1            Peterborough            Buildings in Need            September 2011 – June 2012Heritage Lottery Fund Project ...
2
3ContentsThis report booklet comprises of the report on the project outcomes andachievements, including a summary of resul...
4
5Executive SummaryThe Peterborough Buildings in Need project has been running sinceSeptember 2011, and will finish on June...
6Through understanding and awareness raising of the historic environment ofPeterboroughs city centre, members of the local...
7It created an on-line toolkit of resources, including a traffic light style systemfor flagging levels of need, to enable ...
8Project AimsThe overall project aims are as follows:      Raise public awareness of the heritage value of Peterborough w...
9In order to achieve this the following approved purposes of grant wereagreed upon:      Create an interactive project we...
10Overview of Project OutcomesThe project outcomes split into 5 key interlocking areas, the online presenceof the project ...
11given up their time for the project), building surveys and the promotion andcelebration of the project as a whole.1) Onl...
12The pages allow the user to drill down to reports on previous events, all ofwhich have a page on the site. Some of the e...
132) Steering GroupOutcomes    Establish a community steering groupUpdateSteering Group established, the initial meeting ...
143) Training for volunteers and the general publicOutcomes    Deliver four walking tours and at least 12 master classes ...
15About Shape East:SHAPE EAST is a Centre for Design Excellence and Sustainable Innovationbased in the East of England. We...
16    Quarry and Geology Visit    On April 30 and May 1 student volunteer groups from Peterborough Regional    College and...
17Using hand lenses toidentify oolithic andshelly Lincolnshirelimestones.
18Photos from theGeoPeterborough days
19
20Lectures12 arranged in total, up from 10 originally proposedTotal attendees: 718 of 350 total required for whole project...
21Lecture Summary Table                                                                Number of      Date                ...
22MasterclassesThe Masterclasses also have a feedback element to them. Every attendee isgiven a feedback form and asked to...
23
24Total number of Masterclasses run is 17 from the original 12 suggestedincluding one Heritage workshop run by SPAB out at...
25Masterclass Summary Table               Date      Title                                              Attendees          ...
264) Building SurveysOutcomes    Carry out a survey of at least 50 buildings in need in Peterborough by     volunteer par...
27expertise found within the society meant they could really hit the groundrunning on this and results were returned by th...
28to be visiting the city centre with the project officer to examine some of thebuildings considered at greater need by th...
29Total buildings surveyed is 247 (239 different buildings)Number of volunteers: 40Total amount of volunteer time for surv...
30Some of the buildings have been surveyed more than once, with the collegestudents comparing earlier results to their own...
31Civic Society City Centre Survey Results                        Map of survey area showing resultsResultsTotal city cent...
32St),Back entrance to JJB sports throughwheel yard6/6a Cathedral Square                      NB we arranged to clean gutt...
33David Turnock Architects: Summary Report For Buildings in NeedBUILDINGS IN NEED SUMMARY REPORTOver the period from Octob...
34Poor                         10 Properties                15%Fair                         30 Properties                4...
35(lower Broadway and Park Road areas) or private houses. The mainexception to this is the Kings School on Park Road where...
36at Ruddle Wilkinson Architects. David succeeded in developing his Clientbase and moved into new offices designed by the ...
375) Promotion and CelebrationOutcomes    Promote the project and engage with interested local groups at a     minimum of...
38Due toinsurance issuesit has not beenpossible to havevolunteerwalking tours onthe night, but avolunteer who isalso a gui...
39Below, a selection of the flyers and posters used to promote the project.The final event took place on June 28th at 6pm ...
40Antony Mould from the Cambridge Bat Group on Radio Peterborough.Regular press releases have been sent to the local newsp...
41
42
43Contents03. Introduction04. How to use the Toolkit12. Sources of Information13. Appendix A: Letter for Volunteers14. App...
43Part I: Introduction                        details of which were turned into                                           ...
44To avoid more heritage assets endingup ‘at risk’ and to reduce the many         Developed for use in Peterboroughfactors...
45           ‘Maintenance of heritage assets   A survey such as Buildings in Need           is essential if they are not t...
46Part II: How to Use the                     answer in every section but do try to if                                    ...
47                                             wish to suggest which of these three                                       ...
48Current UseIs it a shop, cafe, estate agents? Pleasefill in the main use and function of thebuilding here.              ...
49woodwork, or signs of cracking to the                     roof1? Is the roof line straight orglass. Do they look origina...
50rot in exposed timber framing orvandalismFig 15 and 16. Damaged paintwork and stone/brick workGuttering and downpipesDo ...
51                                                       masonry, leaking roofs,                                          ...
52                                                         Estimate of urgency of works?                                  ...
53maps and the project website for the            The annual English Heritage registercomplete set of outputs             ...
54Sources of Information:                       HELM website:                                              http://www.helm...
55Appendix A – Letter for volunteers Telephone:        01733 317480 Facsimile:        01733 453505 E-Mail:           alice...
56Appendix B – Survey Form Buildings in                          Buildings in Need Need                          Survey Fo...
575. Condition of windowsPlease tick or underlineGood - structurally sound, well maintained and paintedFair - showing some...
588. Do the rainwater goods appear sound?       Gutt ers with plant growth visible       Cracks       No obvious problem9....
59NotesThere is more information on Buildings in Need at:www.Pet erboroughBuildingsinNeed.Wordpress.comIs it listed?To est...
60Appendix C: Excel Spreadsheet of results and Google Maps
Alice KershawHeritage Regeneration OfficerEmail: alice.kershaw@peterborough.gov.ukWebsite: www.opportunitypeterborough.co....
