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Immigration Facts: What Every Citizen Needs To Know - 2013
 

Immigration Facts: What Every Citizen Needs To Know - 2013

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AZEIR's popular "Immigration Facts" presentation updated for the Arizona Federal Immigration Reform Debates. All slides are source-cited and clearly viewable. Feel free to use at public meetings or ...

AZEIR's popular "Immigration Facts" presentation updated for the Arizona Federal Immigration Reform Debates. All slides are source-cited and clearly viewable. Feel free to use at public meetings or presentations where a proven source of heavily researched information would be helpful.

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  • Here are a few of those other points that are often used to say immigration is a huge problem, but these numbers and issues themselves have problems. The most significant of which is no unbiased research organization has ever asked these questions of the public. Most of these are based on half-truths and innuendo. <br />
  • http://www.gallup.com/poll/1660/immigration.aspx <br />
  • Fox News Poll conducted by Anderson Robbins Research (D) and Shaw & Company Research (R). Oct. 23-25, 2011 <br />
  • Time Poll conducted by Abt SRBI. June 20-21, 2011. N=1,003 adults nationwide. Margin of error ± 3. - http://www.pollingreport.com/immigration.htm <br />
  • Each cross-references the other’s work to give air of reliability and respectability. However, several groups using faulty interpretation of data still doesn’t mean their conclusions are supported by fact, even if parts of what they say has a hint of fact to them. <br /> In this list, "founded" means a group was founded or co-founded by John Tanton. "Funded" means that U.S. Inc., the funding conduit created and still headed by Tanton, has made grants to the group. <br /> *American Immigration Control FoundationAICF, 1983, funded <br /> *American Patrol/Voice of Citizens Together1992, funded <br /> *California Coalition for Immigration ReformCCIR, 1994, funded <br /> Californians for Population Stabilization1996, funded (founded separately in 1986) <br /> Center for Immigration StudiesCIS, 1985, founded and funded <br /> *Federation for American Immigration ReformFAIR, 1979, founded and funded <br /> NumbersUSA1996, founded and funded <br /> Population-Environment Balance1973, joined board in 1980 <br /> Pro English1994, founded and funded <br /> ProjectUSA1999, funded <br /> *The Social Contract Press1990, founded and funded <br /> U.S. English1983, founded and funded <br /> U.S. Inc.1982, founded and funded <br /> If someone you know only shows you “data” they found on blogs, fake news sites, or one-sided groups, start asking for proof. If they don’t give it to you, that should tell you something. <br /> Examples <br /> http://www.capsweb.org/content.php?id=32&menu_id=7&menu_item_id=25 <br />
  • Unlike privately-funded organizations with axes to grind, colleges and universities are the best sources for unbiased research that can stand up to scrutiny. Why? Because in the academic world, you can lose your job if you make things up or publish things that are not true. Private, anti-immigration or anti-anything organizations don’t fire people who make things up that aren’t true. They encourage stretching conclusions so long as it helps make their points. <br />
  • Does anyone watch lawyer shows on TV? What do they say in the courtroom when they swear someone in as a witness? They swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. The DON’T swear to tell the truth, most of the truth or half of the truth. <br />
  • http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-1.pdf <br />
  • http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-1.pdf <br />
  • http://www.nclr.org/index.php/about_us/faqs/the_truth_about_nclr/the_translation_of_our_name/ <br />
  • Why civil? There is no jail time. <br /> Section 1325. Improper entry by alien <br /> (a) Improper time or place; avoidance of examination or inspection; misrepresentation and concealment of facts. Any alien who (1) enters or attempts to enter the United States at any time or place other than as designated by immigration officers, or (2) eludes examination or inspection by immigration officers, or (3) attempts to enter or obtains entry to the United States by a willfully false or misleading representation or the willful concealment of a material fact, shall, for the first commission of any such offense, be fined under title 18 or imprisoned not more than 6 months, or both, and, for a subsequent commission of any such offense, be fined under title 18, or imprisoned not more than 2 years, or both. <br /> (b) Improper time or place; civil penalties <br /> Any alien who is apprehended while entering (or attempting to enter) the United States at a time or place other than as designated by immigration officers shall be subject to a civil penalty of - <br /> (1) at least $50 and not more than $250 for each such entry (or attempted entry); or <br /> (2) twice the amount specified in paragraph (1) in the case of an alien who has been previously subject to a civil penalty under this subsection. <br />
  • Section 1325. Improper entry by alien <br /> (b) Improper time or place; civil penalties <br /> Any alien who is apprehended while entering (or attempting to enter) the United States at a time or place other than as designated by immigration officers shall be subject to a civil penalty of - <br /> (1) at least $50 and not more than $250 for each such entry (or attempted entry); or <br /> (2) twice the amount specified in paragraph (1) in the case of an alien who has been previously subject to a civil penalty under this subsection. <br />
  • Section 1325. Improper entry by alien <br /> (a) Improper time or place; avoidance of examination or inspection; misrepresentation and concealment of facts Any alien who (1) enters or attempts to enter the United States at any time or place other than as designated by immigration officers, or (2) eludes examination or inspection by immigration officers, or (3) attempts to enter or obtains entry to the United States by a willfully false or misleading representation or the willful concealment of a material fact, shall, for the first commission of any such offense, be fined under title 18 or imprisoned not more than 6 months, or both, and, for a subsequent commission of any such offense, be fined under title 18, or imprisoned not more than 2 years, or both. <br />
  • http://www.travel.state.gov/visa/bulletin/bulletin_5424.html 1992 for 2011 <br /> http://www.travel.state.gov/visa/bulletin/bulletin_5424.html 1993 for 2013 <br />
  • Between 1965 and 1985, 85% of undocumented entries from Mexico were offset by departures. <br /> Changes in U.S. law since 1986 have discouraged their return home. <br /> Massey, Douglas S. and Audrey Singer, 1995. “New Estimates of Undocumented Mexican Migration and the Probability of Apprehension,” Demography, 32: 203-213. <br />
  • There are many reasons for this: <br /> 1. ICE delays <br /> 2. Not planning on staying much longer <br /> 3. simply willing to take the risk <br /> Most immigrants cross the border legally at normal checkpoints and inspected by border control officials as the law prescribes <br />
  • Source: http://www.pewhispanic.org/files/reports/133.pdf <br />
  • Source: Department of Homeland Security http://uscis.gov/graphics/shared/statistics/index.htm <br />
  • No citizen under the age of 21 can sponsor an alien citizen into the U.S. <br /> Any alien who has been in the U.S. Illegally must wait 10 years out of country before applying. <br /> The typical family wait is seven years, so 21 years plus ten year penalty plus seven year processing equals 38 years. <br />
