & Mobile TechnologyQ. Please note whether your funding for different education delivery forms is rising, falling or stayingthe same in the next 24-36 months:21Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCMedical Device:(n= 13 13 12 13 13 13 13 12 12 )On average, half of the device participants expect funding to increase for online and tech-driven education formats such as online, iPad and mobile applications. In a worrisome sign,half also expect funding to decrease for in-class education, which some leaders see as themost effective format for device education and training.
    22. 22. BEST PRACTICES,®LLNew Digital Technologies Permit Greater Flexibility & Lower CostIn the current Medical Education environment, many healthcare facilities need to do moretraining of more staff with less time out of clinic and at lower cost. Consequently, newonline technologies are on the rise while in-class training is on the decline.22Copyright © Best Practices®, LLChttp://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2012/05/14/bisc0514.htm“If we don’t change our ways, we’re going to be left in the dustand here’s why: One is the fact that people can’t take time outof their days to go to these things. They have to be able totrain their entire OR and it’s cost prohibitive to send theirentire OR staff to a course. If you’re from Jersey and thiscourse is in LA, you’re not – you know, that’s -- a week out ofyour [life]. You just can’t do it. If you look at all the data fromthe medical schools right now ,they’ve all gone to iPad orvirtual learning. They still need hands-on opportunity but youcan do that at the local level. They don’t have to leave. We’reconstantly looking at technology to help us in these areas butwithout the funds and the dedicated resources reallyimplemented, it’s a definite struggle.”- Director, Medical Education, Medical Device
    23. 23. BEST PRACTICES,®LLPharma Companies Are Increasing Technology-EnabledFunding Even More Enthusiastically Than MedDevQ. Please note whether your funding for different education delivery forms is rising, falling or stayingthe same in the next 24-36 months:23Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCPharma:(n= 15 15 15 15 14 15 13 12 12 )More than 70% of pharma participants expect funding to increase for online and tech-driveneducation formats such as online, iPad and mobile applications. A majority of the pharmasegment expect funding to remain flat across a host of other education formats:demonstration centers, simulations, games and in-class.
    24. 24. BEST PRACTICES,®LLBest Practices, LLC6350 Quadrangle Drive, Suite 200Chapel Hill, NC 27517www.best-in-class.comAbout Best Practices, LLCBest Practices, LLC is a research and consulting firm that conducts work based on thesimple yet profound principle that organizations can chart a course to superior economicperformance by studying the best business practices, operating tactics, and winningstrategies of world-class companies.24Copyright © Best Practices®, LLCLink for Report: Benchmarking Critical Trends in the Medical Device Marketplace
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