The Human Interface

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Watch video here: http://vimeo.com/9661208

In "The Human Interface", I explain how we can make better products when we think of them as human beings.

This is the version I presented at the Interaction 10 conference in Savannah (significantly updated from the one presented at the 2009 O'Reilly Web 2.0 Expo in New York).

Apologies to all the cited people and rights-holders I have not yet had time to credit.

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The Human Interface

  1. The Human Interface Christopher Fahey graphpaper.com @chrisfahey #ixd10 #human
  2. ROBOTS?
  3. I HATE ROBOTS!
  4. PYGMALION
  5. THE REPLACEMENTS
  6. THE REPLACEMENTS
  7. CYBORGS?
  8. ”As our worlds become smarter, and get to know us better and better, it becomes harder and harder to say where the world stops and the person begins.” - Andy Clarke, “Natural Born Cyborgs”
  9. THE UNCANNY VALLEY (Masahiro Mori)
  10. The Uncanny Valley
  11. The Uncanny Valley (How comfortable ACCEPTANCE we feel around the machine.) FIDELITY (How well the machine mimics human characteristics.)
  12. The Uncanny Valley
  13. The Uncanny Valley
  14. Lessons so far: 1. Don’t replace humans. 2. Don’t replicate humans.
  15. Origins
  16. What childhood experiences most powerfully influence your approach to interaction design today?
  17. Childhood IxD Experiences 1. Taking things apart to see how they work 2. Fixing broken things 3. Creating little worlds
  18. Why? 1. Interaction design is a creative form. UX designers want to use technology and design to create emotional, imaginative, and deeply human experiences.
  19. Why? 1. Interaction design is a creative form. UX designers want to use technology and design to create emotional, imaginative, and deeply human experiences. 2. Change is in the air. New technologies are converging to permit new and more compelling interactions.
  20. New Technologies Image recognition Touch Voice recognition Gesture
  21. New Technologies
  22. Not so new
  23. Not so new
  24. Not so new
  25. About the “Human Interface”
  26. “An interface is humane if it is responsive to human needs and is considerate of human frailties.” - Jef Raskin, “The Humane Interface”
  27. “Design can be easier when we acknowledge that products share our homes and malls, and have wants and lives of their own.” - Matt Webb, BERG
  28. “If we want users to like our software, we should design it to behave like a likeable person.” - Alan Cooper
  29. We make better products when we think of them as human beings.
  30. “The role of technology is to mirror our humanness. We were born with everything we need: good technology reminds us of that.” - Jack Dorsey (@jack), CEO Twitter
  31. The Human Interface... ... is about persuasion and seduction ... is smart and has awareness ... is physical, embodied ... is linguistic, poetic, and narrative ... is emotional and feeling ... has a name and an identity ... has a personality
  32. “Want to know what I think the next UI break- throughs will be? Here are two, both of which can be considered a return to fundamentals: 1. Command line languages; 2. Physicality: the return to physical devices, where we control things by physical body movement, by turning, moving, and manipulating appropriate mechanical devices.” - Don Norman, 2007
  33. The Human Interface
  34. The Human Interface Literally, it’s about the ergonomics of the body and the mind.
  35. The Human Interface Literally, it’s about the ergonomics of the body and the mind. Metaphorically, it’s about removing abstraction from interactions
  36. Lessons so far: 1. Don’t replace humans. 2. Don’t replicate humans.
  37. Lessons so far: 1. Don’t replace humans. 2. Don’t replicate humans. How?
  38. Lessons so far: 1. Don’t replace humans. 2. Don’t replicate humans. How? Behavior!
  39. Lessons so far: Not about mimicking human behavior, but about reflecting it. Software that mirrors behavior: • Chat and IM reflect the immediacy of communication • Social networks mirror the structure of the special primacy we give our own friends (vs. everyone else) • Twitter reflects the semi-social “cocktail party” model of social interaction.
  40. Paul Dourish: “Where the Action Is”
  41. Reeves & Nass: “The Media Equation”
  42. Ergonomics for the Mind (cups designed by the “other” Masahiro Mori)
  43. Anthopomorphism
  44. Human-ness
  45. Human-ness (Christopher Alexander) The Quality Without a Name (QWAN) aka The Phenomenon of Life
  46. Human-ness (Christopher Alexander) 1. Levels of Scale Fifteen 2. Strong Centers 3. Thick Boundaries Properties 4. Alternating Repetition 5. Positive Space of Living 6. Good Shape Structures 7. Local Symmetries 8. Deep Interlock and Ambiguity 9. Contrast 10. Gradients 11. Roughness 12. Echoes 13. The Void 14. Simplicity and Inner Calm 15. Non-Separateness
  47. Human-ness (Christopher Alexander) 1. Levels of Scale Fifteen 2. Strong Centers 3. Thick Boundaries Properties 4. Alternating Repetition 5. Positive Space of Living 6. Good Shape Structures 7. Local Symmetries 8. Deep Interlock and Ambiguity 9. Contrast 10. Gradients 11. Roughness 12. Echoes 13. The Void 14. Simplicity and Inner Calm 15. Non-Separateness
  48. Human-ness (Christopher Alexander) 1. Levels of Scale Fifteen 2. Strong Centers 3. Thick Boundaries Properties 4. Alternating Repetition 5. Positive Space of Living 6. Good Shape Structures 7. Local Symmetries 8. Deep Interlock and Ambiguity 9. Contrast 10. Gradients 11. Roughness 12. Echoes 13. The Void 14. Simplicity and Inner Calm 15. Non-Separateness
  49. Human-ness (Christopher Alexander) 1. Levels of Scale Fifteen 2. Strong Centers 3. Thick Boundaries Properties 4. Alternating Repetition 5. Positive Space of Living 6. Good Shape Structures 7. Local Symmetries 8. Deep Interlock and Ambiguity 9. Contrast 10. Gradients 11. Roughness 12. Echoes 13. The Void 14. Simplicity and Inner Calm 15. Non-Separateness