  • EXAMPLE #1: The Birthright Fallacy <br /> 1. Bringing in a Spouse, of a US citizen: This is the fastest possible way to become a U.S. citizen - 3 years <br /> 2. Bringing in minor child or parent: This process depends on whether the child is a minor or not, single or married. Minor children can file for green cards immediately, but cannot apply for citizenship status for an additional five years. <br /> 3. Single or adult children and siblings can apply immediately, but the wait times depend on the country of origin and annual limits set by Congress. Typically, the wait is 11-22 years. <br /> No U.S. citizen can "sponsor" someone to become a U.S. Citizen until they reach the age of 21. The suggestion that U.S. children of undocumented parents can somehow speed up their parent&apos;s entry into the country legally is without merit. The shortest amount of time it would take would be 38 years, but likely never. For siblings, it&apos;s even worse, taking up to 53 years. <br />
  • The truth is the growth in the Hispanic population has grown by 22.6M people (6%) over the 17 years shown above. Total population of the U.S. has grown by 52.1M (18%). Contrary to what you hear in the media, according to the U.S. Census Bureau (who are the only people who count these things), people of Hispanic origin made up 43% of the total population growth over the last 17 years. That may sound like a lot, but it isn’t when you look at the annual change as shown in this chart. <br />
  • So why do they come here? To work and be reunited with family. That’s the way the laws are written now. <br /> They don’t come here to suck up welfare. <br /> They don’t come here to commit crime. <br /> They come here to work. <br /> Massey, 2006 - Cato <br />
  • A 2006 study by Arizona State University who looked at arrest data from Maricopa County estimates that only 4.4 percent of all crimes were committed by undocumented immigrants <br />
  • DHS reports in 2004, of the 384,954 individuals apprehended in AZ, 13,403 were “criminal aliens,” meaning 3.5% were convicted of crimes <br /> http://www.dhs.gov/xnews/releases/press_release_0646.shtm <br />
  • MCSO claims 75,000 arrests every 6 months. Their website reports 1,600 arrests of undocumented aliens. This means, according to their own numbers, undocumented immigrants account for 2.1% of all arrests made by the MCSO <br />
  • The Arizona Republic recently reported (Migrant rate of crime even with numbers,” Michael Kiefer, The Arizona Republic Feb. 25, 2008) that the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office places ICE “holds” on 10% of those in their custody. An ICE hold means the prisoner is being held until ICE can determine <br /> the nationality of the arrestee. <br /> You should also know that there have been many reports of U.S. citizens being kept in jails because of ICE “holds.” This means that the MCSO is treating legitimate U.S. citizens as if they were here illegally. <br /> Why do we hear about most crimes being committed by undocumented immigrants? It helps instill fear and justifies extreme positions <br /> How exciting would the news be if you heard this on the local news: 145 white people were arrested today. 7 charged with murder, 59 robbery, 13 spousal abuse, 41 on drug-related charges and 10 on other minor infractions. <br /> Opponents use multi-year studies to come up with a large number that is intended to startle people: <br /> 1. 960,000 sex crimes committed over 8 years becomes “The Dark Side of Illegal Immigration: Nearly One Million Sex Crimes Committed by Illegal Immigrants in the United States” http://www.familysecuritymatters.org/homeland.php?id=1386104, which means there must be 130,000 per year. What they don’t tell you is in 1999, there was only 92,000 total sex crimes committed in the U.S. http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/factsheet/childsexabuse.htm. Therefore, illegal immigrants were responsible for 141% of all sex crimes in 1999. <br /> CIS Data: http://www.dhs.gov/xnews/releases/press_release_0646.shtm <br />
  • This is also referred to in the IPC Immigration Fact Check titled “Immigrants and Crime, Are They Connected?” Dec. 2007 <br />
  • This is also referred to in the IPC Immigration Fact Check titled “Immigrants and Crime, Are They Connected?” Dec. 2007 <br />
  • When taken as a whole, FBI statistics plainly show that the murder rates are going down at the same time organizations like CIS say immigration is increasing. But a quick look at this chart shows that the numbers are generally moving in opposite directions. <br /> Clearly, murders committed by undocumented aliens is a non-issue. <br /> http://novicebear.blogspot.com/2008/01/arizona-rep-russell-k-pearce-responds.html <br />
  • Harvard and CUNY studies show immigrants are 45% less likely to commit crimes than third generation immigrants. Why? Because committing crimes draws attention to themselves, which will get them deported. <br /> Robert J. Sampson,PhD,Jeffrey D. Morenoff,PhD,and Stephen Raudenbush,EdD <br />
  • In California, the state with the greatest number of both undocumented and legal immigrants, the incarceration rate for native-born men age 18-39 (4.5%) was more than 11 times the rate for immigrants (0.4%). <br /> http://www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp?i=776 <br />
  • In California, the state with the greatest number of both undocumented and legal immigrants, the incarceration rate for native-born men age 18-39 (4.5%) was more than 11 times the rate for immigrants (0.4%). <br /> http://www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp?i=776 <br />
  • Noncitizen men from Mexico ages 18-40 – a group disproportionately likely to have entered the United States illegally – are more than 8 times less likely than U.S.-born men in the same age group to be in a correctional setting (0.48% vs. 4.2%). <br /> http://www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp?i=776 <br />
  • According to a 2007 study by University of California, Irvine, sociologist Rubén G. Rumbaut, among men age 18-39 (who comprise the vast majority of the U.S. prison population), the incarceration rate for the native-born (3.5 percent) was five times higher than the rate for immigrants (0.7 percent) in 2000. <br /> The study also found that incarceration rates were lower for immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala—who account for the majority of undocumented immigrants. In 2000, only 0.7 percent of foreign-born Mexican men and 0.5 percent of foreign-born Salvadoran and Guatemalan men were in prison. <br /> Florida International University studies show areas with historically high levels of immigration have lower levels of crime. <br /> 1. Harvard - Sampson study <br /> 2. Federal Reserve Bank - Anne M. Piehl, 2005 & 2006 <br /> 3. Florida International University – Martinez, 2006 <br />
  • This percentage is up .5% from February 2010 <br /> http://www.bop.gov/news/quick.jsp#2 <br />
  • http://www.bop.gov/news/quick.jsp#2 <br />
  • http://2010.census.gov/2010census/data/ <br />
  • Testimony was given in Arizona Senate committee hearings and on the floor of the Senate that criminal aliens make up 33% of those held in Arizona prisons and that SB1070 was responsible for a decline of “500 alien prisoners” The actual number of prisoners is 13.8%--less than half of what we’re asked to believe. If 150,00 undocumented and their families have left Arizona has resulted in a 1.1% drop in the criminal alien prison population, what does that say about their contribution to crime in the first place? <br />
