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What makes Peterborough City Centre a ‘Conservation Area’?   Joanna Burton Consultant, Beacon Planning
What is a conservation area? <ul><li>First introduced in 1967. </li></ul><ul><li>Designated under Section 69 and 70 of the...
Where are conservation areas? <ul><li>Any areas that have been identified to be of  special architectural or historic inte...
Peterborough conservation areas Peterborough has 29 designated conservation areas:
How are they designated? <ul><li>Appraisal led process </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the broad area to assess </li></ul><ul><...
Special historic interest <ul><li>Historic map analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Archival research </li></ul><ul><li>Historic pho...
Special architectural interest <ul><li>Statutory listed buildings </li></ul><ul><li>Buildings of local interest </li></ul>...
Guidance Guidance library:  www.helm.org.uk Published in 2011  by English Heritage to replace  Guidance on conservation ar...
So why Peterborough City Centre? <ul><li>First designated in June 1969 to cover the whole of the city centre including the...
Special historic interest <ul><li>Pre-historic   - fen edge settlements and along River Nene  e.g. Flag Fen </li></ul><ul>...
Special historic interest <ul><li>Post-Medieval - after the Reformation abbey church designated a      cathedral and town ...
Special architectural interest Character areas <ul><li>Bridge Street/Long Causeway </li></ul><ul><li>2. Cowgate </li></ul>...
Character area 1 Bridge Street/Long Causeway - City centre core including principal commercial streets, key public open sp...
Character area 1 Bridge Street/Long Causeway
Character area 2 Cowgate <ul><li>Commercial in character with smaller units than Character Area 1. </li></ul><ul><li>Small...
Character area 2 Cowgate
Character area 3 Priestgate <ul><li>Quiet, enclosed space with a varied but coherent built form with a human-scale  </li><...
Character area 3 Priestgate
Character area 4  Westgate <ul><li>Strong C19 and C20 character that is more domestic in scale created by the dominance of...
Character area 4  Westgate
Character area 5 Cathedral Precincts <ul><li>Good survival of medieval buildings with stone and collyweston slates the dom...
Character area 5 Cathedral Precincts
What does it mean? Demolition:    Any demolition within a Conservation Area, aside from demolition for which there is spec...
What does it mean? Permitted development rights:  The rights that owners have to do works to their properties without plan...
What does it mean? <ul><li>- Planning authorities, when deciding whether to grant planning permission within Conservation ...
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What makes Peterborough City Centre a ‘conservation area'?

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What makes Peterborough City Centre a ‘conservation area'?

  1. 1. What makes Peterborough City Centre a ‘Conservation Area’? Joanna Burton Consultant, Beacon Planning
  2. 2. What is a conservation area? <ul><li>First introduced in 1967. </li></ul><ul><li>Designated under Section 69 and 70 of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990. </li></ul><ul><li>Part 1 of this act requires that every local authority: </li></ul><ul><li>“ shall from time to time determine which parts of their area are areas of special architectural or historic interest the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance ” </li></ul>
  3. 3. Where are conservation areas? <ul><li>Any areas that have been identified to be of special architectural or historic interest. </li></ul><ul><li>Town and city centres </li></ul><ul><li>Rural villages and hamlets </li></ul><ul><li>Historic associations with a particular industry or event e.g. mining, fishing, philanthropist model villages </li></ul><ul><li>Homogenous in date and chronology e.g. C19 suburbs </li></ul><ul><li>Exceptional public realm or quality of open spaces </li></ul><ul><li>Individual heritage assets e.g. country estates </li></ul><ul><li>8,000+ designated conservation areas in England </li></ul>
  4. 4. Peterborough conservation areas Peterborough has 29 designated conservation areas:
  5. 5. How are they designated? <ul><li>Appraisal led process </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the broad area to assess </li></ul><ul><li>Appraise the special historic and/or architectural interest </li></ul><ul><li>Make a recommendation </li></ul><ul><li>Public consultation exercise </li></ul><ul><li>Designate boundaries </li></ul><ul><li>Adopt Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Review </li></ul>
  6. 6. Special historic interest <ul><li>Historic map analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Archival research </li></ul><ul><li>Historic photographs </li></ul>Peterborough, 1610 Cathedral Square, 1795 Church Street, 1906
  7. 7. Special architectural interest <ul><li>Statutory listed buildings </li></ul><ul><li>Buildings of local interest </li></ul><ul><li>Buildings of townscape merit </li></ul><ul><li>Architectural groupings </li></ul><ul><li>Palette of materials </li></ul><ul><li>Scale and massing </li></ul><ul><li>Unique characteristics </li></ul><ul><li>Local distinctiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Landmarks </li></ul><ul><li>Views and vistas </li></ul><ul><li>Public realm </li></ul><ul><li>Trees </li></ul>
  8. 8. Guidance Guidance library: www.helm.org.uk Published in 2011 by English Heritage to replace Guidance on conservation area appraisals and Guidance on the management of conservation areas.