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  1. 1. 1 Peterborough Buildings in Need September 2011 – June 2012Heritage Lottery Fund Project Reference: YH-11-00479Project Update: June 2012Report Author: Alice Kershaw, Heritage Regeneration Officer, OpportunityPeterborough
  2. 2. 2
  3. 3. 3ContentsThis report booklet comprises of the report on the project outcomes andachievements, including a summary of results verified by a local architect,and the toolkit for doing a Buildings in Need SurveySection Title Page numberExecutive Summary 5Overview of Project 5Project Aims 8Overview of Project Outcomes 101) Online 112) Steering Group 133) Training for volunteers and the general public 13  Quarry Visit 16  Lectures 20  Masterclasses 224) Building Surveys 26  Civic Society City Centre Survey Results 31  Verification and summary of results by David Turnock, Architect 335) Promotion and Celebration 37Press coverage 37Support in Kind 40Costs 40Buildings in Need Toolkit 42 1. Introduction 43 2. How to use the Toolkit 46 3. Sources of Information 54 4. Appendix A: Letter for Volunteers 55 5. Appendix B: Survey Form 56 6. Appendix C: Excel Spreadsheet of results and Google Maps 60
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 5Executive SummaryThe Peterborough Buildings in Need project has been running sinceSeptember 2011, and will finish on June 28th 2012 with a celebration event.Between September and November 2011 over 1100 people have attended alecture or workshop on the project, in total 12 lectures at St Johns Church and17 workshops at various historic locations have been run, as well as a series ofvisits.Three groups of volunteers from the Civic Society, University CentrePeterborough and Peterborough Regional College have surveyed over 250buildings and given over 40 days of volunteer time to the project. The projecthas been promoted at over 6 events, with hundreds of flyers, posters andusing a variety of social media tools. The project website is up and running,with 40 pages, 10 posts and 5 modules available on it. An embedded maphelps share the gathered information. Photos showing aspects of buildings that can put them ‘in need’. From top left, missing architectural features in the Park Area, Graffiti on Broadway (Park Area) and growth in gutters in the City Centre Conservation Area.Overview of ProjectPeterborough Buildings in Need ran from September 2011 until the end ofJune 2012, nine months in total. The total Heritage Lottery Fund grant for theproject was £24,200. The project officer is Alice Kershaw.
  6. 6. 6Through understanding and awareness raising of the historic environment ofPeterboroughs city centre, members of the local community have learntwhat puts the historic environment in need of becoming officially at risk, thechallenges faced by the historic environment and how these can bemanaged. This training was provided in the form of daytime, evening, halfand full day courses for both dedicated volunteers and for the generalpublic, as a way of sharing information and to encourage participation in theproject.This project trained users of the space to understand aspects such assignificance setting and levels of need. It created the most completebuilding by building snapshot survey of the degree of need present withinthe city centre conservation area. This survey was carried out by volunteersfrom the general public, local groups members and volunteers, who wastrained up and supported by the Heritage Regeneration Officer and BuiltEnvironment team.
  7. 7. 7It created an on-line toolkit of resources, including a traffic light style systemfor flagging levels of need, to enable people to engage on a local level withthe management of the built heritage of Peterborough, as a lasting legacy ofthe project. People were engaged as on the ground heritage champions,aware of the built environment and the vulnerabilities found there.
  8. 8. 8Project AimsThe overall project aims are as follows:  Raise public awareness of the heritage value of Peterborough with a focus on the City Centre  Promote the good management of heritage assets  Deliver a programme of targeted training, activities and events  Provide support, feedback and development opportunities for volunteers  Provide comprehensive, accessible information on the condition of our heritage
  9. 9. 9In order to achieve this the following approved purposes of grant wereagreed upon:  Create an interactive project website for participants using Wordpress, to allow access to downloadable resources, training modules and survey results  Produce five online modules containing training material and project resources  Establish a community steering group  Deliver four walking tours and at least 12 master classes as part of the training for participants.  Carry out a survey of at least 50 buildings in need in Peterborough by volunteer participants. Validate the results and obtain feedback from professional architects and surveyors.  Deliver a historic environment workshop for at least 20 attendees, plus a lunchtime and an evening lecture series with 350 attendees over ten sessions  Promote the project and engage with interested local groups at a minimum of six meetings/events e.g. amenity society meetings, Heritage Open Days etc  Celebrate the projects achievements with a launch event for the public, including walking tours led by volunteers, hands on workshops and the publication of the survey results.
  10. 10. 10Overview of Project OutcomesThe project outcomes split into 5 key interlocking areas, the online presenceof the project through a website, the steering group, training for volunteersand the general public (for the purposes of this grant the general publiccount as volunteers once they have undergone any training, as they have
  11. 11. 11given up their time for the project), building surveys and the promotion andcelebration of the project as a whole.1) OnlineOutcomes  Create an interactive project website for participants using Wordpress, to allow access to downloadable resources, training modules and survey results  Produce five online modules containing training material and project resourcesUpdateThe Wordpress website www.peterboroughbuildingsinneed.wordpress.comhas been created, maintained and updated by the project officer. It is a freeopen source Wordpress blog converted to a website. As such it has nocurrent or forward costs for hosting and will continue to run beyond the lengthof the project. The straightforward content management system allows forquick and flexible updates and editing through the ‘dashboard’, also at nocost. So far it has had over 4000 individual hits, and the daily visitation rate isrising.It has over 40 individual pages and 10 front page posts. The front page alsolinks to the social media aspects of the promotion, the Twitter(@buildingsinneed) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/buildingsinneed)page which allow communication to and from the project on different freeplatforms. A ‘Box net’ widget on the main page also allows downloads of keydocuments, flyers for events and fact sheets.
  12. 12. 12The pages allow the user to drill down to reports on previous events, all ofwhich have a page on the site. Some of the event pages, under ‘resources’,have embedded Slideshare slideshows if these have been made available bythe speaker. These allow the viewer to download or run on screen the lectureslides. It is also free open source software. Alongside slide shows there arephotos of the events taking place and in many cases short summaries of keypoints written by the project officer and uploaded very soon after the event.Bibliographies and links to relevant sites are also embedded where available.Results are added to a Google Map embedded into the site, and can beviewed by the public, so far it has had several hundred hits.The 5 module pages are all populated to a certain degree, with theexception of the final module, which can only be populated once theproject final results have been returned. These link to the resource pages andalso to slides, PDF documents and e-books where relevant.Starting with the use of social media for promotion, including a Twitterdictionary, downloads of slides on social media and quick guides to usingWordpress and Google maps, as well as Twitter and Facebook, the firstmodule helps to break down the boundaries of online usage for thosevolunteers not so familiar with the medium. As a result of the workshop onsocial media, an additional 5 participants are now on Twitter and using it tohighlight the built environment.
  13. 13. 132) Steering GroupOutcomes  Establish a community steering groupUpdateSteering Group established, the initial meeting was held in September 2011,the second in November 2011, and another three meetings held before thecompletion of the project. The community steering group consists of localrepresentatives from Opportunity Peterborough, Peterborough RegionalCollege and University Centre Peterborough, Peterborough Civic Society,Peterborough City Council, Natural England and English Heritage, St John theBaptist Community Interest Company, Peterborough Environment City Trust,Vivacity Culture and Leisure Trust and Peterborough Cathedral. All of thesemembers are key stakeholders within the City Centre area of Peterboroughand within the heritage sector of the Unitary Authority area and beyond. Thiswill allow dissemination of results of the project and legacy.The feedback from this steering group has been valuable in driving thedirection of the project, developing contacts, finding volunteers and eventsuggestions and speakers.