  • EXAMPLE #4 continued: How exaggerating data distorts public perceptions of the problem. <br /> Crime statistics claims don’t match up with reality. <br /> Federal Prison data: http://www.bop.gov/news/quick.jsp#2 <br /> AZ Prison data: http://www.azcorrections.gov/adc/reports/Zoya_ethnic.aspx <br /> Violent crime data: http://www.azdps.gov/About/Reports/Crime_In_Arizona/ <br /> Hate crime data: http://www2.fbi.gov/ucr/hc2009/index.html <br /> ID Theft data: http://www.adc.state.az.us/BudgetHearings2012.pdf <br />
  • Testimony was given in Arizona Senate committee hearings and on the floor of the Senate that criminal aliens make up 33% of those held in Arizona prisons and that SB1070 was responsible for a decline of “500 alien prisoners” The actual number of prisoners is 13.8%--less than half of what we’re asked to believe. If 150,00 undocumented and their families have left Arizona has resulted in a 1.1% drop in the criminal alien prison population, what does that say about their contribution to crime in the first place? <br />
  • Testimony was given in Arizona Senate committee hearings and on the floor of the Senate that criminal aliens make up 33% of those held in Arizona prisons and that SB1070 was responsible for a decline of “500 alien prisoners” The actual number of prisoners is 13.8%--less than half of what we’re asked to believe. If 150,00 undocumented and their families have left Arizona has resulted in a 1.1% drop in the criminal alien prison population, what does that say about their contribution to crime in the first place? <br />
  • Anti-immigration groups misuse data that indicate the number of crossings to predict how many undocumented aliens are in the U.S. The numbers they use are those published by the Dept. of Homeland Security that show how many people have been apprehended and sent back over the border. What they don’t tell you is these numbers do NOT indicate unique individuals crossing the border. In most instances, they are the same people attempting to cross again and again. Even the Dept. of Homeland Security’s own reports make this qualification of their data. If they know the numbers are not individuals, how can anyone conclude they are indeed individuals? <br /> Bottom line is a quote from Princeton professor and expert on Mexican immigration Dr. Douglas Massey <br />
  • There is no evidence that undocumented workers are taking “good jobs” from Americans. <br /> These next few slides show why that is. <br />
  • http://www.pewhispanic.org/files/2013/05/2013-04_Demographic-Portrait-of-Mexicans-in-the-US.pdf <br />
  • http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/forbrn.pdf <br />
  • http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/forbrn.pdf <br />
  • http://www.ica.state.az.us/Labor/Labor_MinWag_main.aspx <br />
  • This wage rate refutes the claim undocumented workers depress wages. In fact, the AWER was put into place to effectively eliminate any downward pressure on farmworker wages from the use of any undocumented workers. <br /> http://www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/adverse.cfm <br />   <br /> Adverse effect wage rates are the minimum wage rates which the Department of Labor has determined must be offered and paid to U.S. and foreign workers by employers of nonimmigrant foreign agricultural workers (H2-A visa holders). Such employers must pay the higher of the AEWR, the applicable prevailing wage, or the statutory minimum wage as specified in the Code of Federal Regulations. Historical Time Series of Adverse Effects Wage Rate <br />
  • http://www.justice.gov/ust/eo/bapcpa/20111101/bci_data/median_income_table.htm <br /> There is no evidence that undocumented workers are taking “good jobs” from Americans. These next few slides show what the facts really are. <br /> What most people who oppose immigration fail to accept is the simple fact that our population is aging and we are have fewer numbers of children. Research shows our birthrate is barely at “replacement” level. <br /> As a result, there has been for several years now, and in to the foreseeable future, an insufficient number of births necessary to maintain our worker base. This is why undocumented workers can come to the U.S. and fit into jobs without affecting the unemployment rate. <br />
  • http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/H-1B/h1b-fy-12-characteristics.pdf <br />
  • http://pewhispanic.org/files/reports/107.pdf <br />
  • Bean, Frank D., and Gillian Stevens, 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation. p. 6. <br /> Based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. <br />
  • Bean, Frank D., and Gillian Stevens, 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation. p. 6. <br /> Based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. <br />
  • This table shows the percentage of undocumented workers employed in one of six job sectors compared to the number of native-born and naturalized workers. As you can see, as the jobs get lower pay, the more you may have an undocumented worker filling those positions. Whereas, as the pay increases, you will see that more native-born workers are filling those jobs. <br /> http://www.census.gov/prod/2009pubs/acs-10.pdf <br /> http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/foreign/reports.html <br />
  • The annual limit is calculated as 480,000 minus the number of aliens who were issued visas or who adjusted to LPR status in the previous fiscal year as 1) immediate relatives of U.S. citizens, 2) children born subsequent to the issuance of a visa to an accompanying parent, and 3) children born abroad to lawful permanent residents on temporary trips abroad minus 4) certain categories of aliens paroled into the United States in the second preceding fiscal year plus 5) unused employment preferences in the preceding year. <br />
  • http://www.nass.usda.gov/Charts_and_Maps/Farm_Labor/fl_allwg.asp <br />
  • http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=138b6138f898d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCRD&vgnextchannel=91919c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1RCRD <br />
  • http://www.travel.state.gov/pdf/FY12AnnualReport-TableIII.pdf <br />
  • “It should by no means be assumed that once an applicant is registered, the case is then continually included in the waiting totals unless and until a visa is issued. “ <br /> 1,375,294 - 2012 <br /> 1,316, 118 - 2013 <br />
  • Of the over two dozen studies we looked at for this presentation, only ONE came to the opposite conclusion, and that report is the one Maricopa County Attorney Andy Thomas paid over $200,000 for. It is an almost universal conclusion that undocumented workers do NOT impact “everyone” ability to find employment. If anything, they increase the need for employment in other sectors because not only are they collecting incomes, they are also vociferous consumers. <br />
  • And here are couple of reasons why: <br />
  • This is the total of all payments made into the economy and all of those expenses taken out. That includes fees from permits, licenses and taxes. <br />
  • 2009: http://www.retirement.gov/finance/2009/Full%20FY%202009%20PAR.pdf - 2007 = $836B <br /> 2011: http://www.ssa.gov/finance/2011/Full%20FY%202011%20PAR.pdf - 2008 = $921B <br /> 2012: http://www.ssa.gov/finance/2012/Full%20FY%202012%20PAR.pdf - 2009 = $993B <br />
  • http://www.retirement.gov/finance/2009/Full%20FY%202009%20PAR.pdf <br />
  • http://www.ssa.gov/finance/2007/Auditors_Reports.pdf <br />
  • This number is also confirmed in the Oklahoma Bank study, which says if 50,000 immigrants leave the state, it will lose $1.8B in productivity and wages. <br />