  50. Human-ness (Christopher Alexander) 1. Levels of Scale Fifteen 2. Strong Centers 3. Thick Boundaries Properties 4. Alternating Repetition 5. Positive Space of Living 6. Good Shape Structures 7. Local Symmetries 8. Deep Interlock and Ambiguity 9. Contrast 10. Gradients 11. Roughness 12. Echoes 13. The Void 14. Simplicity and Inner Calm 15. Non-Separateness
  51. Katherine Isbister: Better Game Characters by Design
  52. Human-ness (Katherine Isbister) External Internal Characteristics of Characteristics of Personhood Personhood • Bodies • Agreeableness • Faces • Dominance • Voices • Openness • Conscientiousness • Neuroticism
  53. The Three Qualia of the Human Interface
  54. Three Qualia of the Human Interface: Sentience Intimacy Personality
  55. Sentience
  56. Sentience: The ability to feel or perceive subjectively. The system is able to collect robust sensory data from the world, and make sense of that data.
  57. The Human Sensorium
  58. Voice Recognition
  59. Image and Face Recognition
  60. Nintendo Wii
  61. Not always robust Not all sensory data need be robust to a system to make extremely intelligent deductions from the data.
  62. Not always robust Not all sensory data need be robust to a system to make extremely intelligent deductions from the data.
  63. Not always robust Not all sensory data need be robust to a system to make extremely intelligent deductions from the data.
  64. Not always robust Not all sensory data need be robust to a system to make extremely intelligent deductions from the data.
  65. Project Natal (Microsoft)
  66. Project Natal (Microsoft)
  67. Project Natal (Microsoft)
  68. Artificial Intelligences
  69. The Uncanny Valley: Sentience
  70. The Uncanny Valley: Sentience Creepy stalker
  71. The Uncanny Valley: Sentience Observant and conscientious Creepy stalker
  72. Intimacy
  73. 2. Intimacy: The quality of being close, comfortable, and familiar. The system can interface with humans extremely closely, up close and personal, and with our glad consent.
  74. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  75. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  76. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  77. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  78. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  79. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  80. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  81. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  82. Intimacy Intimacy can be facilitated with and through machines: • Emotional Intelligence • Proximity • Presence • Social Web • Personal Informatics • Multiplayer Games • Real Time Web • Conversations
  83. Machines that talk back
  84. Machines that talk back
  85. Conversations
  86. Dialogue! Dialog? Conversations
  87. Politeness Clifford Nass: “Design solutions are often social solutions.” Tom Armitage: “The applications and tools we are building are, whether we like it or not, defining the manners of the web today. We should be careful to consider the behaviors we wish to reinforce, and those we don't.”
  88. Politeness • Don't reject • Don't interrupt • Say hello and goodbye • Use someone's name • Look people in the eye • Respond in kind • Respect differences
  89. Politeness Praise Conversations
  90. Identity
  91. “You are not your job, you're not how much money you have in the bank, you're not the car you drive, you're not the contents of your wallet, you're not your fucking khakis.” - Tyler Durden, “Fight Club”
  92. “You are not your job, you're not how much money you have in the bank, you're not the car you drive, you're not the contents of your wallet, you're not your fucking khakis.” No! You are your fucking khakis! - Tyler Durden, “Fight Club”
  93. Personality
  94. Personality: The sum of an individual person’s mental, emotional, behavioral, and social characteristics. The system has a distinctive character, with recognizable human cultural and psychological behaviors.
  95. We see faces
  96. Facial Fidelity
  97. The Uncanny Valley: Faces
  98. Personality Characteristics
  99. The Four Humours
  100. Myers-Briggs
  101. Interpersonal Circumplex
  102. Interpersonal Circumplex Agreeableness (Communion) Dominance (Agency)
  103. Interpersonal Circumplex
  104. Interpersonal Circumplex
  105. Voice
  106. Voice = Content Strategy
  107. Personality Characters: • More than personality: Culture, Style • Casting • Names • Personas • Storytelling and Themes
  108. Personality Characters: • More than personality: Culture, Style • Casting • Names • Personas • Storytelling and Themes
  109. Personality Characters: • More than personality: Culture, Style • Casting • Names • Personas • Storytelling and Themes
  110. Personality Characters: • More than personality: Culture, Style • Casting • Names • Personas • Storytelling and Themes
  111. What’s in a Name Maximillian Linus
  112. The Uncanny Valley: Names Bob, Jeeves
  113. The Uncanny Valley: Names Bob, Jeeves TiVo, iPhone
  114. Personality Characters: • More than personality: Culture, Style • Casting • Names • Personas • Storytelling and Themes
  115. Personality Characters: • More than personality: Culture, Style • Casting • Names • Personas • Storytelling and Themes
  116. Brands
  117. Broken Personalities
  118. Conclusions
  119. The Human Interface
  120. The Uncanny Valley Unthreatening Appearance Annoying Personality
  121. Things to try • Use pronouns for your product: he, she. • Give your application a name • Do more visceral prototypes, things that have weight and that you can touch. • Collaborate with new disciplines • Go to a different field’s conference. Go to the Game Developer’s Conference, or to SIGGRAPH. • Tell more stories! Bring character-driven screenwriting and dramaturgy to your experience design.
  122. If we don’t humanize our products, our products will mechanize us.
  123. Thanks! Christopher Fahey @chrisfahey #ixd10 #human graphpaper.com

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