  14. 14. 143) Training for volunteers and the general publicOutcomes  Deliver four walking tours and at least 12 master classes as part of the training for participants.  Deliver a historic environment workshop for at least 20 attendees, plus a lunchtime and an evening lecture series with 350 attendees over ten sessionsUpdate12 lectures in St Johns Church and 17 Masterclasses have been delivered forthis project, with over 1000 attendees across the two. The attendancenumbers and information on the events are below. Walking tours have beenundertaken with volunteer groups and are highlighted in the survey sectionbelow. So far four walking tours have been undertaken. Two more for thegeneral public are taking place as part of the Peterborough Heritage Festival.Three of the Masterclasses were delivered by Shape East.
  15. 15. 15About Shape East:SHAPE EAST is a Centre for Design Excellence and Sustainable Innovationbased in the East of England. We are dedicated to providing a positiveinfluence on the quality of urban design and the built environment throughsupporting the professional community, engaging the public and facilitatingdebate and understanding between the two. We do this by running a diverseand ever-changing range of events; from professional training seminars topublic lectures, local walking tours to school model-making workshops.Our central objectives are to:  Inspire and excite people about the built environment and help them see it through fresh eyes.  Increase understanding of the importance of good planning, urban design, architecture and construction.  Encourage people to participate in the planning and other processes which shape change in their communities.  Prepare the ground for the future by engaging children and young people in built environment issues.http://www.shape-east.org.uk/
  16. 16. 16 Quarry and Geology Visit On April 30 and May 1 student volunteer groups from Peterborough Regional College and University Centre Peterborough, in association with this project and GeoPeterborough (representatives on the Buildings in Need steering group via Natural England) went on a visit to geological sites across the district to see processes relating to the geology of the built environment, and that geology in situ. The agenda was the same both days and 15 students and two tutors attended each day. Jonathan giving a talk in the morning. The morning began with two short lectures by Dr Jonathan Larwood and Dr Colin Prosser, both Geologists with Natural England, followed by a tour of Peterborough city centre, including Cathedral Precincts and the Cathedral itself. The afternoon was a visit to Ketton Quarry followed by a visit to nearby Stamford stone to see the stone being carved before shipping.Colin pointing out redgranite setts in theCathedral Precincts
  17. 17. 17Using hand lenses toidentify oolithic andshelly Lincolnshirelimestones.
  18. 18. 18Photos from theGeoPeterborough days
  19. 19. 19
  20. 20. 20Lectures12 arranged in total, up from 10 originally proposedTotal attendees: 718 of 350 total required for whole project. Over 100%increase on original outcome. As a result of this lecture series St John’s Churchhave continued to run lectures as a way of bringing life to the building. Photos from the lecture series
  21. 21. 21Lecture Summary Table Number of Date Attendees 11-Oct Victorian Peterborough, Brian White 43 Heritage, History and Regeneration, Steve 18-Oct Bowyer 29 Why is Peterborough City Centre a 25-Oct Conservation Area? Jo Burton 29 01-Nov Georgian Peterborough, Stuart Orme 68 Peterborough Before and After the coming of 08-Nov the Railways, Brian White 58 16-Nov Peterborough Cathedral Archaeology 74 21-Feb- 12 Ghosts of Peterborough, Stuart Orme 92 28-Feb Boongate- A Hamlet to the East, Brian Jones 65 6-Mar A History of Broadway, Stephen Perry 73 Vernacular Architecture, David Grech, English 13-Mar Heritage 63 Peterborough in Architectural Detail, Toby 20-Mar Wood and David Jost 75 27-Mar Wildlife and Buildings, James Fisher 49 TOTAL 718
  22. 22. 22MasterclassesThe Masterclasses also have a feedback element to them. Every attendee isgiven a feedback form and asked to fill it out.This has been overwhelmingly positive, with the content, pace and feedbackon the tutors coming in at 100 % good or excellent for every class. Wherefeedback has been given on room layouts and lighting that is not up tostandard this has been taken into account for future Masterclasses and hasdirectly informed them. The attendance at Masterclasses has to be smallerthan the lectures and has been nearly100% full so far in terms of capacity.Feedback has also been given through Twitter, as can be seen below fromtwo Masterclass attendees and the Quarry visit.
  23. 23. 23
  24. 24. 24Total number of Masterclasses run is 17 from the original 12 suggestedincluding one Heritage workshop run by SPAB out at Sacrewell Farm.Total attendees of Masterclasses: 402
  25. 25. 25Masterclass Summary Table Date Title Attendees Oct- Social Media and the Built Environment, James 1 26 Mott, Projectbook 24 Nov- 2 05 Archives Masterclass, Richard Hillier, Vivacity 23 Nov- Conservation Area Appraisal Masterclass, Jo 3 10 Burton, Beacon Planning 17 Architectural Drawing Masterclass, John Nov- Biggadike, Peterborough City Council and self 4 17 employed 16 Dec- Architectural Drawing Masterclass 2, John 5 10 Biggadike 12 Historic Environment and Sustainable Futures 06- Masterclass, Shape East with Chris Baines, Peter 6 Feb Rawlings and Dr Andrew Turton 48 7- 7 March House History Masterclass with Dr Nick Barratt 47 Legislation and ‘At Risk’ Masterclass with Shape 20- East, with Nicholas Ray, Lucie Carayon and 8 April Bobby Open 28 28- Heritage Interpretation Masterclass, Stuart 9 April Orme, Vivacity 17 19- May Researching People and Places with Local 10 2011 Studies Centre, Richard Hillier, Archivist 20 24 Maintaining Historic Buildings: Rot, Re-Use and May Calling in the Professionals! Peter Rawlings and 11 Tony Ingram 33 25 Bats and Historic Buildings Masterclass, Antony 12 May Mould 43 8 An A-Z Introduction to Fundraising and Projects, 13 June Alice Kershaw 8 9 14 June SPAB Masterclass workshop at Sacrewell Farm 20 18 Dry Stone Walling Masterclass, Peterborough 15 June Regional College 16 19 Heritage Photography Masterclass Day 1 with 16 June University Centre Peterborough 15 20 Heritage Photography Masterclass Day 2 with 17 June University Centre Peterborough 15 TOTAL 402
  26. 26. 264) Building SurveysOutcomes  Carry out a survey of at least 50 buildings in need in Peterborough by volunteer participants. Validate the results and obtain feedback from professional architects and surveyors.UpdateThree main groups of volunteer surveyors have undertaken surveys. These arethe Peterborough Civic Society under the direction of Peter Sargeant, exHuntingdon Conservation Officer who undertook the entire original Buildingsat Risk survey for Huntingdon. Alongside the Civic Society are students fromUniversity Centre Peterborough, who covered Broadway within the adjoiningPark Conservation Area, and Peterborough Regional College ConstructionStudents (Level 3) who covered the Park Road side of the Park ConservationArea.The Civic Society had the City Centre Conservation Area covered, splitting itinto 17 separate sections and dividing amongst themselves. The high levels of
  27. 27. 27expertise found within the society meant they could really hit the groundrunning on this and results were returned by the end of October.A group of 10 University Centre Peterborough Students undertook training anda tour of Broadway Cemetery and Central Park with the project officer andtheir tutor Abi Hunt, on October 2nd. They spent the afternoon surveying inpairs and in total surveyed 62 buildings on Broadway.The Peterborough Regional College Construction students undertook trainingand surveying in early November. They completed 17 surveys and are going
  28. 28. 28to be visiting the city centre with the project officer to examine some of thebuildings considered at greater need by the Civic Society in depth.