  • http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2011/03/rising_tide.html <br />
  • More and more studies are being published that show undocumented workers contribute equal amounts if not more into the economy than they take out. Each of the studies listed here support the notion that undocumented workers and their families provide significant purchasing power into our state’s economy. The fact that state and local governments are suffering from declining revenues cannot totally be attributable to the downturn in the housing market. Telling 10-14% of the workforce who all purchase goods and services that drives our economy to leave is a significant factor. <br /> U of A study shows undocumented workers contribute over $780M per year in sales taxes. <br /> Texas Comptroller estimates undocumented aliens contribute a net GAIN to the Texas economy of $424.7M per year. <br />
  • There are no studies that looking over time support the notion that people moving here do not learn the language or the culture. Anecdotal comments like “they only speak Spanish” are use a lot to justify non-assimilation. However, just the speaking of Spanish in public does not mean they can’t or don’t know English. In fact, undocumented families and their children assimilate just as quickly as any other immigrant group throughout our history. <br /> #4 University of Florida, “Facts about Immigration,” pg 63. <br />
  • The U.S.’s peak years of immigration occurred at toward the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th Centuries. <br />
  • 2008: http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2011/tables/11s0038.pdf - 12.5% <br /> 2009: http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0038.pdf - 12.5% <br /> 2010: <br />
  • http://www.aila.org/Content/default.aspx?docid=17242 (Source: Simon Romero and Janet Elder, “Hispanics in the US Report Optimism” New York Times, (Aug. 6, 2003)). <br /> CIS Office of Citizenship 2004 Naturalization Report M-646.pdf <br />
  • http://www.aila.org/Content/default.aspx?docid=17242 <br />
  • Gregory Rodriguez, “From Newcomers to New Americans: The Successful Integration of Immigrants Into American Society,” Washington, D.C., National Immigration Forum, 1999, p. 18. <br />
  • Richard Alba and Victor Nee, in “Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration” (Harvard; $39.95), report that in 1990 more than ninety-five per cent of Mexican-Americans between the ages of twenty-five and forty-four who were born in the United States could speak English well. They conclude that although Hispanic-Americans, particularly those who live close to the border, may continue to speak their original language (usually along with English) a generation longer than other groups have tended to do, “by any standard, linguistic assimilation is widespread.” <br />
  • http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=w_O_Mll1h38C&oi=fnd&pg=PR11&dq=America%E2%80%99s+Newcomers+and+the+Dynamics+of+Diversity&ots=48vVsdGoP8&sig=zt0KTqUI_vpYo0ApqduRd18eQ58#v=snippet&q=speak%20language%20other%20than%20english&f=false <br />
  • 2011: http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/ois_natz_fr_2012.pdf - 757,434 <br /> 2010: http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/natz_fr_2010.pdf - 619,913 <br /> 2009: http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/natz_fr_2009.pdf - 743,715 <br />
  • We need to ask if this is a genuine concern or a talking point. We should ask ourselves why so many Americans flock to our cities’ “Little Italy” and “Chinatown” neighborhoods, where the languages and cultures of the “old countries” are still spoken in businesses, on advertisements and in the media, while simultaneously resenting hearing Spanish. (Source:  American Immigration Lawyers Association, “Myths & Facts in the Immigration Debate”, 8/14/03. <br /> http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/natz_fr_2009.pdf <br /> Slide data source: DHS-Natz_Mexico_cy_00_03.pdf <br />
  • http://www.aila.org/Content/default.aspx?docid=17242 (Source: Simon Romero and Janet Elder, “Hispanics in the US Report Optimism” New York Times, (Aug. 6, 2003)). <br /> CIS Office of Citizenship 2004 Naturalization Report M-646.pdf <br />
  • This study shows that English language learning is tied directly to education. The higher the level of education attained, the more likely English is to become their primary language. <br /> In short, if you want to DISCOURAGE assimilation, you keep them out of school. <br />
  • AILF Policy Report, “U.S. Soldiers from Around the World: Immigrants Fight for an Adopted Homeland” (updated Mar. 2003). Over 746 immigrants have received the Medal of Honor. <br />
  • 2009 - 57% <br />
  • This means that only 25% of those immigrants in the U.S. are here without legal status. <br />
  • Since 1986, laws have been passed making it illegal to provide non-citizens with any federal or state welfare or other public assistance. Therefore undocumented immigrants are ineligible for programs like welfare, food stamps, and Medicaid, etc <br /> This number consists of legal immigrants with legal status. <br />
  • As the Congressional Research Service points out in a 2007 report, undocumented immigrants, who comprise nearly one-third of all immigrants in the country, are not eligible to receive public “welfare” benefits—ever. Legal permanent residents (LPRs) must pay into the Social Security and Medicare systems for approximately 10 years before they are eligible to receive benefits when they retire. <br /> In most cases, LPRs can not receive SSI, which is available only to U.S. citizens, and are not eligible for means-tested public benefits until 5 years after receiving their green cards. <br />
  • http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr007.pdf <br />
  • http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr007.pdf <br />
  • http://chir.asu.edu/sites/default/files/pdfs_1/publication_28.pdf <br /> 2008 = 28% <br /> 2012 = 19.5% <br />
  • http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/167/21/2354 <br />
  • http://www.ajph.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/7/1322 <br />
  • http://www.rand.org/news/press.06/11.14.html <br />
  • The greatest threat to Democracy is having a public that thinks it is fully informed, but really isn’t very well informed at all. Too often in this digital age, we jump right to the debate without having the facts. We need good, quality journalism so we the citizens of the United States, who live in a very complex world are able to say “These are the facts. I know what the facts are and I’m going to make my decision as an informed citizen.” <br /> Three things you need to know about this presentation <br /> Party and ideology have nothing to do with this presentation. It’s only intent is to present facts. <br /> It’s purpose is to challenge false beliefs and preconceived notions. <br /> The information presented herein are based on verifiable public data obtained from recognized sources with sources listed at the bottom of each slide. <br />
  • EXAMPLE #4: How exaggerating data distorts public perceptions of the problem. <br /> This table highlights some of the more egregious falsehoods told on a daily basis about immigrants in Arizona. The data for Texas is similar, but all highlight the problems of rhetoric of "hot air." <br /> Prison population data: http://www.azcorrections.gov/adc/reports/Zoya_ethnic.aspx <br /> Education costs data: Estimates based on larger estimate of http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/statistics/publications/ois_ill_pe_2010.pdf or http://www.migrationinformation.org/DataHub/charts/MPIDataHub-Children-in-immigrant-families.xls (12.2% or 61,507 undocumented population &lt;=17 yrs x $6,170 = $379,498,190) <br /> Health care costs data: Illegal Immigration: Perceptions and Realities, ASU Morrison Inst. <br /> Tax Payments data: “A Rising Tide or a Shrinking Pie,” CAP, http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/special-reports/rising-tide-or-shrinking-pie <br />