  9. 9. So why Peterborough City Centre? <ul><li>First designated in June 1969 to cover the whole of the city centre including the cathedral precincts, Cowgate, Priestgate, Westgate and Bridge Street. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the first of the 29 conservation areas located within the Peterborough City Council administrative area. </li></ul><ul><li>Designated at the outset of the City’s expansion under the New Towns Act. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Special historic interest <ul><li>Pre-historic - fen edge settlements and along River Nene e.g. Flag Fen </li></ul><ul><li>Roman - network of forts e.g. Longthorpe, Ferry Meadows, although - little significant evidence of Roman activity in modern day Peterborough City Centre </li></ul><ul><li>- Roman town of Durobrivae abandoned by 5 th century </li></ul><ul><li>Medieval - Mid-Saxon period a monastery was established at Medeshamstede, the Anglo-Saxon name for Peterborough </li></ul><ul><li>- Late-Saxon period Medeshamstede started to be referred to as Burgh </li></ul><ul><li>- City ransacked 1069 by Danish fleet </li></ul><ul><li>- C12 abbey precincts extended and new town founded to the west of the cathedral – modern day city centre </li></ul><ul><li>- new town bridge 1307 </li></ul>
  11. 11. Special historic interest <ul><li>Post-Medieval - after the Reformation abbey church designated a cathedral and town gains city status </li></ul><ul><li>- period of limited expansion although restoration brought a wave of new building including the Guildhall, erected 1669 </li></ul><ul><li>C18 - not a period of expansion with the exception of new buildings along Westgate </li></ul><ul><li>- buildings within the medieval town re-built and re-fronted, including those around Cathedral Square </li></ul><ul><li>C19 - period of rapid expansion, catalysed by the arrival of the railway in 1845 </li></ul><ul><li>- new areas of expansion, particularly along Cowgate as well as extensive replacement of earlier buildings within the city </li></ul><ul><li>C20 - first half of the C20 bought the first comprehensive redevelopments such as the Town Hall and Westgate Arcade </li></ul><ul><li>- late 1970s/ early 1980s brought new town status and a major re- planning undertaken by the Development Corporation </li></ul>
  12. 12. Special architectural interest Character areas <ul><li>Bridge Street/Long Causeway </li></ul><ul><li>2. Cowgate </li></ul><ul><li>3. Priestgate </li></ul><ul><li>4. Westgate </li></ul><ul><li>5. Cathedral Precincts </li></ul>© Crown copyright. All rights reserved (100024236) 2011
  13. 13. Character area 1 Bridge Street/Long Causeway - City centre core including principal commercial streets, key public open spaces and imposing civic buildings. - Follows the earlier medieval street alignment but is largely C19 character with C20 redevelopments including the landmark 1930s Town Hall. - Green north-south axis along Bridge Street and Long Causeway which meets the stone east-west axis along Cowgate and Church Street, including the public open spaces of Cathedral Square. - Animated pedestrianised spaces with lively street activities and high levels of footfall. © Crown copyright. All rights reserved (100024236) 2011
  14. 14. Character area 1 Bridge Street/Long Causeway
  15. 15. Character area 2 Cowgate <ul><li>Commercial in character with smaller units than Character Area 1. </li></ul><ul><li>Smaller scale 3 storey brick development with some landmark stone buildings. </li></ul><ul><li>- C19 detailing surviving at first floor and above, with some console brackets surviving at ground floor level. </li></ul>© Crown copyright. All rights reserved (100024236) 2011
  16. 16. Character area 2 Cowgate
  17. 17. Character area 3 Priestgate <ul><li>Quiet, enclosed space with a varied but coherent built form with a human-scale </li></ul><ul><li>Predominantly office use as opposed to retail </li></ul><ul><li>C18 and C19 in character with strong use of stone </li></ul><ul><li>- Key views to the Former </li></ul><ul><li>Presbyterian Church and Town Hall </li></ul>© Crown copyright. All rights reserved (100024236) 2011