  29. 29. 29Total buildings surveyed is 247 (239 different buildings)Number of volunteers: 40Total amount of volunteer time for surveys and project support (excludingtime training in Masterclasses): 44 days.Taking into account the differing skill levels required each day this works outas a contribution of £4900 to the project.A toolkit of the results has been created and circulated. This will remain on theproject website following the end of the project.Jim Daley, Conservation Officer, speaks to a local agent in the City Centre.Some of the volunteers had never taken part in such a project before, and‘learning to look up’ and observe was as much of a project outcome as thesurvey results. One of the surveyors in the City Centre said ‘it has changed mywhole attitude to Peterborough’ as it made her more aware of the builtenvironment.Stuart Hobley, Development Manager at HLF East of England, said ”Thisproject has been an exciting and engaging way of giving people from acrossthe community the chance to explore and appreciate their local builtheritage. By providing volunteers with opportunities to learn new skills andraising awareness of these buildings at need, local people have taken animportant role in championing their historic environment."
  30. 30. 30Some of the buildings have been surveyed more than once, with the collegestudents comparing earlier results to their own. Once completed the formswere added to an online map and discussed with the Steering Group for theproject, including the Conservation Officer.Below, before (above) and after (below) of Greggs on Cathedral Square.Because the survey had been done and an issue identified the gutters werecleaned during the removal of the Christmas lights. The other actionsidentified are listed on the Civic Society tables below.
  31. 31. 31Civic Society City Centre Survey Results Map of survey area showing resultsResultsTotal city centre surveys: 133Total buildings surveyed 168‘In Need’ or ‘On way to in Need’ 90 properties (54%)Currently fine 78 properties. (46%)‘In Need’High Priority Properties (listed) ActionPoor/ Bad 8 surveys (11 properties)Priestgate opposite Museum Pre application advice given to developers50 Cowgate (target PSICA phase 3)Laurel Court EH already aware32 -33 Long Causeway (all issues seem to stem from some blocked gutters!) to get a letter from JD also.Lower priority (non listed) ActionNorth St Letter sent (x2) contact with tenantsMet Lounge and Sketchley (Bridge To be reviewed
  32. 32. 32St),Back entrance to JJB sports throughwheel yard6/6a Cathedral Square NB we arranged to clean gutters whilst removing Christmas decorationsOn way to ‘In Need’’Need NumberFair/ in some need 51 Surveys (69 properties)Fair/ Good 10 surveys (10 properties)Action: used as monitoring baseline, some listed properties picked out:Minster Precincts properties have been highlighted to Cathedral.Listed buildings outside of the precincts total 13 properties, all Grade II andpredominantly on Cowgate, Priestgate or Westgate. Exception is theGrapevine pub which is II*. Several local list buildings are on the list as well.Currently FineNeed NumberGood condition 63 surveys (78 properties)Action; celebration of good maintenance nearer the time.
  33. 33. 33David Turnock Architects: Summary Report For Buildings in NeedBUILDINGS IN NEED SUMMARY REPORTOver the period from October 2011 until February 2012 volunteers fromPeterborough Civic Society, Peterborough Regional College and UniversityCentre Peterborough undertook visual surveys of the external fabric of a totalof 239 buildings in Peterborough City Centre and the Park Conservation Area.Of this total 168 were within the City Centre Conservation Area, including TheCathedral Precincts, and 71 are located in the Park Conservation Area.Buildings inspected included those on the Statutory List of Listed Buildings.The spreadsheets within this report identify the condition of the external fabricof each building and include a summary designation of the state of generalrepair at the time of the survey. These are broken down into the followingcategories: Good/Fine condition Fair/Good Fair PoorThis broad categorisation serves to provide a picture of the current state ofthese 239 buildings, the summary for each area being as follows:City Centre/Cathedral Precincts:Poor 11 Properties 6.5%Fair 69 Properties 41%Fair/Good 10 Properties 6%Good 78 Properties 46.5%Total 168 100%Park Conservation Area:
  34. 34. 34Poor 10 Properties 15%Fair 30 Properties 42%Fair/Good 1 Property 1%Good 30 Properties 42%Total 71 Properties 100%City Centre Conservation AreaIf we look firstly at the City Centre area the analysis of these results gives thesemain observations: 1. There are a relatively small number of buildings currently regarded as poor but these, by the very nature of the issues identified in the survey, are likely to deteriorate at a faster rate. Where water ingress or structural faults are present then the consequent damage to the fabric of the building will take longer to repair and will cost more to remedy.. 2. The number of properties described as “Fair” forms 41% of the total. These are the buildings on the way to being “in need” and form the body of those properties where a regime of regular maintenance by owners would avoid their condition worsening in future. 3. “Fair/Good” and “Good” form the majority of the stock surveyed. Generally it is 1 or 2 items on each building where action is required in order to maintain them in the current category or improve a greater number to be designated as “good”. The conclusion is that regular maintenance of minor problems on these buildings is the best way to ensure that they are at least maintained in their current state and do not deteriorate any further. 4. In some areas it is the rear of buildings that gives greater cause for concern that the front elevations and this is very much the case for Wheel Yard which leads into the Cathedral Precincts. This road is used as the service access to shops fronting Long Causeway and given its nature as a service road, there seems to be little care given to elevation of these buildings. There are occurrences of boundary walls deteriorating, graffiti on doors and seemingly little maintenance given to the building fabric itself. Even where a rear elevation of a building has been designed with some degree of thought such as the rear of the Sports Direct Shop, there is little consideration given to storage of bins and waste which makes the elevation unattractive.Park Conservation AreaWith respect to the properties within the Park Conservation Area the majorityof those surveyed are either Victorian houses converted to commercial use