  • SB1070 has had a brutal impact on Arizona’s economy already, but what would happen if all aspects of SB1070 were passed into law? <br /> Suffice it to say, the economic and jobs damage would be enormous. If SB1070 is fully implemented, the impacts on Arizona’s economy would be worse than during the last recession by doubling the numbers of lost jobs (275,000 to 581,000) and reducing Gross State Product by $48.8B and tax revenues by $4.2B. <br /> There has to be a better way and there are better ways. What’s important is that you hear about them. <br /> Source: http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2011/03/rising_tide.html <br />
  • There are also outrageous claims of undocumented workers bringing diseases into the U.S. A recent example of this could be heard on CNN’s Lou Dobb’s show, which made the claim stated here. Even after it was pointed out that this claim is untrue, Dobbs has yet to issue any correction of any kind. <br /> Demonization of groups who oppose those who are working for a workable and comprehensive immigration reform package is a common strategy. One target is the National Council of LaRaza, which is a 40-year-old group whose purpose is improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. Groups such as FAIR, CIS, the Minutemen and others have attempted to paint NCLR as a racist organization by claiming “LaRaza” means “race.” It doesn’t. <br /> 1. National Hansen’s Disease Program <br /> 2. http://www.nclr.org/content/viewpoints/detail/42500/ <br />
  • By the way, Joe Turner is now a paid field organizer for the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) <br /> Maricopa County Director of Elections Karen Osborne said “No non-citizen has ever attempted to vote in Maricopa County.” <br /> Three sources: “About NASCO,” North America’s SuperCorridor Organization. Available at http://www.splcenter.org/intel/ <br /> intelreport/article.jsp?pid=978. <br /> “Myth vs. Fact,” NASCO. Available at http://www.nascocorridor.com/admin/images/docs/NASCO%20CONGRESSIONAL%20-%20Myth%20vs%20%20Fact%20December%202007.pdf. <br /> Philip Dine, “Urban Legend of North American Union Feeds Fears,” Seattle Times, May 19, 2007. Available at http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2003713518_rumor19.html. <br />
  • The greatest threat to Democracy is having a public that thinks it is fully informed, but really isn’t very well informed at all. Too often in this digital age, we jump right to the debate without having the facts. We need good, quality journalism so we the citizens of the United States, who live in a very complex world are able to say “These are the facts. I know what the facts are and I’m going to make my decision as an informed citizen.” <br /> Three things you need to know about this presentation <br /> Party and ideology have nothing to do with this presentation. It’s only intent is to present facts. <br /> It’s purpose is to challenge false beliefs and preconceived notions. <br /> The information presented herein are based on verifiable public data obtained from recognized sources with sources listed at the bottom of each slide. <br />
  • Deuteronomy 24:14-19 (New American Standard Bible)  <br /> 14"You shall not oppress a hired servant who is poor and needy, whether he is one of your countrymen or one of your aliens who is in your land in your towns. <br />  15"You shall give him his wages on his day before the sun sets, for he is poor and sets his heart on it; so that he will not cry against you to the LORD and it become sin in you. <br />  16"Fathers shall not be put to death for their sons, nor shall sons be put to death for their fathers; everyone shall be put to death for his own sin. <br />  17"You shall not pervert the justice due an alien or an orphan, nor take a widow&apos;s garment in pledge. <br />  18"But you shall remember that you were a slave in Egypt, and that the LORD your God redeemed you from there; therefore I am commanding you to do this thing. <br />  19"When you reap your harvest in your field and have forgotten a sheaf in the field, you shall not go back to get it; it shall be for the alien, for the orphan, and for the widow, in order that the LORD your God may bless you in all the work of your hands. <br /> Jeremiah 22 <br /> Warning of Jerusalem&apos;s Fall <br />  1Thus says the LORD, "Go down to the house of the king of Judah, and there speak this word <br />  2and say, &apos;Hear the word of the LORD, O king of Judah, who sits on David&apos;s throne, you and your servants and your people who enter these gates. <br />  3&apos;Thus says the LORD, "Do justice and righteousness, and deliver the one who has been robbed from the power of his oppressor Also do not mistreat or do violence to the stranger, the orphan, or the widow; and do not shed innocent blood in this place. <br />  4"For if you men will indeed perform this thing, then kings will enter the gates of this house, sitting in David&apos;s place on his throne, riding in chariots and on horses, even the king himself and his servants and his people. <br />  5" But if you will not obey these words, I swear by Myself," declares the LORD, "that this house will become a desolation."&apos; <br /> Malachi 3:5 <br />  5"Then I will draw near to you for judgment; and I will be a swift witness against the sorcerers and against the adulterers and against those who swear falsely, and against those who oppress the wage earner in his wages, the widow and the orphan, and those who turn aside the alien and do not fear Me," says the LORD of hosts. <br /> Luke 16:19-31 (New American Standard Bible) <br /> The Rich Man and Lazarus <br />  19"Now there was a rich man, and he habitually dressed in purple and fine linen, joyously living in splendor every day. <br />  20"And a poor man named Lazarus (A)was laid at his gate, covered with sores, <br />  21and longing to be fed with the crumbs which were falling from the rich man&apos;s table; besides, even the dogs were coming and licking his sores. <br />  22"Now the poor man died and was carried away by the angels to Abraham&apos;s bosom; and the rich man also died and was buried. <br />  23"In Hades he lifted up his eyes, being in torment, and saw Abraham far away and Lazarus in his bosom. <br />  24"And he cried out and said, ‘Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus so that he may dip the tip of his finger in water and cool off my tongue, for I am in agony in this flame.&apos; <br />  25"But Abraham said, &apos;Child, remember that (F)during your life you received your good things, and likewise Lazarus bad things; but now he is being comforted here, and you are in agony. <br />  26&apos;And besides all this, between us and you there is a great chasm fixed, so that those who wish to come over from here to you will not be able, and that none may cross over from there to us.&apos; <br />  27"And he said, &apos;Then I beg you, father, that you send him to my father&apos;s house-- <br />  28for I have five brothers--in order that he may warn them, so that they will not also come to this place of torment.&apos; <br />  29"But Abraham said, &apos;They have Moses and the Prophets; let them hear them.&apos; <br />  30"But he said, &apos;No, father Abraham, but if someone goes to them from the dead, they will repent!&apos; <br />  31"But he said to him, &apos;If they do not listen to Moses and the Prophets, they will not be persuaded even if someone rises from the dead.&apos;" <br />