  18. 18. Character area 3 Priestgate
  19. 19. Character area 4 Westgate <ul><li>Strong C19 and C20 character that is more domestic in scale created by the dominance of brick and slate and Victorian architectural detailing, with the notable exception of the late C18 The Bull Hotel </li></ul><ul><li>Commercial and entertainment uses </li></ul><ul><li>Shared space by both pedestrians and vehicles </li></ul><ul><li>Dominated by the built environment and Highways, with few green spaces or trees </li></ul><ul><li>- Many enhancement opportunities as a result of a number of poor C20 developments and under-use </li></ul>
  20. 20. Character area 4 Westgate
  21. 21. Character area 5 Cathedral Precincts <ul><li>Good survival of medieval buildings with stone and collyweston slates the dominant building materials. </li></ul><ul><li>Key open green spaces both within and outside of the Precincts. </li></ul><ul><li>Key views to the west front and towers from within the character area. </li></ul><ul><li>Ecclesiastical use </li></ul>
  22. 22. Character area 5 Cathedral Precincts
  23. 23. What does it mean? Demolition:  Any demolition within a Conservation Area, aside from demolition for which there is specific statutory exemption, requires Conservation Area Consent granted by the relevant planning authority. Demolition without consent is a criminal offence. There is a presumption in favour of retaining those buildings that have been identified to make a positive contribution to the special interest of such areas.  Scrutiny: Planning applications will be judged in part on their impact on the character and appearance of the conservation area and/or its settings, with a requirement to preserve or enhance the special architectural or historic interest. This will most often necessitate high quality design and materials. English Heritage is invited to comment on development proposals that are considered to affect the character or appearance of a conservation area, or where a material change of use is proposed – in both instances where the application site is over 1,000 square metres . Trees: Proposals to cut down, top or lop a tree in a Conservation Area must notify the local planning authority to give them the opportunity to assess the contribution that the tree makes to the character of the area and protect it if necessary using a Tree Preservation Order.
  24. 24. What does it mean? Permitted development rights: The rights that owners have to do works to their properties without planning permission are reduced, and can be further restricted through the use of an Article 4 Direction. This includes applying certain types of cladding, inserting dormer windows, and erecting satellite dishes that can be seen from the highway.  Article 4(2) Direction: Local planning authorities may increase the controls on other alterations, such as replacing windows and doors, painting a building a different colour, or replacing/altering other features that contribute to the significance of the conservation area.  These must be supported by a strong justification and local planning authorities must take into account the views of local people before doing so. Planning policy: Most local planning authorities will have local plan policies to guide development within conservation areas. The conservation area appraisal and management plans are often adopted as supplementary planning guidance.
  25. 25. What does it mean? <ul><li>- Planning authorities, when deciding whether to grant planning permission within Conservation Areas, are required by law to pay special attention to the need to preserve or enhance </li></ul><ul><li>- Local planning authorities should take into account the desirability of sustaining and enhancing the significance of heritage assets – HE7.4 PPS5 </li></ul><ul><li>- There should be a presumption in favour of the conservation of designated heritage assets – HE9.1 PPS5 </li></ul>
  26. 26. Questions?

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