  35. 35. 35(lower Broadway and Park Road areas) or private houses. The mainexception to this is the Kings School on Park Road where the designation isgenerally good. It is generally those commercial premises which are eitherunoccupied or only occupied at ground floor where deterioration is occurringat roof or first floor level. Of the ten properties identified as “poor” thecommon items across all buildings is some missing brickwork/stonework towalls, plant growth in rainwater goods and decoration to the original timberwindows. Buildings such as the Kings School (which is in continuingoccupation and where a programme of refurbishment works is ongoing) areof a lesser immediate concern.General outcomes and recommendations a) Building owners who are keeping their properties in a good state of repair should be contacted and praised accordingly and encouraged to maintain a regular maintenance regime in the future. b) Where buildings are categorised as being in a “Poor” state action needs to be taken in bringing this to the attention of the building owner. (This has already been done with respect to properties that have visible defects that need remedying in the immediate future to avoid future deterioration e.g. missing roof slates). c) Encourage members of the public to notice the upper levels of buildings within the Conservation Areas. If people can be encouraged to look at the City Centre and Park Conservation Area buildings as they are as a shared heritage then there is a greater likelihood that essential repairs required to a building will be spotted sooner. There is also the opportunity to “name and shame” those owners who do not keep the fabric of their buildings in good repair. d) Identify those building details/ features which can be targeted for improvement e.g. inappropriate or poorly detailed shopfronts and fascias where a replacement or repair might not cost a great deal to carry out but the overall effect on the character of the Conservation Area would be hugely beneficial. A current example of this might be the Leeds Building Society fascia located in Queen Street Chambers which now stands out since the demolition of the building on the Corn Exchange site adjacent. e) Realise the impact of a poorly maintained building on its neighbours; a building that is allowed to deteriorate can “drag down” the visual quality of a street.About David Turnock ArchitectsDavid Turnock formed the company in 2001 to serve clients in Peterboroughand the surrounding Cambridgeshire area, having previously been a Director
  36. 36. 36at Ruddle Wilkinson Architects. David succeeded in developing his Clientbase and moved into new offices designed by the Company at Lynch Woodin 2004.The Company has since grown to a total of 12 staff with two Associates toassist David with the day to day management and now offers a fullyindependent design consultancy to deliver a high quality, creative andprofessional, service in both architecture and interior design. A key currentinterest is in low energy buildings where schemes are being designed to eitherVery Good or Excellent standard.Staff knowledge base is split approximately 50/50 between Architects andBuilding Technologists. We feel that this gives us a good balance betweendesign and construction detailing for our projects where design proposalsfollow good and efficient detailing practice. Our current projects generallyrange from £250,000 to £10m in value.With respect to the skills and experience of staff members, this is extremelyvaried including everything from airports, hospitals, railway installations andlarge retail environments to residential, student accommodation, medicaland laboratory developments, historic buildings and churches.Our approach as a Practice is to provide a very thorough service to ourClients throughout the British Isles and beyond.
  37. 37. 375) Promotion and CelebrationOutcomes  Promote the project and engage with interested local groups at a minimum of six meetings/events e.g. amenity society meetings, Heritage Open Days etc  Celebrate the projects achievements with a launch event for the public, including walking tours led by volunteers, hands on workshops and the publication of the survey results.UpdateThis project has been promoted at the following 6 events (as well as manymore!). This promotion has allowed information on the project to reach awide audience of over 1100 people.Promotion of projectat six events e.g.Heritage Open Day,Civic Soc September 10 andEvent 1 Heritage Open Days 11Event 2 Civic Society Meeting 5th September Environment Network Meeting and AllotmentEvent 3 Workshop Sept 22ndEvent 4 Heritage Attractions Group Meeting Sep-13Event 5 Local History Forum Sep-19Event 6 University Centre Peterborough Induction Sep-15
  38. 38. 38Due toinsurance issuesit has not beenpossible to havevolunteerwalking tours onthe night, but avolunteer who isalso a guide forthe city will bepaid to do thisaspect of theproject.
  39. 39. 39Below, a selection of the flyers and posters used to promote the project.The final event took place on June 28th at 6pm in St John’s Church. This is theweek after the Peterborough Heritage Festival, and on the evening for latenight shopping in the city, and has been decided upon for maximum impactand visibility.Press coverageFor this project the project officer and the tutors have been on BBC RadioPeterborough twice, BBC Radio Cambridgeshire three times and communityRadio Station ‘Radio Peterborough’ once.
  40. 40. 40Antony Mould from the Cambridge Bat Group on Radio Peterborough.Regular press releases have been sent to the local newspaper (PeterboroughEvening Telegraph), and eleven small articles and one larger article aboutthe project have been published. Local free magazine Scene has beensupportive.Promotion has been done through PECT’s Greeniversity, RSA Citizen Power’sonline ‘Ning’ space, through the Civic Society, Local History Forum,Environmental Network and the Destination Centre, as well as the HeritageRegeneration Officer Bulletin, which reaches over 750 individuals in the area.Local Libraries, coffee shops, Churches, the Town Hall and other publicbuildings have had flyers left in them. Several different flyers have beenproduced to target different audiences or for individual events. As well as thisa professional flyer and poster has been produced to cover the wholeproject. These have been printed off ‘in house’ and distributed by hand, postand email.Online the project workshops have featured on Projectbook, Heritage HUB,CBA, the Caravan Club website, Greeniversity, RIBA ‘Love Architecture’page.Support in Kind.This project has been lucky to receive support in kind from a number of localorganisations including Railworld, Peterborough Cathedral, Paper RhinoDesign and local experts. This support has totalled over £2000.CostsThe total Heritage Lottery Fund grant for the project was £24,200.
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  43. 43. 43Contents03. Introduction04. How to use the Toolkit12. Sources of Information13. Appendix A: Letter for Volunteers14. Appendix B: Survey Form15. Appendix C: Excel Spreadsheet of results andGoogle MapsWith thanks to English Heritage, Natural England, PeterboroughCity Council, Peterborough Civic Society, Peterborough RegionalCollege, University Centre PeterboroughFront cover images (top) Cowgate, Peterborough, (bottom left) Volunteer in Peterborough, (bottom right) City CentreBuilding.