  • While most of what we hear in the press is negative, most Arizonans hold more moderate views on immigration and do not support the hard “enforcement-at-any-cost” positions of many of our state’s politicians. <br /> The bottom line is Arizonans are much more interested in meaningful changes in immigration policy than in throwing 12M people out of the country. These numbers plainly indicate that those people who argue only for “tough enforcement,” although loud in their views, are in the minority. <br /> #1 27% agree, 9% don’t know <br /> #2 24% disagree, 10% don’t know <br /> #3 16% disagree, 8% don’t know <br /> #4 13% disagree, 4% don’t know <br />
  • This presentation is the work of an array of groups who are interested in you knowing the facts without the color of bias or politics. <br />

Immigration Facts: What Every Citizen Needs To Know - 2013 Immigration Facts: What Every Citizen Needs To Know - 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • Immigration Facts What Every Citizen Needs to Know © 2008-2013 Arizona Employers for Immigration Reform, All Rights Reserved 1
  • “A salient characteristic of the current debate on U.S. immigration policy is the high ratio of hot air to data.” Dr. Douglas Massey Co-director, Mexican Migration Project Princeton University Source: “Crossing The Border, What We Learned From The Mexican Migration Project,” Durand, Jorge and Douglas S. Massey, p. 1. 3
  • Immigration Quiz: True or False? Increase amount of crime Take jobs from Americans Don’t pay any taxes Strain health care & education systems Increase terrorism threat 4
  • Immigration Quiz: True or False? Won’t enter legally Don’t assimilate, learn English, respect culture No Constitutional Rights Come here to vote illegally Threaten our sovereignty 5
  • What people believe 6
  • 67% Believe they won’t assimilate or learn English Source: Zogby American Poll, April 2006 7
  • 52% Believe they strain health care, education and social services Source: Pew Hispanic Center, The State of American Public Opinion on Immigration in Spring 2006 8
  • 49% Believe they don’t pay taxes Source: Benson Strategy Group, Immigration Opinions Poll, May 9-12, 2009 9
  • 48% Believe they threaten our sovereignty Source: Pew Hispanic Center 2006 Immigration Survey, February 8-March 7, 2006 10
  • 39% Believe they increase the crime rate Source: FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll, 6 April 06 11
  • 35% Believe they take jobs from Americans Source: Time Magazine Poll, March, 29-30, 2006 12
  • 31% Believe they increase the threat of terrorism Source: Opinion Dynamics Fox News Poll, April 25-26, 2006 13
  • 20% Believe they won’t enter the country legally Source: Benson Strategy Group, Immigration Opinions Poll, May 9-12, 2009 14
  • 66% Believe immigration is a “good” thing for the U.S. Source: Gallup Poll, June 7-10, 2012 15
  • 63% Believe illegal immigrants who have lived in the U.S. since they were children should be eligible for legal citizenship Source: Fox News Poll, Oct. 23-25, 2011 16
  • 62% Believe the 14th Amendment should not be revised or reinterpreted Source: Time Poll, June 20-21, 2011 17
  • “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth gets its boots on.” Charles Haddon Spurgeon 19th Century Minister 20
  • Checking The Facts 21
  • PolitiFact Immigration Checks Pants On Fire FALSE Mostly False Half True Mostly True TRUE 19 56 33 41 31 23 9.4% 27.6% 16.3% 20.25 15.3% 11.3% Wrong 88.7% Source: PolitiFact.com immigration topic, updated 7/06/12. N = 203 11.3% 22
  • AZ FactCheck: Immigration FALSE Mostly False Somewhat False Somewhat True Mostly True TRUE 29 4 8 4 4 59.2% 8.2% 16.3% 8.2% 8.2% Wrong 91.8% 8.2% Source: Arizona Republic, AZ Fact Check immigration topic, updated 7/08/12. N = 49 23
  • Race 24
  • White U.S. Census Bureau racial classification for all Hispanics who are not clearly Black, American Indian or Asian Source: Census 2000 Brief, "Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin." 25
  • Ethnicity What the term “Hispanic” really refers to in the U.S. Census Bureau classification system Source: Census 2000 Brief, "Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin." 26
  • “The People” What the proper translation of the word “La Raza” means in context Source: The Translation of Our Name: National Council of La Raza 27
  • Legality 28
  • Civil The type of offense for entering the U.S. at an “improper time or place” Source: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 29
  • $50-$250 The penalty for entering the U.S. at an “improper time or place” Source: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 (b) 30
  • False Papers Point at which improper entry becomes a criminal offense Source: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 (a)(3) 31
  • AZ, GA, AL States in which being in the country without papers is a Felony 32
  • 1993 The year Mexican immigrants would have had to apply for entry visas in order to receive them in 2013 Source: Visa Bulletin No. 63, Vol. IX. U.S. Department of State, December 2013. 33
  • 85% Percentage of undocumented entries from Mexico offset by departures between 1965 and 1985 Source: Massey & Singer, New Estimates of Undocumented Mexican Migration and the Probability of Apprehension, 1995 34
  • 45% Percentage of undocumented immigrants who overstayed a legal visa in 2006 Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Modes of Entry for the Unauthorized Migrant Population, May 2006 35
  • 25% Percent of in-country overstay leads deemed credible and forwarded to ICE for investigation in 2008 Source: DHS, “Department of Homeland Security Annual Performance Report Fiscal Years 2008 - 2010,” p. 31. 36
  • 150,000 Average number of unauthorized immigrants from Mexico arriving annually March 2007 to March 2009 Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010, p. 10. 37
  • 3% Percentage of total U.S. population estimated to be undocumented Source: Dept. of Homeland Security, Center for Immigration Statistics 38
  • 10 Years a naturalized citizen from Mexico may have to wait to bring their spouse into the U.S. Source: American Immigration Lawyers Association, AILA Backgrounder: Myths and Facts in the Immigration Debate 39
  • 38 Years the undocumented parents of a U.S. citizen will have to wait to legally become U.S. citizens Source: Calculations based on existing U.S. Law and historical immigration processing times. 40
  • Birthright Fallacy Penalty Penalty Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 41 Wait Wait 38 years 53 years
  • Population Growth 19902012 9% 10.6% 11.2% 9.5% 10% 16.9% 15.8%16.3% 16.7% 14.8% 15% 15.4% 13% 14.1% 12.5% Source: U.S. Census Bureau, State & County QuickFacts, 2011 42
  • Crime 44
  • 4.4% Estimate of all Arizona crimes committed by undocumented immigrants Source: ASU Incarceration Study, 2006 45
  • 3.48% Percent of all undocumented immigrants DHS deported from Arizona with prior criminal records Source: DHS, Fact Sheet: Arizona Border Control Initiative – Phase II, March 30, 2005 46
  • 2.1% Percent of MCSO arrests of undocumented immigrants as percent of total arrests Source: MCSO web site and press releases 47
  • 10% Percent of all people booked into MCSO jails subject to an ICE “hold” Source: M. Kiefer, Arizona Republic, Feb. 25, 2008 48
  • 52.5% Percent drop in violent crime as undocumented population grew between 1994-2006 Source: U.S. DoJ, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Key Facts At A Glance, March 29, 2010 49
