0
How OSS Failed
Dispersed Teams
Or...
Writing OSS that People Will Actually Use
Who I Am
Why you should care
Why you should care
I Love FLOSS
GNU/Linux Hippie
Emacs Fiend
Corporate Infiltrator
Creator/Contributor
http://github.com/avdi
Dispersed Teams
Geographically separated, working together
Sound Familiar?
We practically invented the dispersed team
Developers love FLOSS tools
FLOSS: It's not just cheaper, it's better
...right?
So I have this website
http://wideteams.com
Interviews
Dispersed teams aren't using FLOSS (much)
Why not?
The remote toolkit
●Voice/Video Chat
●Chat Rooms
●Screen Sharing
●Version Control
Voice/Video Chat
SIP/H.323
1. Choose a
Protocol
2. Host a Server
3. Find clients
4. Set up accounts
5. Tell everyone how to
connect
6. Maintain it
Skype
1. Download it
2. Create accounts
3. Log in
(4. Complain about how annoying Skype is)
Chat Rooms
IRC/Jabber
1. Host a server
2. Set up a log
server
4. Set up accounts
5. Get everyone
connected
6. Maintain It
Campfire
1. Set up account
2. Define Users
3. Send a link
Screen Sharing
VNC
1. Get [compatible] software
2. Punch hole in firewall
3. Figure out SSH tunneling
4. Look up your IP address
5. Connect
6. Public wifi? Forget it.
TeamViewer
1. Download it
1. Download it
2. Start it
3. Send session ID
4. Connect
Version Control
FLOSS!
GIT
...hosted on GitHub
Most teams do centralized
version control
No one wants to host their own
Observations
Social Software
“How will it help to get
your users laid?” - JWZ
A Means to an End
Connecting people
The Distributed Mindset
Centralization is underrated
Jabber: Gtalk, GIT: GitHub
Everyone else is there
Small Teams
No DevOps
Lessons
1. Do one thing well easily
2. Lower the Barrier to Entry
Do the Web UI First
Services, not protocols
Clients will follow
3. Release Early
But you knew that
Diaspora
4. Host it
One Well-Known Host
Leave the distributed
architecture for 2.0
...or forget it entirely
5. Sell it
You need to pay for hosting
You need good feedback
You need an incentive
Your users need confidence
Projects
talkerapp.com
teambox.com
EtherPad
dimdim.com
Google Wave
Conclusion
We need more OSS
Fix It!
Thank You
Avdi Grimm
avdi@avdi.org
Twitter: @avdi / @wideteams
http://avdi.org/devblog
http://wideteams.com
http://shiprise.net
How to Write Open Source Software that People Will Actually Use
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How to Write Open Source Software that People Will Actually Use

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A look at why geographically dispersed software development teams aren't using Free, Libre, and Open Source Software [FLOSS] for their collaboration needs - and what FLOSS developers can learn from it.

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Transcript of "How to Write Open Source Software that People Will Actually Use"

  1. 1. How OSS Failed Dispersed Teams
  2. 2. Or...
  3. 3. Writing OSS that People Will Actually Use
  4. 4. Who I Am
  5. 5. Why you should care
  6. 6. Why you should care
  7. 7. I Love FLOSS
  8. 8. GNU/Linux Hippie
  9. 9. Emacs Fiend
  10. 10. Corporate Infiltrator
  11. 11. Creator/Contributor
  12. 12. http://github.com/avdi
  13. 13. Dispersed Teams
  14. 14. Geographically separated, working together
  15. 15. Sound Familiar?
  16. 16. We practically invented the dispersed team
  17. 17. Developers love FLOSS tools
  18. 18. FLOSS: It's not just cheaper, it's better
  19. 19. ...right?
  20. 20. So I have this website
  21. 21. http://wideteams.com
  22. 22. Interviews
  23. 23. Dispersed teams aren't using FLOSS (much)
  24. 24. Why not?
  25. 25. The remote toolkit
  26. 26. ●Voice/Video Chat ●Chat Rooms ●Screen Sharing ●Version Control
  27. 27. Voice/Video Chat
  28. 28. SIP/H.323
  29. 29. 1. Choose a Protocol
  30. 30. 2. Host a Server
  31. 31. 3. Find clients
  32. 32. 4. Set up accounts
  33. 33. 5. Tell everyone how to connect
  34. 34. 6. Maintain it
  35. 35. Skype
  36. 36. 1. Download it
  37. 37. 2. Create accounts
  38. 38. 3. Log in
  39. 39. (4. Complain about how annoying Skype is)
  40. 40. Chat Rooms
  41. 41. IRC/Jabber
  42. 42. 1. Host a server
  43. 43. 2. Set up a log server
  44. 44. 4. Set up accounts
  45. 45. 5. Get everyone connected
  46. 46. 6. Maintain It
  47. 47. Campfire
  48. 48. 1. Set up account
  49. 49. 2. Define Users
  50. 50. 3. Send a link
  51. 51. Screen Sharing
  52. 52. VNC
  53. 53. 1. Get [compatible] software
  54. 54. 2. Punch hole in firewall
  55. 55. 3. Figure out SSH tunneling
  56. 56. 4. Look up your IP address
  57. 57. 5. Connect
  58. 58. 6. Public wifi? Forget it.
  59. 59. TeamViewer
  60. 60. 1. Download it
  61. 61. 1. Download it
  62. 62. 2. Start it
  63. 63. 3. Send session ID
  64. 64. 4. Connect
  65. 65. Version Control
  66. 66. FLOSS!
  67. 67. GIT
  68. 68. ...hosted on GitHub
  69. 69. Most teams do centralized version control
  70. 70. No one wants to host their own
  71. 71. Observations
  72. 72. Social Software
  73. 73. “How will it help to get your users laid?” - JWZ
  74. 74. A Means to an End
  75. 75. Connecting people
  76. 76. The Distributed Mindset
  77. 77. Centralization is underrated
  78. 78. Jabber: Gtalk, GIT: GitHub
  79. 79. Everyone else is there
  80. 80. Small Teams
  81. 81. No DevOps
  82. 82. Lessons
  83. 83. 1. Do one thing well easily
  84. 84. 2. Lower the Barrier to Entry
  85. 85. Do the Web UI First
  86. 86. Services, not protocols
  87. 87. Clients will follow
  88. 88. 3. Release Early
  89. 89. But you knew that
  90. 90. Diaspora
  91. 91. 4. Host it
  92. 92. One Well-Known Host
  93. 93. Leave the distributed architecture for 2.0
  94. 94. ...or forget it entirely
  95. 95. 5. Sell it
  96. 96. You need to pay for hosting
  97. 97. You need good feedback
  98. 98. You need an incentive
  99. 99. Your users need confidence
  100. 100. Projects
  101. 101. talkerapp.com
  102. 102. teambox.com
  103. 103. EtherPad
  104. 104. dimdim.com
  105. 105. Google Wave
  106. 106. Conclusion
  107. 107. We need more OSS
  108. 108. Fix It!
  109. 109. Thank You
  110. 110. Avdi Grimm avdi@avdi.org Twitter: @avdi / @wideteams http://avdi.org/devblog http://wideteams.com http://shiprise.net
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