  44. 44. 43Part I: Introduction details of which were turned into online training modules on the projectThis toolkit is designed to help create a website:baseline of the condition of historic http://peterboroughbuildingsinneed.wobuildings in a discrete area in order to rdpress.com/.assess and monitor the scale of neglectwith a view to finding a solution, with Why Peterborough?the overarching idea that prevention is Predominantly the built environmentbetter than cure. This toolkit assists of central Peterborough is of solidlywith the identification of interlinked Edwardian and Victorian stockissues, such as vacancy, and low however some buildings date back tomaintenance levels, across larger areas the Medieval period, and the streetas the first step in resolving such patterns remain unchanged in theproblems. majority for the last 900 years. The main project work was undertaken by groups of volunteers in the City Centre Conservation Area and its setting with a small comparison area surveyed in the adjoining Park Conservation Area. Peterborough Unitary Authority contains within it over 1000 listed buildings, which when surveyed in 2009 contained 9 ‘at risk’ structures as designated by the Local Authority and English Heritage, and 1 ‘at risk’ Conservation Area out of 29, the City Centre.Fig. 1 Cathedral Square, PeterboroughThis toolkit is an outcome of theHeritage Lottery Funded project‘Peterborough Buildings in Need’,which ran from October 2010 to June2012. This project focused upon thestanding built heritage, both designatedand undesignated, of PeterboroughCity Centre Conservation area. TheBuildings in Need project had twostrands, the first a survey of the CityCentre and comparison with aneighbouring area. The second is a Fig.2. Cowgate, Peterboroughseries of training and capacity buildingworkshops, masterclasses and lecturesfor volunteers and the general public,
  45. 45. 44To avoid more heritage assets endingup ‘at risk’ and to reduce the many Developed for use in Peterboroughfactors which put the City Centre City Centre Conservation Area, whichConservation Area into this category, is primarily commercial in nature, thethis project was designed to establish survey methodology can be used onwhich assets are most likely to be just one property or using multiplecurrently ‘in need’, to raise awareness streets it can be expanded to an entireof what leads to areas and buildings conservation area.being ‘in need’, and to identifymaintenance tasks can be done to It is completed on a building byprevent them becoming ‘at risk’. building basis, with one sheet per building.What is the Buildings in NeedToolkit For? What is ‘need’?This tool kit is designed to establish This toolkit defines ‘need’ in a trafficlevels of ‘need’ within the built light system relating to the fabric of theenvironment of a discrete area, using building an issues that lead to lack ofindividual properties as the default unit maintenance, such as vacancy of someto be surveyed with a picture becoming or all floors:apparent on surveying a collection ofbuildings. This is aggregated to Very Signs of structuralunderstand the pattern of need across Poor instability or structuralan area, and can ultimately enhance the failureConservation Area management plan. Poor Building with deteriorating masonry, leaking roofs,For this toolkit ‘need’ is defined as a usually accompanied byrequirement for maintenance or repair. general disrepair of mostIt is defined in relation to the English elements of the buildingHeritage ‘At Risk’ designations. fabric Fair Structurally sound but inBuildings that are suitable for the need of minor repairs ornational ‘at risk’ list may be showing signs of lack ofdiscovered through this process, general maintenance (e.g.however lesser degrees of need can blocked gutter, vegetationalso be identified. The toolkit results growth)can then be used to create Good Structurally sound andspecifications for targeted maintenance weather-tight and welland discrete interventions such as maintainedrepair, gutter cleaning and re-paintingthat will address the identified issues,thus preventing further deterioration. Why establish levels of need?The toolkit is for both listed and non In the 2011 report ‘Reducing the risks’listed properties of all ages and can be English Heritage highlight theused in Conservation areas to establish importance of good maintenance to thecommon issues for properties. historic environment:
  46. 46. 45 ‘Maintenance of heritage assets A survey such as Buildings in Need is essential if they are not to could be used to highlight areas where become at risk, and to prevent changed policy, strategy or investment those that are already at risk could benefit the built environment. from decaying further and The baseline could form part of a thereby escalating the cost of funding application as part of the their repair and consolidation. ‘evidence of need’ or consultation if Buildings, for instance, decay completed by a community group. rapidly when left empty.’Buildings in a degree of degradation Who is the Buildings in Need Toolkitaffect their setting, both aesthetically, for?economically and also socially. Thisties into research done by Kelling and This toolkit provides a standardWilson in 1982 which resulted in ‘The process for establishing low level riskbroken windows theory’ which is a or ‘need’ in an area. It can be used by:criminological theory of the signallingeffect of urban disorder and vandalism o Private owners and tenants,on additional crime and anti-social residential and businessbehaviour. The theory states that occupiersmonitoring and maintaining urban o Public amenity groups, Civicenvironments in a well-ordered Societies, interest groupscondition may stop further vandalism o Studentsand escalation into more serious crime. o Local Planning AuthoritiesThis has been used effectively in NewYork amongst other places. A wellpresented urban environment is also acatalyst for business investment in anarea. Fig.4. Staff from Peterborough City Council use the toolkit to survey buildings.Fig.3. Student volunteer in the Park Area
  47. 47. 46Part II: How to Use the answer in every section but do try to if possible. Use your judgement for this.Toolkit You will need to enter the 1) date ofBefore you start the survey and 2) your name and contact details.Speak to your local ConservationOfficer about a project of this nature if Name and/ or number of Buildingit covers a larger area than oneproperty. In Peterborough we supplied This should be evident from thethe volunteers with a letter on headed building itself. If it is not obvious,Council paper that explained what the write the shop name or the last knownproject was (see Appendix A). shop name here.Equipment Is it listed?  Clipboard  Survey Forms (see Appendix At Peterborough use was made of B) Peterborough Hawkeye online map for  Map volunteers to identify listed buildings  Pencil within the survey area. However, each local planning authority will operate its  High Visibility Vest own GIS system for recording listed  Camera buildings in a map format. If the local  Binoculars (for looking at roof planning authority cannot provide and chimneys etc) access to their GIS system, then the English Heritage Listed Buildings On-The survey is completed on a building line database should be used. Foundby building basis and you will need a online here: http://list.english-separate form for each property. heritage.org.uk/ the list has a ‘QuickAppendix B to this document includes Search’ function that should enable theexamples of the forms used at listing to be determined if the fullPeterborough. Electronic versions can name or part of the name of thebe downloaded from the Peterborough property is known. If the location isBuildings in Need project website and known but the property name is not themodified as for use elsewhere. ‘map search’ feature allows an areahttp://peterboroughbuildingsinneed.wo based search.rdpress.com/Completing the formsThe forms are designed to becompleted whilst onsite so includeseveral tick boxes, with some areas forbuilding specific comments asnecessary. You do not need to put an