  • 48.6% Percent drop in property crime as undocumented population grew between 1994-2006 Source: U.S. DoJ, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Key Facts At A Glance, March 29, 2010 50
  • What is the truth? Although the undocumented population has grown by an estimated 1,400 people per day, the murder rate declined from 61 per day in 1996 to 47 per day in 2006. Total murders per day have declined while the number of undocumented aliens entering the country has increased. Source: Paul Stiles, Novice Bear, January 10, 2008 51
  • Arizona Adult Arrests 20022012 Source: Arizona Department of Public Safety, “Crime in Arizona” Reports, 2002-2012 52
  • 45% Percentage that first-generation immigrants are less likely to commit any crime Source: Sampson, Morenoff, et. al.: Public Health Matters, Vol. 95., No. 2, pp. 224232 53
  • 13% Incarceration rate of native-born males 18-39 in California with less than a high school diploma Source: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008, p. 13 54
  • 0.48% Incarceration rate of immigrant males 18-40 in California with less than a high school diploma Source: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008, p. 13 55
  • 8 Times U.S. born men 18-40 are more likely than non-citizen Mexicans to be in CA jail or state prison. Source: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008 56
  • 5 Number of times native citizens are more likely to be incarcerated than any immigrant Source: Debunking the Myth of Immigrant Criminality: Imprisonment Among First- and SecondGeneration Young Men, Rubén G. Rumbaut, Roberto G. Gonzales, Golnaz Komaie, and Charlie V. Morgan, 2006 57
  • 74.5% The percentage of the U.S. prison population who are U.S. citizens Source: U.S Bureau of Prisons, BOP Quick Facts, October 26, 2013 58
  • 17.9% Percentage of the U.S. prison population who are Mexican citizens Source: U.S Bureau of Prisons, BOP Quick Facts, October 26, 2013 59
  • 28.3% Hispanics as a percentage of all persons arrested in Arizona in 2012 Source: Arizona Department of Public Safety, “Crime in Arizona,” 2012, p 62. 60
  • 29.6% Hispanics as a percentage of all Arizona residents, 2010 Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2010 Census Results 61
  • Hispanic Crime In Arizona Source: U.S. Census Bureau, “American Community Surveys,” 2004-2013, and ADPS “Crime in Arizona” reports 2004-2012 62
  • Crime Fallacies Unauthorized Claim Reality Difference % in Federal Prison 35% 17.5% +200% Prison Population 33% 13.8% +240% Violent Crime Drop 3X US Avg. 18.6% -15.2% +122% Hate Crime Increase ‘07-’09 Not a problem +26% +2,600% Identity Theft, Fraud & Forgery 100% 2.2% -97.8% 63
  • “Crime” Fallacy 253 inmate decrease equals 1.5% of total prisoners Source: Arizona Dept. Of Corrections CAGJul10.pdf - CAGMar12.pdf 65
  • Jobs 67
  • 59% Percent of undocumented Mexican immigrants who have not completed high-school Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Demographic Portrait of Mexican Origin Hispanics In The U.S., May 1, 2013, p. 36. 68
  • $501 Foreign-born Hispanic Median Weekly Earnings for 2012 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, FOREIGN-BORN WORKERS: LABOR FORCE Characteristics - 2012, Table 5 69
  • $641 Native-born Hispanic Median Weekly Earnings for 2012 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, FOREIGN-BORN WORKERS: LABOR FORCE Characteristics - 2012, Table 5 70
  • $7.80/hr Arizona minimum wage for 2013 Source: The Industrial Commission of Arizona, Minimum Wage Standard, 2013 . 71
  • $9.73/hr Arizona H-2A hourly Adverse Effect Wage Rate (AWER) for 2013 Source: USDA 75 FR 6884, February 12, 2010 72
  • $61,267 Median annual income for family of four in 2012 Source: Department of Justice, Median Income for 4-Person Families, by State, 2012 73
  • $71,000 Median salary of H1-B visa beneficiaries, 2013 Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, “Characteristics of H1B Specialty Workers, FY2012,” p. ii. 74
  • $36,000 Average family income of a migrant family of four Source: Pew Hispanic Center, “A Portrait of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States, 2009,” p. 16 75
  • 14 million Number of new jobs created in U.S. between 1996 and 2000 Source: Bean, Frank D., and Gillian Stevens, 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. 76
  • 12 million Total U.S. population growth between 1996 and 2000 Source: Bean, Frank D., and Gillian Stevens, 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. 77
  • Undocumented Impact on AZ Wages Source: Peri, Giovanni, “Immigration, Labor Market and Wages: The Economists’ Perspective,” slide 15. 78
  • Foreign-Born Labor Force: 2007 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, The Foreign-Born Labor Force in the United States: 2007 & 2012 79
  • Occupation on First Trip (Mexican) 0 % 0.3 % 0.4 % 0.4 % 0 % Source: Mexican Migration Project, MMP128 - PERS File 80
  • Annual Immigration Limits: 1996, 2004-2013 Source: DHS, Office of Immigration Statistics, Visa Bulletiin: 1996, 2004-2013 81
  • A Comparison of U.S. Wage Rates 1986-2011 Source: USDA, National Agriculture Statistics Service, Farm Labor: Wage Rate by Type by Year, US 82
  • 72 Number of hours to fill quota of 65,000 H1-B visas for 2014 Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 83
  • 60 Days needed to fill quota of 66,000 H-2B visas for 2014 Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 84
  • 30,000 Number of field workers needed in Yuma to bring in a winter lettuce crop Source: Interview on Desert Politics, Dec. 8, 2007 85
  • 318 Number of new “Employment Preference” visas issued to Mexican citizens for all of 2012 Source: U.S. Department of State, Report of the Visa Office 2012, Table III 86
  • 1,316,118 Number of Mexicans still waiting for their green-card applications to be accepted or rejected in 2013 Source: http://www.travel.state.gov/pdf/WaitingListItem.pdf 87
  • 5,000 Number of green cards annually available worldwide for low-wage workers to immigrate permanently Source: Section 203(e) of the Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act, as amended by Section 1(e) of Pub. L. 105-139. 88
  • 11,000 Agricultural job demand following GA’s passing HB87 in June, 2011 Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution 89
  • 14 Number of probationers ordered by GA Governor Deal to harvest crops who actually showed up Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution 90
  • 2 Number of Georgia probationers who remained in the fields after one week on the job Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution 91
  • Taxes 94
  • $940M Undocumented immigrant’s net financial benefit to the Arizona economy Source: University of Arizona, Immigrants in Arizona, Gans, 2006 95
  • $78M Undocumented immigrant’s sales tax contributions to the Arizona economy Source: University of Arizona, Immigrants in Arizona, Gans, 2006 96
  • $993B Earnings Suspense File account balance from non-matching SSNs as of the end of TY 2009 Source: U.S. Social Security Administration, SSA’S FY 2012 Performance and Accountability Report 97
  • 60% Percent growth in SSA Earnings Suspense File account balance 2005-2009 Source: U.S. Social Security Administration, SSA’S FY 2009 Performance and Accountability Report 98
  • $0 Amount of Suspense Fund balance payable to undocumented immigrants Source: U.S. Social Security Administration, Auditor’s Report, 2007 99
  • $1B Loss in Arizona state revenues from the loss of 50,000 immigrants Source: APS Immigration Loss Impact Study 100
  • $48.8B Annual estimated economic impact on Arizona’s economy from loss of 450,000 immigrants Source: “Rising Tide or Shrinking Pie,” Dr. Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, Marshall Fitz, March 2011 101
  • Zero Number of jurisdictions realizing any economic or social benefit promised by proponents of anti-immigration legislation Source: “A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Analysis of the Impact of the Oklahoma Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act of 2007,” Economic Impact Group, LLC, 2008 102
  • Assimilation & Integration 104
  • 1910 The year in which the percentage of foreign-born residents reached its peak of 14.7% Source: Pew Hispanic Center, 2007 and Gibbons and Lennon, 1999 105
  • 12.9% Percentage of foreign-born residents of the U.S. in 2010 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, The Foreign-Born Population in the United States: 2010 106
  • 13 Annual rate of immigrants per 1,000 U.S. residents in 1910 Source: The New Americans, National Research Council 107
  • 3 Annual rate of immigrants per 1,000 U.S. residents in 2005 Source: The New Americans, National Research Council 108
  • 25% Percentage of the immigrant population that could not speak English at all in 1900 Source: George Rodriguez, “ From Newcomers to New Americans...,” p. 18 109
  • 8% Percentage of the immigrant population that could not speak English at all in 1990 Source: George Rodriguez, “ From Newcomers to New Americans...,” p. 18 110
  • 95% Percentage of Mexican-Americans who could speak English well in 1990 Source: R. Alba and V. Nee, “Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration” p. 227 111
  • 47 million Number of U.S. citizens who speak a non-English language at home 19802000 Source: Bean FD, Stevens G. 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. New York: Russell Sage. P. 149 112
  • 757,434 Total number of new naturalized citizens in 2011 Source: DHS, Office of Immigration Statistics, Naturalizations in the U.S., 2012 113
  • 2X The rate at which Mexican immigrants become legal U.S. citizens compared to other countries Source: DHS, Office of Immigration Statistics, Naturalizations in the U.S., 2009 114
  • 10 Number of years after arrival that 75% of immigrants speak English as well as natives Source: American Immigration Lawyers Association, Myths vs, Facts 115
  • Learning the language Source: Pew Hispanic Center, “English Usage Among Hispanics in the United States,” November 29, 2007, and Migration Policy Institute, “Bilingualism Persists, But English Still Dominates,” February, 2005. 116
  • 30 Number of years the unavailability of English language programs delays assimilation Source: Pew Hispanic Center 117
  • 21.5% Percent of the recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor in U.S. wars who were immigrants Source: Congressional Medal of Honor Society, December, 2013 118
  • 51% Percentage of first-generation California immigrants (1970’s) who have purchased homes by 2000 Source: Russell Sage Foundation 119
  • 46% Percentage of California Hispanics who own their own homes, 2008 Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Demographic Profile of Hispanics in California, 2008 120
  • 53% Percentage of Arizona Hispanics who own their own homes, 2011 Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Demographic Profile of Hispanics in Arizona, 2011 121
  • 75% Percentage of all immigrants who have legal permanent resident status Source: Dept. of Homeland Security 122
  • 36% Percentage of eligible Mexicans who become U.S. citizens Source: Pew Hispanic Center, “The Path Not Taken,” February, 2013 123
  • Social & Health Services 124
  • 3% Percentage of any kind or any status of immigrant who receives food stamps Source: Federalist Society Seminar Immigration, Amnesty and the Rule of Law, Nov. 16, 2007 125
  • 10 Years legal permanent residents must pay into Social Security and Medicare before they get benefits Source: Congressional Research Service 126
  • 10% Percentage of California’s uncompensated health care in 2007 attributable to undocumented immigrant’s E.R. use Source: California Hospital Association 127
  • 13% National percentage of “Hispanic or Latino” total E.R. visits in 2006 Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2006 Emergency Department Summary, Table 2: Number, percent distribution, and annual rate of emergency department visits with corresponding standard errors, by patient characteristics: United States, 2006 128
  • 61% “White non-Hispanic” percentage of total Arizona E.R. visits in 2008 Source: ADHS Table 4C-2 “Rates* of Emergency Room Visits by Race/Ethnicity and Gender, Arizona, 2008 129
  • 23% Percentage of total Arizona E.R. visits by Hispanics 2005 Source: ASU Center for Health Information & Research, Race/Ethnicity, Figure 4. 130
  • 50% Percent undocumented immigrants are less likely to use emergency rooms than native Latinos Source: Sampson, Morenoff, et. al.: Public Health Matters, Vol. 95., No. 2 131
  • 2.1 The number of fewer doctor visits of undocumented Latinos compared with their US-born counterparts Source: Alexander N. Ortega, PhD, et.al; Archives of Internal Medicine. 2007;167(21): 2354-2360 132
  • 1/2 - 2/3 Recent immigrants' per-person unadjusted medical expenditures compared to U.S. born, even when immigrants had full insurance Source: Alexander N. Ortega, PhD, et.al; Archives of Internal Medicine. 2007;167(21): 2354-2360 133
  • $11 Estimated taxes per-person spent annually on health care for undocumented immigrants aged 1864 Source: “Immigrants And The Cost Of Medical Care: Health Affairs, 25, no. 6 (2006): 1700-1711 134
  • “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” Mark Twain 135
  • Other Facts 136
  • 0 Number of undocumented immigrants who registered to vote in Maricopa County 1991-Present Source: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 137
  • Felony Level of crime for any non-citizen to attempt to register to vote Source: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 138
  • Zero A green-card holder’s chances of becoming a U.S. citizen after attempting to register to vote Source: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 139
  • 25 Number of states legislatures where SB 1070 copycat laws were introduced in 2011 Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 140
  • 4 Number of states where SB 1070 copycats passed into law in 2011 Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 141
  • 84% Failure rate of state SB 1070 copycat laws in 2011 Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 142
  • Economic Impact Fallacies Unauthorized Claim Reality Difference % of AZ Population 10% 7% +30% Education Costs $810M $379M +214% Health Costs $400M $24M +1,600% Tax Payments $257M $2.84B -1,100% 143
  • Economics of Population Loss Immigrant Pop. Decline Gross State Product Loss Income Loss Job Loss Tax Revenue Loss 15% $8.3B $5.3B 99,000 $636M 30% $14.4B $9.4B 172,000 $1.27B 50% $20B $15.7B 291,000 $2.11B 100% $48.8B $29.5B 581,000 $4.22B Source: "A Rising Tide or a Shrinking Pie," M. Fitz and R. Hinojosa, Immigration Policy Council, March, 2011. 144
  • Arizona Poll Results 147
  • 65% Disagree with classifying undocumented immigrants as “common criminals” Source: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 148
  • 66% Agree that politicians are turning immigration into an “ugly racial issue” Source: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 149
  • 78% Agree that a “guest worker” program should be implemented Source: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 150
  • 83% Agree that fair and humane treatment of foreign workers is as important as securing the border Source: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 151
  • “The greatest threat to democracy is having a public that thinks it is fully informed, but really isn’t very well informed at all.” Linda Foley 152