  48. 48. 47 wish to suggest which of these three categories an unlisted building mightListed buildings make up about 2% of be placed.all buildings in England. There arethree grades of listing:Grade I A building of exceptional interest, only about 2.5% of all listed buildings are Grade IGrade II* Very important and of more than special interest, approximately 5.5% of listed buildings are of Grade II* Fig.5. Examples of Conservation Area Appraisals and Guidance notes.Grade II Buildings of special interest - these make up Period of Building around 92% of listed buildings At Peterborough most of the buildings in Peterborough City Centre Conservation Area date from the Georgian Period or later. Only a few early timber frame buildings surviveIn addition to statutory listed buildings along with some Medieval buildings inon the national list, some Local the Cathedral Precincts, being older.Planning Authorities will also have Again a Conservation Area Appraisaltheir own list of Locally Listed will be helpful in identifying the age ofBuildings. The Local Planning individual buildings. For listedAuthority will be able to provide buildings this information will beinformation on their Locally Listed included in the list description (see EHBuildings. listed buildings on line etc) If you know the date or approximate periodFinally, there will be unlisted buildings of this building enter it here.that are still identified as making eithera positive, neutral or negative Is the property occupied?contribution to the character andappearance of a Conservation Area. Answer either YES on all floors, NO ifThese will be identified on maps it is unoccupied, UNKNOWN if youwithin the relevant Conservation Area cannot tell EMPTY UPSTAIRS if itAppraisal prepared by the Local seems to be unused on the upperPlanning Authority. Some floors. Tick FOR SALE if there is aConservation Areas do not have an sale board.adopted Appraisal, in which casevolunteers undertaking a survey may
  49. 49. 48Current UseIs it a shop, cafe, estate agents? Pleasefill in the main use and function of thebuilding here. Fig.8. The Draper’s Arms, Peterborough Is there any evidence it was used as something else? For example at Peterborough the Drapers Arms was once a Drapers shop. If you do not know leave this answer blank.Fig.6 and Fig.7 Shop fascias in Peterborough City Centrephotographed by Buildings in Need VolunteerEvidence of previous use? Windows Do they look sound? Are they boarded? There may be unpainted frames and signs of decaying or rotting
  50. 50. 49woodwork, or signs of cracking to the roof1? Is the roof line straight orglass. Do they look original or are bowing? Note this in the other sectionthey modern replacements? if this is the case. Also what are the condition of the chimneys (if visible). Tall chimneys will often bow towards the south (due to salts being deposited in the bed joints on the north side, while the sun and wind dry out the south side) Fig 12, 13 and 14: A hole in a roof, bowing roofline and bituminous covering on a roof, potentially disguising issues. What kind of condition are the walls visible from the public footpath in? There may be evidence of damage through spalling stonework/ bricks, missing mortar, inappropriate repairs, cracks of all sizes, bowing or bulging in the wall (eye along the line of the Fig 9. 10 and 11: Protected and boarded windows, and a wall), damp, staining, defective render, smashed one in Peterborough City Centre. 1 The English Heritage Guidance note on thatch contains the following sentence ‘Bear in mind that theRoof Condition performance of thatch is not linked intimately to its appearance, and like a much-repaired wall a roof can present a motley appearance without being inferior to a much neater looking new job’. (English Heritage,Are there missing slates or tiles? Is Thatch and Thatching, 2000. Available online here:there evidence of decay in a thatched http://www.english- heritage.org.uk/content/publications/docs/thatchandth atching.pdf )
  51. 51. 50rot in exposed timber framing orvandalismFig 15 and 16. Damaged paintwork and stone/brick workGuttering and downpipesDo they seem blocked, is there Fig 17 and 18. Growth in gutter hopper heads.evidence for water running down thesides of buildings, such as patches of Evidence of Missing Architecturalgreen or plaster damage? Is there Features?evidence of plant growth in the tops ofgutters or hopper heads? If there is any evidence of missing architectural features which for this toolkit is defined as anything original to the building that has now disappeared, perhaps leaving a gap or differently coloured render or missing decorative ridge tiles, door knockers, boot scrapers etc, note this here.
  52. 52. 51 masonry, leaking roofs, usually accompanied by general disrepair of most elements of the building fabric Fair Structurally sound but in need of minor repairs or showing signs of lack of general maintenance Good Structurally sound and weather-tight Any other comments Add in anything else here. For each property a digital photo will also be required. For each building take a picture of the front elevation (the section of the building facing the street) and any details you feel are of particular interest, or defects you wish to record. About 4 pictures per building at a maximum should be about right.Fig 18 and 19:Missing features.General Condition?This section will create the traffic lightcoding when put onto a map. You willhave to use the previous answers andyour own judgement for this rating.Select one of the following:Very Signs of structuralPoor instability or structural failurePoor Building with deteriorating
  53. 53. 52 Estimate of urgency of works? If works seem urgent make a note here, this is helpful for absentee landlords to have an idea of urgency for the maintenance required. The proviso is obviously that this is the opinion of one person. What to do with your resultsFig 20, 21, 22 and 23 Examples of photos of oneproperty taken by volunteers for the Buildings in Need Once you have completed all the formsproject: for an area it is a good idea to meet as a group to first moderate your results to ensure a degree of consistency, then to meet with your Conservation Officer to discuss your findings. For Peterborough Buildings in Need the findings were transferred into an Excel spreadsheet that was then colour coded and this data transferred onto a Google Map so that the individual blocks of colour established by the traffic light system could be seen in an aggregated overview. See Appendix C for examples of the spreadsheets and
  54. 54. 53maps and the project website for the The annual English Heritage registercomplete set of outputs also includes Conservation Areas at Riskhttp://peterboroughbuildingsinneed.wo and the results of Buildings in Needsrdpress.com/. survey can help inform a Local Planning Authority in providing up-to-dateLocal authorities have a primary role in information to English Heritage on theprotecting the historic environment. state of their conservation areas,They often have a local heritage at risk including those which may need to beregister for buildings that are Grade II or added to the ‘at risk’ register.Locally Listed and are considered to be‘at risk’. If you believe you haveidentified a building that meets thiscriteria, in that in the traffic light systemit is red and is also listed Grade II orlocally listed, then you should raise thiswith your local Conservation Officer.English Heritage publish an annual listof Heritage at Risk, which includesGrade I and II* buildings. If you believeyour survey had identified a Grade I orII* building that needs to be added to theEnglish Heritage at risk register, thenthis should again be raised with the localConservation Officer, who will pass iton to English Heritage for theirconsideration to add to the national ‘atrisk’ register.Getting a building on one of these listscan be the first step in tackling neglect,and to assess and monitor the scale ofthe problem and prioritise resources andaction. Local authorities can take actionto secure the preservation andmaintenance of historic buildingsthrough the use of statutory notices.It is essential that local authorities makebest use of their powers to securebuildings at risk, to ‘stop the rot’ andprevent the costs escalating beyond thepoint where it is economic to repair. Toassist in the process English Heritagehas recently published updated guidance(Stopping the Rot) for local planningauthorities on taking action to savehistoric buildings.
  55. 55. 54Sources of Information: HELM website: http://www.helm.org.uk/Peterborough Buildings in Needproject website:http://peterboroughbuildingsinneed.wordpress.com/Heritage at Risk: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/caring/heritage-at-risk/Reducing Risk, 2011 available athttp://www.english-heritage.org.uk/content/publications/docs/acc-reducing-risks-2011.pdfStopping the Rot guidance toenforcement actions Local Authoritiescan take for historic buildings:http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/publications/stoppingtherot/SPAB maintenance site:http://www.maintainyourbuilding.org.uk/pages/maintenance.htmlStitch in Time Guidance availableonline here:http://www.dlrcoco.ie/conservation/IHBC.pdf
  56. 56. 55Appendix A – Letter for volunteers Telephone: 01733 317480 Facsimile: 01733 453505 E-Mail: alice.kershaw@peterborough.gov.uk Please ask for: Ms A Kershaw Our Ref: AK/BinN Opportunity Peterborough Stuart House East Wing Your Ref: St John’s Street Peterborough PE1 5DD Peterborough Direct Minicom 01733 452421 DX 12310 Peterborough 1 OPPORTUNITY PETERBOROUGH LOCAL BUILDINGS IN NEED To whom it may concern The person carrying out this Buildings in Need survey is a volunteer from the Peterborough Civic Society who is working on behalf of Opportunity Peterborough and the Conservation Team at Peterborough City Council. The aim of the project is to identify potential buildings ‘in need’ of maintenance in the city centre. The initial survey is being carried out throughout the City Centre Conservation Area during the autumn of 2011. Should you require any additional information or confirmation of the above work please call either Jim Daley (Principal Built Conservation Officer) on Peterborough 453522 or Alice Kershaw (Heritage Regeneration Officer) on Peterborough 317480. Thank you for your understanding and cooperation. Alice Kershaw Heritage Regeneration Officer
  57. 57. 56Appendix B – Survey Form Buildings in Buildings in Need Need Survey Form Www.PeterboroughBuildingsinNeed.Wordpress.com 1. Date………………………………………… 2. Surveyors Details Name of surveyor Email Address: Phone Number: 3. Please enter the property details. Please enter the property details. Address of Property Address 2: Listed? (if known) Yes/No List Grade? (if known) 4. Is the property occupied? Yes No Unknown Empt y upstairs For Sale Current Use and any evidence of Previous Use
  58. 58. 575. Condition of windowsPlease tick or underlineGood - structurally sound, well maintained and paintedFair - showing some lack of maintenance, poor decorationPoor - in need of maintenanceVery bad - broken or boarded, rot6. Condition of roof if visiblePlease tick or underlineGood – well maintained, wind and weather tightFair – wind and weather tight, no visible deteriorationPoor – slipped slatesVery Bad – missing slates, holesIs there evidence of previous repair eg mortar on the roof, different colour patches?Describe:Other (please specify)7. Condition of visible walls? (Front or side walls visible from public footpath) Many Some No evidenceMissing stonework/bricksMissing mortarInappropriate mortarrepairsSmall cracksMajor cracksEvidence of wallmovementDamp/ waterstainingGraffitiPeeling plaster orrenderOther (please specify)……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
  59. 59. 588. Do the rainwater goods appear sound? Gutt ers with plant growth visible Cracks No obvious problem9. Is there evidence of missing or damaged architectural features?What?………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………10. General condition of visible parts of the building? very bad (st ructural failure or signs of st ructural instabilit y) poor (building wit h det eriorat ing masonry, leaking roofs, usually accompdet erioration of most element s of t he building fabric) fair (st ructurally sound but in need of minor repairs or showing signs of lacmaint enance good condit ion (st ruct urally sound and weather-tight)11. Any further comments…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………..12. Estimate of urgency of works?In the next:3 Months6-9 Months12 MonthsPlease include a shot of the building and any issues if possible.Please make a note of the time you spent recording this building……………………….Please return by post to Alice Kershaw, Opportunity Peterborough, Stuart House East, StJohns Street, Peterborough, PE1 5DD or email to alice.kershaw@peterborough.gov.uk
  60. 60. 59NotesThere is more information on Buildings in Need at:www.Pet erboroughBuildingsinNeed.Wordpress.comIs it listed?To est ablish if the building is list ed and the grade use Peterborough Hawk-eye.http://hawkeye.peterborough.gov.uk/hawkeye/To use Hawkeye simply zoom t o the location required, if you do not know t headdress, or enter the address in the search box (t op right , between layersand nearest).Once you have a location in t he central box you can either see it as a St reetView, Ordnance Survey map, or an aerial view. This would be good to haveas a print out to allow you to find t he propert y on t he ground.To find out if the building is listed click on Built Environment on the right handside, and check the box for Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas.Then click Display on Map. This will show you if the property is in t he cit y cen-tre conservat ion area or not , and if it is red and you hover the cursor over it itwill show you t he name and list ing grade. If the building is not listed it is st ill ofint erest in the cit y cent re, it does not mater for t his survey whether you surveya listed building or not!List ed buildings make up about 2% of all buildings in England. There are threegrades of list ing:Grade I - a building of exceptional int erest , only about 2.5% of all listed build-ings are Grade IGrade II* - very important and of more than special int erest, 5.5% of list edbuildings are of this gradeGrade II - buildings of special interest - t hese make up around 92% of listedbuildings
  61. 61. 60Appendix C: Excel Spreadsheet of results and Google Maps
  62. 62. Alice KershawHeritage Regeneration OfficerEmail: alice.kershaw@peterborough.gov.ukWebsite: www.opportunitypeterborough.co.uk/heritageProject website: http://peterboroughbuildingsinneed.wordpress.com/

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